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House of Commons Hansard #73 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was sector.

Topics

EmploymentOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Denise Savoie

Order, please. The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, although I sympathize with all Canadians who have lost their jobs, the fact of the matter is, there was an increase of a couple of thousand jobs in this last month's report.

We do have more to do. Unfortunately, as we move forward trying to increase those job numbers and trying to create an environment so that business can create those jobs, the Liberals keep proposing things like the doubling of the CPP, increasing corporate taxes and a carbon tax. All of these things would damage our environment to allow job creation.

We will not do that. We will continue on this plan that is working for Canadians.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Liberal Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Madam Speaker, I am looking at a picture of the Prime Minister in a locomotive in London, Ontario, and he is waving. He must be waving to the 450 employees who were just let go when the plant was shut down there.

It is like Groundhog Day. The minister over there saw her shadow yesterday, so for the next six weeks we will get the same spin, the same talking points, the same drivel.

We cannot feed our families on that. Would the minister please give us something other than baloney? People are hurting and those on that bench over there do not care.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, the people of Canada elected this strong, stable, Conservative government to bring them out of that misery that unfortunately was perpetuated by a Liberal government that failed to take steps to allow us to weather a recession better than any country across the world.

Our government will continue to put forward measures, like the hiring credit for small business, that will allow us to sustain those jobs.

We do sympathize with those who have lost their jobs, but we are creating jobs. We need the Liberals to get on board to help us do that.

Government CommunicationsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Liberal Halifax West, NS

Madam Speaker, the latest victim of the Conservatives' obsession with secrecy and their intolerance of dissent is the chief economic analyst at Statistics Canada.

He is the second senior official to quit because of the government's attempts to muzzle them.

Why are they so obsessed, to the point of hiring 1,500 spin doctors to control the message coming from the Prime Minister's Office? Why are they so determined to muzzle any dissenters and scare away government officials who play a vital role?

Government CommunicationsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Madam Speaker, as I said yesterday regarding Statistics Canada, I understand the individual wants to seize an opportunity to work in the private sector, since the data is free.

I want to reiterate that we thank him for his years of service in the public sector.

That being said, we have been improving the system with things like the national household survey. With regard to this, the national collection response rate is now at 69.3%, well above the target of 50%.

JusticeOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre NDP Alfred-Pellan, QC

Madam Speaker, the debate on the death penalty ended decades ago and Canadians have no interest in reopening it. What is more, before coming to power, the Prime Minister said: “The Senate is a relic of the 19th century.”

Senator Boisvenu's comments prove the Prime Minister right. The most troubling thing is that Mr. Boisvenu is authorized to sign bills on behalf of Canadians. For the last time, does the government intend to reopen the debate on the death penalty or not?

JusticeOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Madam Speaker, we have said over and over again we are not reopening this debate. Senator Boisvenu is staying in place. He will continue to be a strong advocate for victims of crime.

A soft-on-crime party like the NDP should not be attacking victims of crime. The member belongs to a party that opposes tougher sentences for violent criminals. It opposed our repeal of the faint hope clause, a clause that gave first degree murderers the chance of getting early parole.

It is about time that the member for Winnipeg Centre stood in this place and apologize for his attack on a victim of violent crime—

JusticeOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre NDP Alfred-Pellan, QC

Madam Speaker, does this attack indicate that this is indeed the Conservatives' intention? Honestly. Not only were the senator's comments completely inappropriate, but they constituted the abetting of suicide, which goes completely against current rehabilitation efforts.

Making inappropriate comments, seeing whether that shocks Canadians, then admitting having gone too far, but not apologizing: is that what it means to the Conservatives to be tough on crime?

JusticeOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Madam Speaker, I can think of nothing more inappropriate than personally attacking a victim of violent crime who lost his daughter to the actions of a repeat offender, who abducted, sexually assaulted and murdered a young, 27-year-old woman. There is no sympathy shown by the opposition for the context of those remarks, which the senator withdrew within hours of making them.

What is shocking is that the member for Winnipeg Centre has refused to stand in this place and apologize.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Denis Blanchette NDP Louis-Hébert, QC

Madam Speaker, the Conservatives continue to make partisan appointments and have even gone so far as to break the law to do so. The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities is preparing to replace a member of the board of directors of the Quebec port authority without consulting users first, as required under the Canada Marine Act.

The port's electoral college submitted names for consideration, which the minister did not even bother to look at, choosing instead to impose his preferred candidate. Why is the minister ignoring the recommendations that were made?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Madam Speaker, the normal process is now under way and an announcement will be made as soon as a decision is made.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls NDP Vaudreuil—Soulanges, QC

Madam Speaker, members will remember another incident involving the Conservatives and the Port of Quebec. Three years ago, the Department of Transport modified a press release to cover up the fact that the new CEO of the Port of Quebec did not have a university degree as the position required. We can see just how far the Conservatives are willing to go to take care of their friends.

Where is the transparency that this government has been promising since taking office six years ago?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Madam Speaker, as I just said, the process must run its course. We will make an announcement as soon as there is something to announce.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Madam Speaker, Canadians gave our government a strong mandate to keep our streets and communities safe. That is why we have introduced the safe streets and communities act and numerous other tough on crime reforms since 2006. However, the NDP member for Burnaby—New Westminster says that these reforms to increase the sentences of sex offenders and ensure that murderers are not eligible for early parole will cost $19 billion and are not worth it.

Could the Minister of Public Safety please tell the House what he thinks of this shocking statement?

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Madam Speaker, the member for Burnaby—New Westminster cites a report by a left wing think tank that has been widely discredited. The number is false. Our entire tough on crime agenda is estimated to cost $2.7 billion over five years. In fact, our costs are based on estimates of a prison population that has failed to materialize. That will mean even more savings.

The NDP's willingness to distort the facts and attempt to mislead Canadians shows how reckless the NDP is and the danger it presents to Canada's interests and Canada's victims of crime.

PensionsOral Questions

February 3rd, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alain Giguère NDP Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Madam Speaker, the Conservatives' attack on old age security shows just how out of touch with reality the government is. After six years of mismanagement, they now want to penalize Canadians who have worked and saved their whole lives. Yesterday, the NDP moved a motion to protect old age security so that all Canadians can retire in dignity.

Will the government clarify its intentions here in the House, not in Davos? Or will the government force people to wait until they turn 67 before they can collect their retirement benefits?

PensionsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Madam Speaker, the NDP is the party on the attack, and they are attacking Canadians. They say that there will be cuts, which is not true. We will not stand for that.

What we are trying to do—what we will do—is protect the old age security program for the current generation, of course, as well as for future generations. The program must be made viable; currently it is not. We will protect the old age security program.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Madam Speaker, the Public Appointments Commission was supposed to be part of the Federal Accountability Act. The secretariat was created 2,114 days ago, and since then millions has been spent, but the commission never materialized.

Under the Conservatives, patronage has gone from bad to worse. Candidates with Conservative connections land plum federal appointments. Just when integrity is needed, Conservatives choose more patronage and waste millions on phantom commissions.

When will the Conservative hypocrisy stop?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

North Vancouver B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Madam Speaker, the member opposite should know that we tried to appoint an appointments commissioner, and it was that party in the opposition that shot it down.

All appointments are done based on merit.

TransportOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Isabelle Morin NDP Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Madam Speaker, many residents of Longueuil, and Montreal in general, take public transit across the Champlain Bridge. Yet this government still refuses to confirm its plans for that sector.

Will there be designated bus lanes? Will there be light rail? Too many questions remain unanswered. On this side of the House, we know that the future hinges on improving public transit. When will the Conservatives commit to providing the people with the services they need on the Champlain Bridge? When?

TransportOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Madam Speaker, the minister has already announced plans to replace the Champlain Bridge. So we are making progress. We are examining the impact on the local environment.

As for the broader question of public transit, our government had made investments and achieved results. For instance, the average age of infrastructure in Canada is coming down for the first time in 30 years. This proves that we are investing in our infrastructure and in public transit.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat NDP Pontiac, QC

Madam Speaker, the situation in aboriginal communities under third party management by this government is not improving. Take for example the Barriere Lake reserve, which has been under third party management for far too long. The record is shameful: no new housing since the 1980s, no secondary school on the reserve and no investment in the primary school.

When will the government end third party management, which is not working, and when will this government allow the Algonquins of Barriere Lake to take care of themselves?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Vancouver Island North B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan ConservativeMinister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Madam Speaker, the situation at Barriere Lake, Lac-Barrière, is a very difficult one. I agree. It has been going on for years. We have invoked a rarely used section of the act in order to try to effect governance in that community. We will continue to do what we can in a very difficult set of circumstances and do the right thing for the people of that community.

Search and RescueOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Andrews Liberal Avalon, NL

Madam Speaker, the employees at the marine communications and traffic services centre know their jobs and the government should listen to them. However, our regional minister recently insulted them as he rubbed cake in their faces and then ran out the back door.

The Coast Guard continues to be gutted. First it was about closing the marine sub-centre. Now we find out that the government has given the order to cut key positions in marine communications and traffic services. The employees have confirmed these cuts and are very concerned that they will drastically affect their ability to keep mariners safe.

Let us be clear: these employees listen for the mayday calls. Why would the government compromise this important service?