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House of Commons Hansard #28 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

Government Response To PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to seven petitions.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé Liberalfor the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-27, an act to amend the Criminal Code (child prostitution, child sex tourism, criminal harassment and female genital mutilation).

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Competition ActRoutine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Raymond Bonin Liberal Nickel Belt, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-266, an act to amend the Competition Act (protection of whistle-blowers).

Madam Speaker, I stand today to introduce a bill entitled an act to amend the Competition Act (protection of whistle-blowers). This bill is about consumer protection, the right and protection of employees who refuse to partake in illegal anti-competitive activities sponsored by their employers which hurt the consumer. It is about improving the investigation and prosecution of companies that engage in price fixing and price gouging.

Consumers continue to be victimized by market-wide fluctuations in the price of gasoline. Both levels of government say that they sympathize with consumers but add they cannot prove price fixing. Consumers know that price fixing exists and demand that governments stand up to protect their interests. This bill provides us with the evidence gathering tools needed to expose how gas prices are really set and put an end to the practice of gouging the consumer at the pumps.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Competition ActRoutine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Liberal Ontario, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-267, an act to amend the Competition Act (gasoline pricing).

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to see that my colleague moved a similar motion to mine before I had an opportunity to present this bill.

The bill amends the Competition Act to require oil companies to give 30-days' notice of any increase in the price at which they sell gasoline to gasoline retail distributors if the increase is more than 1 per cent.

Such notice is to be given to the minister responsible for enforcing the act and shall include the effective date of the price increase and the reason or reasons for it.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

April 18th, 1996 / 10:10 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The House resumed from April 17 consideration of the motion that Bill C-15, an act to amend, enact and repeal certain laws relating to financial institutions, be read the third time and passed.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Is the House ready for the question?

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Question.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

All those in favour will please say yea.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

All those opposed will please say nay.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

In my opinion the yeas have it.

And more than five members having risen:

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Call in the members.

And the division bells having rung:

Bank ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Pursuant to Standing Order 76(8), the recorded division on the motion stands deferred until Monday.

Department Of Human Resources Development ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé Liberalfor the Minister of Human Resources Development

moved that Bill C-11, an act to establish the Department of Human Resources Development and to amend and repeal certain related acts, be read the third time and passed.

Department Of Human Resources Development ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Roger Simmons Liberal Burin—St. George's, NL

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to have the opportunity to say a few words about Bill C-11, an act to establish the Department of Human Resources Development.

The purpose of this bill is to ask Parliament to formalize the existence of the new department, which has already shown itself to be a pragmatic, efficient and effective entity. There is no hidden agenda here which will disappoint some of my friends in the Reform Party. It is business as usual.

Department Of Human Resources Development ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Reform Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

You can fool some of the people some of the time but not all the people all of the time.

Department Of Human Resources Development ActGovernment Orders

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Roger Simmons Liberal Burin—St. George's, NL

The member is standing proof of that.

The bill confirms the minister's responsibility to develop the human resources that fall under the mandate of the Government of Canada. It does nothing to extend or to diminish the minister's powers, nor does the legislation introduce any substantive changes to government policies or programs.

As members will know, the government is committed to an effective and efficient operation.

At the time of structuring it was realized that encompassing all human resources in one department would better serve the needs of Canadians. To that end, Labour Canada is now part of human resources. The bill provides for the appointment of a minister of labour. However, so there is no confusion, appointment of a minister of labour does not in any way mean further reorganization of the department.

During the current restructuring of the Canadian economy the government is placing a high priority on issues such as labour relations, occupational safety and health and workplace standards as well as other issues that have a profound effect on Canada's labour markets.

These concerns are in keeping with the Government of Canada's responsibility for labour relations in several key areas which are under federal jurisdiction, including transportation, banking and communications. As well, the government is signatory to a number of international labour agreements, hence the need for a role under this department.

It is the responsibility of the Minister of Labour to ensure these issues receive the attention they reserve. With that in mind, modernization of the Canadian Labour Code is one of Labour Canada's key undertakings.

Prior to the reorganization of the government, employment and immigration came under the same roof. That is no longer the case with this new bill and this new department.

The former Canada Employment and Immigration Commission will become the Canada Employment Insurance Commission, and the commission will continue its mandate with regard to policies affecting employment, labour market conditions and revitalization of the unemployment insurance program.

That brings me to an issue I particularly want to address under the aegis of this bill. This is not a bill particularly about employ-

ment insurance. It is a bill about a department that has responsibility for the proposals now making their way through the system. Within a few days the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development will report to the House on its recommendations concerning the proposals tabled on December 1 by the now Minister of Foreign Affairs.

I have said many times publicly that I believe these proposals constitute an overall improvement in what we have had in terms of employment insurance. However, there have been some concerns expressed by my constituents and by people in Atlantic Canada generally, including by me.

I have expressed concerns and continue to have concerns about the so-called intensity rule, punishing people who through no fault of their own must have more frequent access to unemployment insurance benefits than other people. It is a fact of life. It is a characteristic of this country that there are a number of industries which by definition are seasonal, resource extractions certainly being in that category.

Although not exclusively, the Atlantic provinces are very much identified with these types of industries; mineral extraction in Labrador and parts of the island of Newfoundland and other parts of Atlantic Canada, and forestry and fishery. All three of these have seasonal implications.

What would the country be today without access to the vast resources of Atlantic Canada? I submit that the manufacturing complex of central Canada would be less vibrant without the resource sectors of other parts of the country.

For these reasons and for others we have never made any apology about the seasonal nature of our work activity. While we make no apologies, we wish it were otherwise in terms of the individuals concerned. If we gave any people in my riding, and I suspect I reflect the views of elsewhere in Atlantic Canada, the choice between unemployment insurance benefits and full time, 12 month work, they would take the latter.

It bears repeating because people who have not lived the experience in Atlantic Canada tend to generalize. There is still a generalization out there that Newfoundlanders and Atlantic Canadians are a bunch of lazy people who work for ten weeks so they can get their stamps and sit around drinking beer for the other 42 weeks.

Department Of Human Resources Development ActGovernment Orders

10:20 a.m.

An hon. member

Get rid of the GST and create jobs.