This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #98 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of National Defence.

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the actions of this government in Sudan, in international development assistance and in military initiatives in Afghanistan have enjoyed the utmost respect of governments of the western countries and the world as a whole.

Our reputation in the world is not defined by the events here in the House, but rather by the positive actions of this government in order to improve the lives of thousands of people around the world. They owe a debt to Canada. The separatists cannot stand that, but it is our doing, not theirs.

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, the international press has an influence on a country's leadership too. For a Prime Minister who was leading the G-20 internationally, his behaviour is paradoxical, to say the least, since he is helping to destroy Canada's reputation for democracy and its image abroad.

By clinging to power, he is riding roughshod over democracy and increasing the democratic deficit he had previously criticized.

Would he not agree that the surest way for him to put an end to the democratic deficit is to hold a vote on Monday? It is urgent.

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

Barrie Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll LiberalMinister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I would really challenge that comment, both the member's point of departure and her conclusions, and the reason is that this Prime Minister is renowned for the reputation of this country. That is why, wherever I go as Minister of International Cooperation, I am asked for Canadian assistance from the Canadian bar for all of our capacity building, helping countries build their human rights legislation, helping them to build the kind of democracy that Canada enjoys a reputation for, and because we have a--

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

The Speaker

The hon. member for Bruce--Grey--Owen Sound.

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

Conservative

Larry Miller Conservative Grey—Bruce—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, so far this week there have been two motions passed in this House that have been deemed to be motions of non-confidence. Both of these motions passed, yet the government refuses to recognize them as such, even going so far as to vote in favour of one of them.

This government will not honour votes passed in this House, takes away opposition days and runs all over the country spending over $1 billion per day, more than what four elections would cost every day with money that has not been approved by this Parliament.

Will the government commit to a confidence motion on Monday?

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

Noon

Trinity—Spadina Ontario

Liberal

Tony Ianno LiberalMinister of State (Families and Caregivers)

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, his party is doing cheap political tricks. As he knows, on Thursday he will have all the opportunity to ensure that Canadians will have a say. As he knows, this budget is extremely important for low income seniors, those who only receive $12,439. When fully implemented this budget will give them $433, an increase that they desperately need. I ask the opposition to support low income seniors.

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Conservative Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, the more we learn about how the government, the cabinet and the Liberal Party operate, the more Canadians lose confidence. Confidence is the bloodline of a Parliament. Once it is lost, the government is dead and finished.

Patrick Monahan said, “It will require now the matter of confidence to be tested on an expeditious and priority matter in the House of Commons”. Will the government follow Mr. Monahan's instruction and commit to a confidence vote on Monday?

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

London North Centre Ontario

Liberal

Joe Fontana LiberalMinister of Labour and Housing

Mr. Speaker, we look forward to a confidence vote on the budget on Thursday.

Let me tell members that 1.7 million households across this country in every province and territory want affordable housing.

We intend to work with the aboriginal communities, with not for profit housing, with co-op housing, with the provinces and with the private sector to make sure that we invest $1.6 billion in housing. We urge all the opposition members to support this. We thank the NDP for supporting this budget. Why can't you?

Government of CanadaOral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member knows that the Speaker is neutral in these matters.

The hon. member for Brome--Missisquoi.

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Liberal Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry. Can he tell us what action the government has taken today to ensure the future of the aerospace industry, a key sector of our economy?

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, for several months in this House I have watched the political chicanery and skullduggery from the other side. It is very ironic but not surprising that a question of profound importance to the people of Canada should come from a member on our own side.

Today this government announced yet another initiative to build the aerospace industry in this country. We are partnering with the Government of Quebec and Bombardier to ensure that its new platform C Series aircraft initiative will take place here in Canada with benefits to suppliers all across this country.

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 56.1, I move:

That, notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice, the second reading stages of Bill C-43, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 23, 2005, and Bill C-48, an act to authorize the Minister of Finance to make certain payments, shall be disposed of as follows:

  1. Any division thereon requested before the expiry of the date for consideration of government orders on Thursday, May 19, 2005, shall be deferred to that time;

  2. At the expiry of the time for consideration of Government Orders on Thursday, May 19, 2005, all questions necessary for the disposal of second reading stages of (1) Bill C-43 and (2) Bill C-48 shall be put and decided forthwith and successively, without further debate, amendment or deferral.

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. minister have the unanimous consent of the House to put this motion now?

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Under our practice, the minister must move this under motions when we get to motions in the course of routine proceedings unless he has unanimous consent.

I draw his attention to a ruling of the Chair on October 24, 2002: “Our practice is clear,” said the Speaker on that occasion:

Motions pursuant to Standing Order 56.1 should be moved under the rubric “Motions” unless there is unanimous consent to do otherwise.

The hon. member should have that opportunity in a few minutes.

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Ottawa—Vanier Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger LiberalDeputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I rise for some clarification. Standing Order 56.1(1)(a) states:

In relation to any routine motion for the presentation of which unanimous consent is required and has been denied, a Minister of the Crown may request during Routine Proceedings that the Speaker propose the said question to the House.

The Standing Orders do not specify the routine proceedings item in question and I was under the impression that we were under routine proceedings. Could the Speaker please clarify this possible contradiction?

Business of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The Standing Orders may say “during Routine Proceedings” and “Motions” is one of the items in routine proceedings when motions are normally proposed.

I have quoted the ruling that was given in 2002 on this point. I do not believe it was a new practice at that time. I believe it was based on previous decisions, but I am unable to pull those out at the moment because I do not have them with me. I did have that one, and that is why I asked for consent. As I have said, the minister will have an opportunity when we get to motions, which should happen in a few minutes.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Liberal

Raymond Simard LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to two petitions.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

John Williams Conservative Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts concerning Chapter 4, “Management of Federal Drug Benefit Programs”, of the November 2004 Report of the Auditor General of Canada. In accordance with Standing Order 109, your committee requests a government response within 120 days.

Employment Insurance ActRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Conservative Dauphin—Swan River, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-390, an act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (increase of benefits).

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to table this bill. As the House knows, the government has stolen billions of dollars from hard working Canadians. Basically, much of it has ended up in a slush fund.

Employment Insurance ActRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I remind the hon. member that suggesting that government steals money is not in order. He is introducing a bill. He will want to restrain himself in his choice of words.

Employment Insurance ActRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Conservative Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, I do retract the word stolen. The government probably misplaced it.

Unfortunately, the EI plan is supposed to be insurance. What ended up happening was the government overtaxed hard-working Canadians.

This bill will rectify that and give more money back to hard-working Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Heritage Hunting and Fishing Protection ActRoutine Proceedings

May 13th, 2005 / 12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Inky Mark Conservative Dauphin—Swan River, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-391, an act to recognize and protect Canada's hunting and fishing heritage.

Mr. Speaker, this bill should have been introduced in the House probably 20 years ago.

On the issue of recognition, hunting and fishing has been a long tradition of this country for all Canadians, for those who came here before the Europeans. Under the government we will no longer have hunting or fishing if we keep going down the path we are going right now.

It is a great honour and I look forward to passing this bill in the House.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)