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House of Commons Hansard #38 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was judges.

Topics

Question No. 146Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, there are no internal investigations under way into ''leaked information" to American authorities by the RCMP. There has been no finding by Justice O’Connor, that information was inappropriately "leaked" to American authorities. On the contrary, Justice O'Connor endorsed RCMP information sharing with the American authorities.

Question No. 152Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy Liberal Charlottetown, PE

With regard to the EcoAuto program under Environment Canada: (a) how many applications have been filed since October 1, 2007; (b) how many applications have been approved; (c) how many applications have been denied; (d) how long is the average length to receive notification of the approval or denial of an application; (e) what models of automobiles have been applied for; (f) what models of cars have been approved for the EcoAuto rebate; (g) what regions have applied for the rebate; and (h) what is the percentage of the rebate deemed eligible for each purchase?

Question No. 152Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the ecoauto rebate program encourages Canadians to buy or lease fuel efficient vehicles. The program is delivered in partnership, with Transport Canada as the program lead, and Service Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada, as the delivery arm of the program, handling public calls and processing applications.

In response to (a), as of January 16, 2008, 42,270 applications had been received. Canadians who have bought, or leased, for 12 months or more, an eligible vehicle as of March 20, 2007, may apply for a rebate through the ecoauto rebate program.

In response to (b), as of January 16, 2008, 13,190 applications hae been approved and over $15.6 million in rebates had been issued.

In response to (c), as of January 16, 2008, 684 applications had been deemed ineligible.

In response to (d), the program was announced in March 2007 and the government’s commitment to start issuing rebate cheques in fall 2007 has been met. The application form has been available since October 1, 2007.

Since the launch of the program, a large volume of applications have been received. All efforts are being made to process the applications as quickly as possible and measures have been implemented to minimize the requirement for follow-up with applicants about missing or incomplete information.

Measures have also been put in place to ensure due diligence to adequately input, track, review and validate the applications prior to approval.

Information regarding the status of applications can be obtained by calling 1-866-506-6804.

In response to (e), applications have been received for models of cars on the list of eligible vehicles as well as others that were not eligible.

In response to (f), the list of vehicles that are eligible under ecoauto can be found at www.ecoaction.gc.ca/ecoAUTO and only those vehicles would be approved for a rebate.

In response to (g), all Canadian provinces and territories have applications submitted to the ecoauto rebate program.

In response to (h), the ecoauto rebate program is providing a cash incentive to Canadians to help the environment by buying or leasing more fuel efficient vehicles. The rebate is based on fuel consumption ratings.

There are different rebate criteria for passenger cars and light trucks since consumers have different needs and shop for different categories of vehicles. The intention of this measure is to encourage consumers to purchase the most fuel-efficient vehicles while still fulfilling their individual needs.

Current vehicle models qualifying for the rebate include some hybrid electric vehicles and highly energy efficient vehicles. The list of eligible vehicles includes: new passenger cars with a combined city/highway fuel consumption of 6.5 litres per 100 kilometres or less; new minivans, sport utility vehicles and other light trucks with a combined city/highway fuel consumption of 8.3 litres per 100 kilometres or less; and new flex-fuel vehicles, i.e., vehicles equipped by manufacturers to operate on gasoline or a blend of 85% ethanol/15% gasoline, with a combined city/highway E85 fuel consumption rating of 13.0 litres per 100 kilometres or less.

Question No. 153Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough NDP Halifax, NS

With respect to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: (a) what is the current status of federal and provincial negotiations in regard to Canada's ratification of the document; (b) what stage of the ratification process has the Convention reached; (c) has the government consulted with the provinces on their position in regard to ratifying the treaty; (d) what position have the provinces taken; (e) what, if any, amendments must be made to provincial legislation in order to accommodate the ratification of the Convention; (f) are such amendments being made; (g) are federal-provincial negotiations ongoing; (h) what negotiations have taken place; (i) who is conducting these discussions, mediations or negotiations; (j) what is the timeline to complete these negotiations; (k) which government departments are involved in these negotiations; (l) has the government consulted with non-governmental organizations during the ratification process; (m) what advice has the government received from agents of civil society; (n) is the government studying the unsigned optional protocol; and (o) what is the timeline for these considerations?

Question No. 153Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Beauce Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, hereinafter referred to as the convention, is a significant advancement in international law concerning the rights of persons with disabilities. In being among the first countries to sign the convention, the Government of Canada demonstrated its leadership with respect to disability issues and the importance Canada attaches to the rights of persons with disabilities.

In response to (a), (b), (c) and (g), many of the areas covered by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities fall under the jurisdiction of the provinces and territories. During the negotiation of the convention at the United Nations, the Government of Canada consulted extensively with the provinces and territories and was pleased with the level of support the convention received. The process of human rights treaty ratification in Canada typically requires detailed consultation, rather than "negotiation", with provinces and territories. The Government of Canada is currently working very closely and diligently with the provinces and territories to examine the legal and policy implications of ratifying the convention.

In response to (d), (e) and (f), the provinces and territories are currently examining the legal and policy implications of the convention. Questions regarding the positions of provinces and territories are best answered by them.

In response to (i) and (k), processes for consultations with provincial and territorial governments vary. With respect to the signature and ratification of new international human rights treaties, where these treaties contain provisions that fall under provincial and territorial jurisdiction, the Government of Canada consults with provincial and territorial governments through the Continuing Committee of Officials on Human Rights, CCOHR, to verify compliance and support before signature or ratification. More information about the committee can be found on the Canadian Heritage website, http://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/pdp-hrp/canada/comite_committee_e.cfm.

In response to (j) and (o), the question of ratifying the convention is under active consideration and involves consultation with many diverse players. It is not possible at this time to set out a timeframe.

In response to (k), the following federal government departments and agencies have been engaged in discussions regarding the legal and policy implications of ratifying the convention: Justice, Heritage, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Health, Department of National Defence, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Statistics Canada, Treasury Board, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Finance, Privy Council Office, Status of Women, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Service Canada, Industry Canada, Transport Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Veterans Affairs Canada, Public Safety Canada, Canada Public Service Agency, Canadian International Development Agency, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Canada Border Services Agency, and Library and Archives Canada.

In response to (l) and (m), during the negotiation of the convention at the United Nations and prior to Canada signing the convention, NGOs were consulted and helped shape Canadian negotiating positions, including as members of Canada's delegation to the negotiations. Public views on the issue of ratification are being tracked. Further consultations are anticipated going forward.

In response to (n), the Government of Canada is focusing its attention on the convention itself at this juncture.

Question No. 162Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Ken Boshcoff Liberal Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

With respect to Environment Canada project K2A65-06-0039 which was awarded to the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) in January and February 2007: (a) what is the annual amount of funding provided by Environment Canada to the IISD; (b) what is the designated use for the funds outlined in sub-question (a); (c) what is the contract value of project K2A65-06-0039; (d) what policies are in place to ensure fairness and accountability in the Request for Proposal (RFP) process when an RFP submission is received from an organization that is also funded by Environment Canada; (e) which departments were directly involved in the decision to fund the IISD; (f) were any ministerial staff directly involved in the decision to fund the IISD and, if so, which ones; (g) which departments were directly involved in the decision to award project K2A65-06-0039 to the IISD; and (h) were any ministerial staff directly involved in the decision to award project K2A65-06-0039 to the IISD and, if so, which ones?

Question No. 162Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, In response to (a), the Government of Canada created the International Institute for Sustainable Development in 1990 with the intention that it would eventually secure the majority of its funding independently. Environment Canada was the International Institute for Sustainable Development’s primary source of funding for its first decade of operation contributing $15.6 million over 10 years to its core operating costs, until 2000. Since then, contributions to the International Institute for Sustainable Development have varied depending on how its work related to Environment Canada’s priorities.

Environment Canada is currently in the third year of the current contribution agreement with the International Institute for Sustainable Development. While the original agreement provided $1 million per year, this was reduced to $750,000 in 2007-08 to cope with the overall reductions in the department’s grants and contributions budget.

The Government of Canada contribution amounts to 16% of the International Institute for Sustainable Development’s overall funding; Environment Canada’s contribution represents 43% of the federal funding. The International Institute for Sustainable Development currently, i.e., 2007, receives additional funds from governments of other countries, 48%; philanthropic foundations and the private sector, 18%; United Nations agencies, 7%; and international organizations, 5%.

In response to (b), half the funds transferred to the International Institute for Sustainable Development fund a directed research program, examining sustainable development issues which assist in advancing the department’s priorities. The remaining half is channeled toward the International Institute for Sustainable Development’s base funding and is used to assist with core operating costs. The Canadian International Development Agency also provides core funding to the International Institute for Sustainable Development.

In response to (c), the contract value of project K2A65-06-0039 is $132,946.00.

In response to (d), in order to assure fairness and accountability, the subject contract was competed, evaluated and subsequently awarded in accordance with the procedures set out in the Treasury Board contracting policy.

In response to (e), Environment Canada made the decision to enter into a funding agreement with the International Institute for Sustainable Development. Departments consulted in advance of the decision were the Canadian International Development Agency and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

In response to (f), negotiation of the current Environment Canada-International Institute for Sustainable Development contribution agreement was conducted by departmental officials without involvement of ministerial staff. In July 2005, the contribution agreement was signed by the Minister of the Environment, on the recommendation of the Deputy Minister of Environment Canada.

In response to (g), Environment Canada was the only department involved in the decision to award project K2A65-06-0039.

In response to (h), no ministerial staff was involved in the award of the subject contract.

Question No. 163Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Liberal Brant, ON

With regard to a water treatment facilities: (a) is the government working on providing funding for a water treatment facility for residents of Six Nations of the Grand River Territory and, if so, how much will be provided; and (b) when will the government provide funding for a water treatment facility in Ohsweken and what is the concrete timeline for the implementation and distribution of this funding?

Question No. 163Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, as I, as the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, reiterated on January 17, 2008, when launching the latest progress report on the plan of action for drinking water in first nations communities, the Government of Canada remains committed to ensuring that all first nations communities have access to safe potable water. In July 2006, Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation made a preliminary project submission to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada for a new water treatment plant. In September 2006, the first nation agreed to engage in a value engineering study to review all servicing costs prior to finalizing a revised preliminary project submission.

A meeting to review the results of the value engineering team’s recommendations was to be held on January 21, 2008. Due to a change in political leadership at Six Nations, the meeting has been postponed, and will be rescheduled after February 6, 2008. The timing and costs of this project will be established based on the results of this process.

Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, if Questions Nos. 9, 66, 88, 106, 108, 113, 119, 121, 122, 123, 124, 126, 128, 130, 131, 132, 133, 138, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 154, 155, 156, 157 and 164 could be made orders for return, these returns would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 9Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Catherine Bell NDP Vancouver Island North, BC

With regard to export of bulk water and intra-basin diversions from Canada: (a) what is the current policy of the government; (b) has there been any change to this policy since January 23, 2006 and, if so, what changes have been made; (c) how many applications for the export of bulk water have been received by the government, listing of the requestors and the municipality within which they are located, and what is the current status of these requests; (d) in terms of bulk water exports and the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) negotiations, (i) in what context has bulk water been discussed, (ii) what is the substance of our trading partners demands, (iii) have any agreements, either in preliminary or final form, been reached in this regard with corporations or foreign governments; (e) what did the Minister's briefing book to the SPP meetings say about bulk water; (f) are there other trade discussions currently on going that involve bulk water exports or intra-basin diversions and, if so, (i) what is the substance of these discussions, (ii) what is being asked of the government, (iii) what is the current state of the negotiations; (g) what legal advice has the government received regarding the export of bulk water from Canada; and (h) what scientific advice has the government received in regard to the export of bulk water and intra-basin diversions from Canada?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 66Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Catherine Bell NDP Vancouver Island North, BC

With respect to the $6.4 million reduction in grants to voluntary sector organizations for adult literacy in the 2007-2008 Main Estimates, broken down between non-profit and for-profit groups: (a) which voluntary sector organizations have received funding from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) from September 2006 to May 2007 and from which province or territory those organizations or entities are located; (b) what was the dollar amount for each grant that each organization received from September 2006 to September 2007; (c) on which dates the grants were awarded to the voluntary sector organizations that received funding from HRSDC from September 2006 to September 2007; (d) what are the expiration dates for the grants that were awarded to voluntary sector organizations that received funding from HRSDC from September 2006 to September 2007; (e) in what way were evaluation criteria modified mid-way through the application process, and whose decision was it to make this change; (f) which organizations received reduced funding, including to reduction to zero, for the 2007-2008 fiscal year compared with the 2006-2007 fiscal year; (g) is the government aware of how those organizations have addressed this shortfall in their budget, providing details, if so; (h) how does the government explain the reduction of funding for voluntary sector organizations (as stated on p. 14-9 of the 2007-2008 Estimates), but then the increase in funding for voluntary sector organizations (as stated on p. 14-11 of the 2007-2008 Estimates); and (i) what is the detailed breakdown as to the difference between the two line items in (h)?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 88Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

January 28th, 2008 / 3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Don Bell Liberal North Vancouver, BC

What was the justification for the policy that the Minister of Finance announced on October 31, 2006 with regard to income trusts?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 106Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow NDP Trinity—Spadina, ON

With regard to Canada’s immigration system: (a) how many Canadians have family members who have been deported since 2000, listed by each year, to 2006, and projected into 2007; (b) how many individuals have been deported from Canada since the year 2000, listed by each year, to 2006, and projected into 2007; (c) how many of these individuals had been in Canada for five or more years; (d) what is the cost of deporting these individuals per year, since 2000, listed by departments, including the court cost; (e) how many of these individuals had filed appeals to Federal Court; (f) how many of these individuals were ordered removed with their children, provide a list of the ages of all those under the age of 18 and how many of each age group were ordered removed; (g) how many of these individuals had Canadian born children, and how many of these Canadian children have been removed out of Canada and what are their ages; (h) how many of these individuals left Canadian-born children in Canada when removed; (i) how many of these individuals have immediate family (as defined by Citizenship and Immigration under the Family Class) in Canada, and how many individuals have non-family class relatives in Canada; (j) how many of these individuals were married to a Canadian citizen while in Canada; (k) how many of these individuals were ordered removed to countries for which the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade has issued any travel warnings; (l) how many of these individuals have returned to Canada since their ordered removal, provide a list of countries for which these individuals returned to Canada from after their removal; (m) how many of these individuals returned to Canada since their ordered removal with children under the age of 18, and how many of these children were born in Canada; and (n) what immigration categories did these individuals apply under when they arrived in Canada originally and when they return?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 108Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow NDP Trinity—Spadina, ON

With respect to crime prevention programs: (a) what studies and evaluations have been undertaken, requested or commissioned by the government with respect to budget cuts to social programs and the rise in violent crime since 1995; (b) which studies are related specifically to the rise in violent youth crime; (c) what individuals, department, or organization undertook these studies; (d) what is the cost of these studies; (e) what are the findings and recommendations of these studies; (f) how many projects have been funded through the Crime Prevention Action Fund since 2000; (g) how many of these projects were pilot projects, and how long did each last for; (h) how long were the projects funded for; (i) how many and which projects have been funded in the city of Toronto since 2000; (j) how much has been invested in the Youth Gang Prevention Fund every year since 2000; (k) which programs have been funded through the Youth Gang Prevention Fund in the city of Toronto since 2000 and how much was granted in each case; (l) how many of these projects were pilot projects and how long did each last; (m) what is the annual funding for the National Centre for Crime Prevention; (n) how much was cut or re-allocated from the refocusing of some funding from the National Centre for Crime Prevention in the 2006 budget; (o) where did the 2006 budget cuts come from and which projects or organizations were cut; (p) what was the purpose, goal, and outcome of the refocusing of funding to the National Centre for Crime Prevention; (q) how many programs were funded by the National Centre for Crime Prevention in every year since 2000; (r) how many programs were funded through the national drug strategy in every year since 2000; (s) how many of the programs have been evaluated in the past four years; (t) how many young people received services as a result of this funding; (u) how many of these evaluations were positive; (v) of all the programs that are evaluated as having positive outcomes, how many programs have since lost their funding; (w) how many young people lost their opportunities for services as a result; and (x) how many neighbourhoods were affected as a result and what impact did these lost programs have on the crime rate in these neighbourhoods?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 113Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Liberal Davenport, ON

With respect to programs and funding: (a) which accounts, budgets and envelopes used less than 50 per cent of their allotted funds last year and how much was actually spent; (b) when evaluating a program that did not spend either most or its entire budget in the past year, how are the levels of funding determined for subsequent years; and (c) what incentives are there for programs to not spend leftover funds on superfluous expenditures in order to re-secure the same higher funding levels the next year?

(Return tabled)

Question No. 119Questions Passed as Orders for ReturnsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash NDP Parkdale—High Park, ON

With regard to federal spending in the federal riding of Parkdale—High Park, what has been the total federal spending in each of the last five years by the following departments, described by individual line item and program: (a) Canadian Heritage; (b) Human Resources and Social Development Canada; (c) Veteran's Affairs; (d) Infrastructure Canada; (e) Transport Canada; (f) National Defence; (g) Industry Canada; and (h) Environment Canada?