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House of Commons Hansard #121 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was moved.

Topics

Gasoline PricingOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke North Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, two months ago, the Minister of Finance, here in the House, proposed to the provinces that they work together to find solutions to this problem.

However, as far as I know, the minister did not get many calls from the Quebec minister of finance.

We have a situation where we are trying to work toward giving significant relief to Canadian consumers. To do that we have to have the provinces involved at the table, not just saying things but actually being part of the solution.

Youth JusticeOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Randy White Reform Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians have been demanding changes to the Young Offenders Act for well over a decade now. After seven years, the government brings in minor changes which will not satisfy young people, the police, victims, or anyone else in the country.

Why is it that the government refuses to bring in substantive changes to the Young Offenders Act?

Youth JusticeOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member and many others in the House know, we have been debating the issue of youth justice in the country for two and one-half years.

As part of our new youth justice strategy we have new youth justice legislation. It is before the House for debate now. Unfortunately there have been those who have attempted, dare I say, to distort or obstruct the process of honest debate on all sides of the House.

I would say to the hon. member that on this side of the House we believe we have a balanced package.

Youth JusticeOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Randy White Reform Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, let me give the House an idea of what the minister thinks is balanced.

Left out of this are changes such as allowing young offenders' names to be published when they commit violent crimes, carryover of youth records to adult criminal records, and allowing young offenders to include ages 10 to 15 years.

The Canadian Alliance would bring in these particular changes. Why will the Liberal government not? Maybe it is time we had an election to see who is closer in touch with the people.

Youth JusticeOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member is suggesting that we should criminalize 10-year old children, we on this side of the House profoundly disagree with him.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Bloc Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is showing tremendous insensitivity to the plight of people who have been at the mercy of its EI regime for years now.

But the governing party paid the price throughout eastern Canada in the 1997 election.

Does the minister understand that in these resource regions there are many more seasonal workers without jobs than jobs available and that this has nothing to do with their willingness to work but that it is a simple question of the absence of available jobs for them? Period.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Brant Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House we believe that the best employment insurance program is a job.

Thanks to our interventions and our partnerships across the country, we are making progress. Two million more Canadians are working today than were working when we were elected in 1993.

Having said that, I have had the pleasure of sitting down with representatives of seasonal workers from Newfoundland, the interior of British Columbia, New Brunswick and Quebec. We are looking at their proposals and if the employment insurance program needs to be improved, we will make changes.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health has announced the government's intention to develop a new regulatory process for Canadians to access marijuana for medical purposes. Some Canadians who suffer with illnesses like AIDS, cancer and other conditions already have access through the current process.

I would like the Minister of Health to outline for us what he is proposing to improve the system for the future because Canadians who are suffering today need this.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, since last June when I announced in the House that we would make marijuana available on compassionate grounds for medical purposes, Health Canada has allowed 70 persons to use marijuana in that way.

Since that time we have had the benefit of a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal with respect to the exercise of discretion. We announced last week that we have the intention of creating a set of regulations which will be in place we hope by next summer to put on a formal basis the criteria and the circumstances under which that discretion will be exercised, compassion for the sick.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith Reform South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has finally made a commitment to return some of the money that it removed from health care but it still cannot get its priorities straight. Although the Liberals will not be increasing the transfers for health and social services until next year, they have lots of money to advertise how wonderful they are at spending taxpayers' money on health care.

Can the minister please explain why the government is spending money on advertising and not on health care?

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Allan Rock Liberal Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, first let me welcome the hon. member to her new role as the health critic for the Canadian Alliance. It is not a position that kept her predecessor very busy. In fact we did not get many questions on health from the Alliance at all. It is a little self-conscious about its position on an issue about which Canadians feel so strongly.

I am delighted that her first question allows me the opportunity to talk about the extraordinary agreement reached among 14 governments just a few days ago of over $23 billion in additional transfers to renew and restore Canadian health care across the country.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith Reform South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, we need more doctors. We need more specialists. We need more nurses. We need more hospital beds. What do the Liberals give us? They give us more advertising.

When will the government put a priority on health care rather than on its public relations exercises?

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the member is new on the job. I think she has missed the central point.

The central point is a historic agreement. All heads of government in the country put on paper common ground with respect not only to substantial increases in funding, but a concrete action plan toward shared priorities, including more doctors and nurses, better equipment, information technology and an accountability system to make sure taxpayers know how that money is spent. That is a great achievement.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie NDP Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

Earlier the minister was asked what his long term plan was for dealing with the situation at Burnt Church and the other consequences of the Marshall decision and he did not answer the question. He referred to the 29 agreements that he has signed with bands in the area but what he never says is that these agreements will expire in March. We have a right to know and the Canadian public has a right to know what is the minister's long term plan, looking beyond the expiry of those agreements and the very difficult situation that will still obtain in that particular area of Canada.

What is the minister's long term plan and will he share it with the House of Commons and the Canadian public?

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for his question.

As you know, Mr. Speaker, the federal government made a commitment of $160 million as an initial investment in bringing the aboriginal community to participate in the fisheries. That is working well. We are once again talking to the aboriginal community on a band by band basis to start working on it next year.

At the same time, my colleague the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development is looking at a process with all the Atlantic policy congress chiefs to consider the long term issue because the Marshall decision goes beyond fishing. It says fishing, gathering and hunting. He is working on the long term issue and the larger, broader agenda. I am making sure we are working with individual—

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Winnipeg—Transcona.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie NDP Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I hope the government realizes that what is happening in Burnt Church is symptomatic of a larger dissatisfaction on the part of aboriginal people across Canada with the way the government has dealt with the aboriginal file and all the outstanding claims with respect to land, et cetera.

What is the government's response today to the call by the churches for the establishment of an independent aboriginal land rights commission? This is something we have been pushing for and others have been pushing for. It seems to me that this would be a big step in the right direction to restore some confidence on the part of aboriginal people across Canada that this government indeed intends to move on this particular file.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault LiberalMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I think it is well known that the government has made an offer to the Atlantic first nations not once, not twice, not three times, but four times to come to the negotiating table.

It really takes more than just our government. It takes the provincial government and it takes the first nations. We wait for them when they are ready to come to the table to talk about aboriginal and treaty rights.

VietnamOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Sarkis Assadourian Liberal Brampton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Asia-Pacific.

Recently Brampton resident Tran Thi Cam returned to Canada following her release from prison in Vietnam.

We all agree that this ordeal has been a terrible tragedy for the family and has set back our relations with Vietnam.

Could the Secretary of State for Asia-Pacific tell us how the government intends to move forward from this terrible tragedy?

VietnamOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Richmond B.C.

Liberal

Raymond Chan LiberalSecretary of State (Asia-Pacific)

Mr. Speaker, I personally have been working on this file for a few years for Mrs. Tran. Since the terrible tragedy of the execution of her daughter, Canada has acted firmly and strongly against the Vietnamese government.

As a result the top leaders of Vietnam appreciate the problems they have in their country. Also they regret all their actions. They have fulfilled all the conditions we have set out. In particular now there is greater co-operation between Toronto policemen and the Vietnamese government on drug trafficking.

Post-Secondary EducationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Dubé Progressive Conservative Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government has not only taken a scalpel to our Canadian health care system, it has also gutted funding for post-secondary education. For example, the U.S. federal government invests $500 per post-secondary education student. The Liberal government in Ottawa invests only $144 per post-secondary education student.

Will the Prime Minister change his attitude toward post-secondary education and start investing sufficient funding so that this country can be a leader again?

Post-Secondary EducationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa South Ontario

Liberal

John Manley LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to respond to the question. It offers me the opportunity to highlight the advances we have made.

We have increased the funding for the university granting councils. We have created the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and have introduced 2,000 21st century research chairs which will make Canada the envy of the world. We have expanded health research through the Canadian institutes of health research and have made the networks of centres of excellence a permanent program.

There has not been a government in the history of Canada with as proud a record on post-secondary education as this one.

Post-Secondary EducationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Dubé Progressive Conservative Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, the minister forgot to mention the enormous debts of the students going to university today. That is what he forgot.

According to a report by the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, college and university campuses throughout the country are in terrible shape because of the tremendous lack of infrastructure funding. It estimates the cost of urgently required work at more than $1.2 billion.

Is the minister responsible for infrastructure prepared to create an infrastructure program for Canada's college and university campuses in order to meet the urgent needs?

Post-Secondary EducationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, the reason we now have an infrastructure program is that, through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, municipalities across the country have asked the government to create a municipal infrastructure program.

This is where most citizens' priorities lie, with a special emphasis on green infrastructures, because air and water quality are of vital importance to all Canadians, and this is where our government must place its priority.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

September 25th, 2000 / 2:55 p.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Reform Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, there seems to be no end to the Liberal shameless vote buying with other people's money. Now that he is about to call an election, the Prime Minister has decided to increase EI payments to seasonal workers who already earn a comfortable annual income.