This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #83 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was orders.

Topics

National DefenceOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Ajax—Pickering Ontario

Conservative

Chris Alexander ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Madam Speaker, it is impossible to know if the Liberal Party wants to replace the CF-18s or not. It wanted to 10 years ago, but based on today's statements, it no longer wants to do so.

We have a plan. We are working with nearly 10 allies and we will ensure that the Royal Canadian Air Force has the equipment it needs to carry out its missions. We have faith in the future in that regard.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Liberal Etobicoke North, ON

Madam Speaker, after six years, the government's sorry record on the environment stands alone.

At the World Economic Forum, the Prime Minister said, “Canada's investments in science and technology had produced poor results”. What a cheap shot at our hard-working scientists.

Now international scientists are slamming our government for turning its back on science and international agreements.

Why is the government muzzling Canadian scientists and destroying the reputation of Canada for environmental leadership?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Madam Speaker, that is very rich coming from a party whose former leader said that his party did not get the job done on climate change.

We are so proud of our team of scientists at Environment Canada and the work that they do. In fact, last year I believe they conducted over 1,000 interviews with the media. We continue to support the work they are doing at Environment Canada. We are proud of our international leadership in this area.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer NDP Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Madam Speaker, we know the Department of Veterans Affairs says no a lot to its veterans.

I would like the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs to stand in her place and look in the camera at 90-year-old Bedford veteran, Ted Shiner. All Mr. Shiner is asking from the Government of Canada is for a little help with housekeeping and with his feet.

The government can find $50 million to sprinkle like pixie dust through the riding of Parry Sound—Muskoka but it cannot find enough shekels in the pot to help a 90-year-old veteran with housekeeping so he can stay in his own home with a little more dignity.

The government is fully aware of this file. There is no privacy to be concerned about as Mr. Shiner has given his permission to talk about it.

I would like the parliamentary secretary to stand in this place and tell Mr. Shiner why he was denied VIP service.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mississauga—Brampton South Ontario

Conservative

Eve Adams ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Madam Speaker, while I cannot comment on a specific case, I can assure the member that veterans and their families are a priority for our government.

The veterans independence program provides disabled veterans with housekeeping assistance so they can remain in their homes longer.

Perhaps the member opposite might want to commence voting in favour of some of our government measures on behalf of veterans. For instance, the member opposite might be ashamed of himself for voting against ex gratia payments for agent orange. He might be ashamed of himself for not voting in favour of doubling the number of post-traumatic stress disorder clinics for our veterans. He might--

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Denise Savoie

Order, please. The hon. member for Sackville--Eastern Shore.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer NDP Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Madam Speaker, with respect to the veterans independence program, the Prime Minister promised in 2005 that immediately upon forming government, every widow and widower of a World War II and Korean war veteran would get VIP, but less than 10% of that promise was fulfilled. That is why we vote against these budgets that do not meet the mandate and do not get the job done.

Harold Leduc is an honoured veteran and a member of the Veterans Review and Appeal Board. His medical and psychiatric information was scattered throughout the department in an illegal manner. My question for the government is, if it has happened within the Veterans Review and Appeal Board that medical information--

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Denise Savoie

Order. The hon. parliamentary secretary.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mississauga—Brampton South Ontario

Conservative

Eve Adams ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Madam Speaker, our government believes that any violation of our veterans' privacy is completely unacceptable. That is why over a year ago we took action to introduce a 10-point privacy action plan that ensures there are strict disciplinary measures if anyone breaks the law, and increases monitoring and access controls.

We are committed to ensuring the continued success of the privacy action plan. We will make sure that the veterans' privacy remains a priority for the government.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu NDP Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday the Minister of the Environment took part in another photo op in the U.S. and made a modest announcement to draw attention away from the Conservatives' inaction. In the last budget, the Conservatives pledged $35 million to make up for cuts to university research into weather and climate. That money never materialized.

Why do the Conservatives lack ambition and why are they not keeping their financial commitments?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Madam Speaker, in the last budget we committed almost $870 million to Canada's clean air agenda, including $252 million to support regulatory activities to address climate change sustainable development technology, but my colleague opposite voted against it.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu NDP Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Madam Speaker, the parliamentary secretary's answer does not hide the fact that yesterday's announcement with the U.S. was just another sideshow. Even Secretary of State Clinton admits this effort is not an answer to the climate crisis, that it is meant to complement, not supplant, the other actions we must be taking.

Instead of action, the government has killed the eco-energy program, pulled us out of Kyoto, and lobbied for its oil and gas buddies. When will the minister take science seriously and take real action on climate change?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Madam Speaker, what the no development party has done is voted against the eco-energy retrofit program. It has voted against any sort of measure that makes sense to support our energy sector from a sustainable development perspective, and it lobbies against Canadian jobs.

We have a sector by sector robust regulatory program for greenhouse gas emissions. We also support the over 500,000 people who work in our energy sector. That is something my colleague opposite cannot say.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Bob Zimmer Conservative Prince George—Peace River, BC

Madam Speaker, I understand that the NDP has sent the leadership candidate from Skeena—Bulkley Valley to the northern gateway hearings today. I am disappointed by its anti-trade, anti-jobs agenda. The no development party is bad for jobs and economic growth.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment please tell the House what the government's position is on diversifying trade and Canada's role as a stable, secure and reliable energy source for the world?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his understanding of the importance of the over 500,000 jobs in this country and what that means for social programs, what that means for having Canada as a world leader in the global economy.

Our government is committed to the sustainable development of our resource sector and ensuring that we have a robust environmental protection plan in a time of economic growth. Our government is committed to making the investments necessary to grow trade in the Asia-Pacific countries. We will, unlike our colleagues opposite, stand up for our energy sector.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Malcolm Allen NDP Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, this past Wednesday, the agriculture committee learned that only 2% of food imported into Canada is actually inspected. Yet 100% of the products that we produce and send abroad are inspected. Canadians expected, in fact believed, that all imported food was inspected. The agriculture committee now knows that is not true.

What is the government going to do to ensure that imported food is inspected so that Canadian consumers will feel safe when they feed their families?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Madam Speaker, the member should know that the CFIA enforces the same rigorous food safety standards on imported food as it does for domestic food.

I can give him some examples of what we have done to improve our import system. He should know this if he is on the agriculture committee.

Our recent budget includes an additional $100 million over five years to enhance food safety. We have delivered $223 million to the food safety action plan. To improve controls on imported food, we eliminated the 72 hour notification of inspections of meat imports. We have established an import surveillance team to perform 480 border blitzes.

Madam Speaker, I could go on, but I know my time is running out.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Malcolm Allen NDP Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, the parliamentary secretary should know that actually there are no CFIA inspectors at the border. CBSA is responsible to do that and it does not know how to do it. The $100 million was actually for exported food, not imported food.

The reality is we are not testing the products. In fact, we do not require that potable water be used on washed vegetables that are imported into this country.

We need to restore consumers' confidence in the system. Will the government commit today to ensuring that the CFIA budget is not cut in the next budget round?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Madam Speaker, something the NDP does not know how to do is to apologize. The member opposite should stand up and represent his caucus and apologize for the sleazy online campaign that they have been conducting.

In terms of food safety, I have quotes on that. I even have a quote from the member for Malpeque, who said, “I personally believe our food is safe in Canada”.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Madam Speaker, we learned today that rising inflation and higher gas prices are pinching family pocketbooks even further.

In Toronto a dismal job market means families just cannot keep up. The city has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. Those who do find work get stuck with low wage, part-time jobs that just do not support families. Yet all the government has to offer them is a failed jobs plan.

When will the government finally wake up and help Toronto families?

EmploymentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeMinister of State (Finance)

Madam Speaker, if the NDP members spent more time worrying about Canadian jobs than they do on the Internet with their sleazy tricks, they would actually know that 90% of those 610,000 net new jobs are full time, many of which are in the community to which he is referring. Those jobs are all across this country. Those people are happy that our government has put in place policies that create jobs.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Madam Speaker, the government has not created jobs in Toronto, and the numbers back that up.

People in my riding know and live it every single day. Higher prices and fewer good jobs mean more struggles for Toronto families, but the government is too busy being a cheerleader for Rob Ford to notice.

Why will the government not finally be a cheerleader for Toronto families? Why will it not introduce a jobs plan to get families back to work, create good jobs and secure the economic recovery?

EmploymentOral Questions

February 17th, 2012 / 11:50 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeMinister of State (Finance)

Madam Speaker, I am certain that I have never been accused of being a cheerleader.

However, I am actually a cheerleader for the Canadian economy, because it is something to be very proud of. It is the envy of the world right now. The reason is we have put forward two consecutive budgets that are focused on jobs and growing the economy, two budgets which the opposition voted against. Then those members have the audacity to stand up and ask where the job plan is. It is the same plan they voted against.

PensionsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Liberal Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Madam Speaker, the office of the Chief Actuary projects that the federal elderly benefits cost in proportion to the GDP, which is currently 2.2%, will reach a peak of 3.1% of the GDP in 2030 and will decline afterward. The Parliamentary Budget Officer's projections are similar.

Does the Minister of Finance agree with these numbers? Will the federal elderly benefits reach a maximum of about 3.2% in the next two decades before declining?

PensionsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Madam Speaker, the Parliamentary Budget Officer is entitled to his opinion, whatever it may be on a given day, but we will deal with the facts.

We know that as the population ages and fewer people are left in the workplace to pay into OAS, it will become unsustainable. That is why we have to take action now so that today's seniors have their OAS benefits and future generations get them as well. That is our responsibility, one which we take very seriously.