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House of Commons Hansard #161 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was billion.

Topics

Hazardous Products ActRoutine Proceedings

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-425, an act to amend the Hazardous Products Act.

Madam Speaker, this bill amends the Hazardous Products Act (definition of child), in section 2, by adding in the alphabetical order: ""child" means a person under eighteen years of age". The purpose of this bill is to harmonize the definition of "child" in the Hazardous Products Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canada Cooperative Associations ActRoutine Proceedings

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-426, an act to amend the Canada Cooperative Associations Act (definition of infant).

Madam Speaker, in the act, when we refer to children we use the word "infant", not "child". Therefore, this bill seeks to amend subsection 3(1) of the Canada Cooperative Associations Act by adding the following in the alphabetical order: ""infant" means an individual who is less than eighteen years of age".

The purpose of this amendment is to ensure consistency in the act by specifying that a child is a person who is under 18 years of age.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Excise Tax ActRoutine Proceedings

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-427, an act to amend the Excise Tax Act (definition of child).

Madam Speaker, this bill provides that a "child" is "a person who is less than eighteen years of age", so as to reflect the definition of "child", as proposed in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Indian ActRoutine Proceedings

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-428, an act to amend the Indian Act (definition of infant child).

Madam Speaker, this particular bill attempts to amend the Indian Act dealing with the definition of infant child. Also, if we were to look into this act, this legislation would ensure that the term "infant child" as is mentioned in the act in relation to guardianship and administration of the property of Indian children would be interpreted consistently with the definition of child proposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as a person who is less than 18 years of age.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police ActRoutine Proceedings

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-429, an act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act (definition of child).

Madam Speaker, this particular bill seeks an amendment to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act (definition of child). This bill would amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act to add the definition of child to the section that relates to children who testify to be accompanied by a parent. This would ensure that the act would be interpreted consistently with the definition of child proposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as a person who is less than 18 years of age.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Insurance Companies ActRoutine Proceedings

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-430, an act to amend the Insurance Companies Act (definition of infant).

Madam Speaker, this is a bill to amend the Insurance Companies Act (definition of infant). Its purpose is to ensure that the term "infant" as it is seen in the context of dealing with issues in regard to insurance will be interpreted consistently with the

definition of child as proposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

As members know, under that convention country members have agreed to amend all of their legislation in order to ensure that they have a cohesive policy when dealing with children. This amendment will ensure that is the case.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Land Titles ActRoutine Proceedings

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-431, an act to amend the Land Titles Act (age of majority and definition of infant).

Madam Speaker, this is an act to amend the Land Titles Act (age of majority and definition of infant). This act has been replaced with respect to the Northwest Territories and the Yukon Territory but remains in force with respect to Nunavut.

This bill changes the meaning of full age of majority and various provisions of the act to 18 years old. It also ensures that infants and infancy in relation to land transactions will also mean a person under 18 years of age. The act would then be interpreted consistently with the definition of child proposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as a person who is less than 18 years old.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canada Transportation ActRoutine Proceedings

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-432, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act (definition of adult).

Madam Speaker, this bill attempts to amend the Canada Transportation Act (definition of adult). This bill amends the Canada Transportation Act to add the definition of adult. This ensures that the act would be interpreted consistently with the definition of child proposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Some people may ask why we did not have one act to cover all those together. Simply put, it is not feasible. No matter what, each act would have to be amended and that is why this bill has come forward.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Pension Fund Societies ActRoutine Proceedings

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-433, an act to amend the Pension Fund Societies Act (definition of minor child).

Madam Speaker, this is an act to amend the Pension Fund Societies Act (definition of minor child). Specifically, we propose an amendment to section 2 of the Pension Fund Societies Act, to include the following definition of "minor child": "a person under eighteen years of age".

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Privacy ActRoutine Proceedings

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-434, an act to amend the Privacy Act (definition of minor).

Madam Speaker, this is an act to amend the Privacy Act. More specifically, this bill amends section 77 of the Privacy Act. Its purpose is to amend the Privacy Act by adding to the section providing for the making of regulations and a definition of "minor", so that the act will be consistent with the proposed definition of "child" under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, that is a person under eighteen years of age.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Territorial Lands ActRoutine Proceedings

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-435, an act to amend the Territorial Lands Act (definition of adult).

Madam Speaker, this is also one of the series of bills the intent of which is for us to address each specific aspect of the federal legislation as an entity on its own. Simply put, it is imperative for us when dealing with the federal statutes to study each statute separately in order to see its ramifications when it comes to children. There is not one piece of federal legislation that would not have an impact on a child. To that extent, the intent is to address each specific piece of legislation.

For example, if these bills were introduced as an omnibus bill as the province of Ontario did and if one member of Parliament or one cabinet minister had a problem with one of those pieces of legislation, we would vote against all the legislation.

To that extent, because it is such an important initiative and such an important commitment that Canada has made to the United Nations and its other member nations, it is imperative for us to give this matter the priority it deserves and to address it in a cohesive, comprehensive and progressive fashion.

That is why all those pieces of legislation are being put before the House today, hopefully for study after the election. When we come back, we will have a chance to reintroduce them. Specific committees could look at each one and try to strengthen each piece of legislation to ensure that the interests of the child are protected and paramount.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Wages Liability ActRoutine Proceedings

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-436, an act to amend the Wages Liability Act (definition of adult).

Madam Speaker, this is a bill to amend the Wages Liability Act. I am trying to harmonize this act with the definition of a child and to ensure that child means anyone under the age of 18.

This is part of a series of legislation I have proposed today. There is a lot more to come over the next few days. The intent is to bring to the forefront the whole notion of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the issues that were dealt with at that time.

We have started to see movement by the provincial governments. In particular the province of Alberta set up a task force to deal with the involvement of children in prostitution. The committee unanimously recommended to the federal government that it amend the relevant Criminal Code sections to reflect all provisions and all prostitution related offences perpetrated against youths as those involving persons under the age of 18.

The same task force said that at the provincial level Alberta should change all of its legislation in order to define a child as anyone under the age of 18. We are starting to see movement at the provincial level to harmonize legislation in terms of children.

There is one more important thing to put on the table. My colleague from the NDP tried to harass me earlier about why I am introducing so much legislation that deals with children. In the province of Ontario the NDP was in power for a number of years and had plenty of time to address the provincial legislation that dealt with the notion of children. It had plenty of time to harmonize its legislation to be in conformity with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. There are in excess of 75 pieces of provincial legislation that deal with the issue of children. In many cases the legislation is extremely contradictory.

I am proposing this legislation at the federal level with the hope that it will be considered. We have no authority over what the provincial governments do with their legislation. We have a moral authority and a moral obligation collectively as taxpayers and as elected officials across the land to collectively harmonize all of our legislation provincially and federally.

A committee was struck by the UN and in passing, I thank Senator Landon Pearson and her capable staff member, Yolande, who supplied me with a copy of a UN committee report. It praises Canada for what it has done in terms of its commitment to children. The committee took note of the effort made by Canada in participating in international projects relating to children in co-operation with UNICEF and other governmental and non-governmental organizations.

The same committee indicated its concern about the lack of conformity and the lack of uniformity when it comes to federal, provincial and territorial legislation in Canada. The committee has given Canada the deadline of 1999 to harmonize all federal, provincial and territorial legislation for consistency and conformity with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Unless we have that consistency we cannot take collective action, set priorities or take our proper responsibility. We cannot devise a national action plan to deal with the notion of children unless we agree on what constitutes a child. Parents must know when they legally stop being responsible for their children. When do children have rights? When does society as a whole have to take action? All those elements were addressed by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

I want to conclude by saying that I agree with Mrs. Clinton when she said that it takes a village to raise a child.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Sunshine DayRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Joe Comuzzi Liberal Thunder Bay—Nipigon, ON

Madam Speaker, I believe you would find all-party support for the following motion. I move:

That June 21st be declared Sunshine Day in Canada.

The Sunshine Foundation is a national charitable organization with offices in all provinces and has over 30 active chapters. The foundation makes dreams come true for special children challenged by life threatening illnesses or severe physical disabilities.

It is funded solely by donations and does not look to any government level for support.

The foundation chose June 21 as its special day because it is the longest day of sunshine throughout the year. It works for special children throughout Canada and truly appreciates the all-party support the House will give to the motion today.

Sunshine DayRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Does the hon. member have unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Sunshine DayRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Sunshine DayRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Sunshine DayRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to.)

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel Liberal St. Boniface, MB

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to present this petition on behalf of many Manitobans.

The petitioners ask members of Parliament to remove the GST from books, magazines and newspapers, an idea I have supported for a long time and still do.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Reform

Ed Harper Reform Simcoe Centre, ON

Madam Speaker, I have three petitions to present today on behalf of concerned Canadians.

The first one concerns age of consent laws. The petitioners ask that Parliament set the age of consent at 18 years to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

Reform

Ed Harper Reform Simcoe Centre, ON

Madam Speaker, the second and third petitions concern the taxation of books. One is from my riding of Simcoe Centre and the other is from the riding of Mission-Coquitlam.

The petitioners ask that the Prime Minister carry out his September 1992 promise to remove the GST from books.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Len Taylor NDP The Battlefords—Meadow Lake, SK

Madam Speaker, I have the privilege and pleasure today to present a petition pursuant to Standing Order 36.

The petition is signed by in excess of 5,000 Canadians from coast to coast, all of whom are concerned about the future of Parks Canada.

The petitioners note that the federal government is making plans to "offload functions at Parks Canada through employee takeovers". This is a contracting out scheme that will have a devastating impact on many remote communities where national parks are located.

They also note that they care a great deal about the national parks system and the environment and state they will lose the integrity of the park system if it is privatized.

The petitioners request that Parliament stop the employee takeover proposal and work with the citizens and Parks Canada workers to develop cost saving ideas while at the same time preserve Canadian heritage.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

April 22nd, 1997 / 11:35 a.m.

NDP

Len Taylor NDP The Battlefords—Meadow Lake, SK

Madam Speaker, I have a second petition today signed by a number of residents of my constituency, specifically from the city of North Battleford, the towns of Speers and Jackfish Lake, and a few others.

The petitioners note that 38 per cent of the national highway system is substandard and that the national highway policy study identified job creation, economic development, national unity, saving lives, avoiding injuries, lower congestion, lower vehicle operating costs and better international competitiveness as benefits of the proposed national highway program.

Therefore the petitioners call upon Parliament to urge the federal government to join with provincial governments to make national highway system upgrading possible.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Liberal Lincoln, ON

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 it is my honour to table a petition on behalf of my constituents in Lincoln.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that charitable organizations are being called upon to provide an increasing number of services for individuals in need.

Therefore the petitioners request that Parliament change the taxation formula so that an equal percentage of political and charitable donations are deductible.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

11:35 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

I wish to inform the House that, due to the ministerial statement, Government Orders will be extended by 34 minutes.

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

11:35 a.m.

London West Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Revenue

Madam Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.