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House of Commons Hansard #44 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was drugs.

Topics

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge Ontario

Liberal

Dan McTeague LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I understand the hon. member is interested in trying to rephrase his question over and over again. There is no doubt that no one along that line has been refused into this country, certainly as an individual.

As for the question of a representative of a particular government, the government has a very strong statement about that. The hon. member is aware of that and we are prepared to stand by what we believe in.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Duncan Canadian Alliance Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister met with the Dalai Lama only when it became painfully obvious that Canadians insisted that he do so. The meeting was not going to happen because of objections from China. Meanwhile, the government refuses to even endorse observer status for Taiwan at the WHO despite a majority vote last year by MPs from every party in this House.

When will the Prime Minister end the hypocrisy and pursue a Canadian position toward Taiwan rather than complying with the objections from Beijing?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge Ontario

Liberal

Dan McTeague LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it will not be objections from the hon. member or his party that we will respond to. It is very clear that what the opposition is really saying is that they are rather upset that the Prime Minister met with the Dalai Lama because it was a very important thing for us as Canadians to do and the Prime Minister did it in a way that I think most Canadians recognized as important.

As for the question of Taiwan, it is very clear that the hon. member has a particular agenda. It is obvious that he is not aware of the international ramifications but perhaps it may be because he believes that this somehow will be an important election issue. We believe otherwise.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Duncan Canadian Alliance Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, Taiwan is our fourth largest trading partner in Asia and yet last summer its foreign minister was not even allowed a transit visit to Canada. Taiwan respects human rights, democracy and the rule of law but the government continues to marginalize it.

The Prime Minister is adding to the international democratic deficit. When will the Prime Minister stop worrying about opposition from Beijing and treat Taiwan with the respect it deserves?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge Ontario

Liberal

Dan McTeague LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, what part of the United Nations recognition is he talking about with respect to the WHO? He knows very well that the United Nations has a position on this. We respect the position of the United Nations and it is clear that the hon. member ought to look at that from time to time.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said he would bring up the mad cow issue when he meets with President Bush.

Does the Prime Minister intend to limit his approach only to aspects that affect farmers in the west, or does he also intend to bring up aspects that specifically affect dairy farmers in Quebec who are having problems exporting cull?

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister will be dealing with a broad range of issues with the President. Those directly involving the trade position between Canada and the United States, that trade is worth something in the order of $1.5 billion to $2 billion per day flowing back and forth across the border. It is hugely important on both sides.

The hon. member may rest assured that the Prime Minister has the entire spectrum of Canadian interests in mind, and I am very pleased to see that agriculture is very high on his agenda.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour, QC

Mr. Speaker, more specifically, does the Prime Minister intend to ask for the embargo to be lifted, not only on calves, but also on animals older than 30 months? This affects farmers in Quebec in particular.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian position is that the science is clear. The regulatory process has been fully and conscientiously completed by Canada. We have complied with all of the international standards. We believe the border for our beef and our live cattle should be open, period, 100%.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dick Harris Canadian Alliance Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is despite the government's bungling that our softwood industry has just won a key decision by the NAFTA dispute resolution panel. It ruled that U.S. lumber producers have not suffered injury from Canadian exports.

When the Prime Minister visits with George Bush, will he demand, not wish, not hope, but demand that billions in illegal softwood penalties imposed on our producers be returned immediately to our softwood producers? The workers and their families demand it, not wish it.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia Manitoba

Liberal

John Harvard LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we are very happy with the NAFTA panel decision today because it confirms what we have been saying all along, that our industry does not pose a threat to its U.S. counterpart.

What we ultimately want is free trade in softwood lumber, and the decision made by the NAFTA panel today takes us in that direction. We hope, as a government, that the U.S. will respect the NAFTA panel decision.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dick Harris Canadian Alliance Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is our party that has always demanded that the softwood dispute problem be resolved through litigation. The key NAFTA ruling today proves that we were right and that the government's continuous attempts at end runs around the process were wrong.

Will the government stop its band-aid approach to the softwood lumber dispute and let the established resolution process continue to win this dispute for our softwood industry?

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia Manitoba

Liberal

John Harvard LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I think it would be fair to say that today's decision from the NAFTA panel constitutes the winning of one battle for us but we have not won the war. We will continue our efforts.

The Prime Minister and Minister of International Trade are in Washington today. They will continue their best efforts to resolve this issue. We are involved with all the stakeholders, the workers, the provinces, the communities and, ultimately, our goal is to get free trade. We think that the decision today by the NAFTA panel takes us in that direction.

Research and DevelopmentOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Gilbert Barrette Liberal Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, could the Minister of Industry and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec tell us about the measures undertaken to increase the ability of Quebec and Canadian universities to pursue technological research and development activities of international scope that will benefit Canadians?

Research and DevelopmentOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard LiberalMinister of Industry and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, over the years, our government has invested in excess of $13 billion in research, precisely to help our universities to be among the top institutions at the international level.

This week, for example, the Canada Foundation for Innovation announced that the New Opportunities Fund for new members of the teaching staff will provide $30 million for projects. Once again, researchers at the Université du Québec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue will benefit from this initiative and conduct a research project relating to silviculture and wildlife management.

Congratulations to these researchers.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Progressive Conservative Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government has failed to protect all the port cities of this country. First it removed the port police, then it cut back on harbour pilots and now most federal ports are being left out of that new national security plan.

Ports are natural access points, like airports or border crossings, yet the government has practically ignored them. Why is the government exposing our communities to such risks?

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is very nice to hear the opposition finally acknowledge that ports are important.

The Government of Canada has introduced a six point marine security plan which in fact illustrates our continued commitment to better detect, assess and report with respect to marine threats.

As I have said in the House, marine facility security is an important part of the national security policy and in the coming days or weeks I will announce a marine facility program that will assist ports in meeting that security requirement.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Progressive Conservative Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, I just hope that the hon. minister knows that the port of Saint John has the highest tides in the world and cutting back on the pilots and port police does not help.

If Canada becomes the target of an attack, it will happen where we least expect it and when our guard is down. The attackers will not go to Halifax, Montreal or Vancouver when those ports are heavily defended. They will strike where our defences are low, at one of the ports that the government has totally forgotten about, such as the port of Saint John.

How can the minister defend a plan that leaves so many--

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Transport.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the international ship and port facilities security code, which will take effect July 1, is a code that we will meet. The port facilities in this country will meet that particular standard. We have in fact gone beyond that standard and have established a North American standard. The government will participate in assisting our ports and ports facilities in meeting that international requirement.

As I said, in the coming days we will be making an announcement which will assist ports and ports facilities in meeting that standard.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, we can see right through the Prime Minister's little game. In Washington, he will not talk about the missile defence shield or the expansion of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Why? Because he has already made up his mind. As for softwood lumber, he was looking for an agreement at any cost. Fortunately, the NAFTA ruling was issued. As regards the mad cow issue, he is looking for a solution that will benefit western producers, while letting Quebec producers down.

Can the government deny that the whole purpose of the Prime Minister's trip to Washington is a good photo op with George Bush and nothing more?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister of Canada is on the job every day defending and promoting the interests of Canadians. On occasion, that means going abroad and visiting foreign leaders in foreign capitals. I am very pleased to say that Canadians are extraordinarily proud of the Prime Minister on the international stage advancing the interests of Canada in the most dignified of manners.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Christian Jobin Liberal Lévis-Et-Chutes-De-La-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 27 the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness injected $690 million into the new national security policy. Over $300 million of this will be used to protect the marine sector.

I would like the Minister of Transport to tell the House whether this $300 million will be used to pay for the new security measures that will be required in ports as of July 1, 2004.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the $308 million that was announced this week by the Deputy Prime Minister to enhance marine security will enable our ports to better detect, assess and respond to marine threats. These initiatives complement the new regulations, the ISPS code, which we will meet by July 1.

As I have stated over the last couple of days, the government is working with effective marine stakeholders to ensure that their plans will be approved by July 1. I have committed to assisting marine stakeholders to ensure that they will meet the security requirements.

National DefenceOral Question Period

April 29th, 2004 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie NDP Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am tempted to ask the Liberals another question on their position on health care but it seems that they are just making it up as they go along. One day it is publicly funded, the next day it is for profit and the next day it is public delivery. We cannot keep track of it.

I will go back to the Minister of National Defence on star wars. He criticized the Conservatives and the New Democrats for having a position on star wars and national missile defence. Could he tell the House why he believes Canadians do not deserve to know the true Liberal position until after the election?