This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #75 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was firearms.

Topics

(The House divided on Motion No. 5, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #115

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

February 7th, 2012 / 7 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare Motion No. 5 defeated.

The next question is on Motion No. 6.

(The House divided on Motion No. 6, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #116

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare Motion No. 6 lost.

The next question is on Motion No. 7.

(The House divided on the Motion No. 7, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #117

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare the Motion No. 7 lost.

The next question in on Motion No. 8.

(The House divided on Motion No. 8, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #118

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare Motion No. 8 defeated.

The next question is on Motion No. 9.

(The House divided on Motion No. 9, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #119

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare Motion No. 9 defeated.

The next question is on Motion No. 10.

(The House divided on Motion No. 10, which was negatived on the following division:)

Vote #120

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare the motion defeated.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

moved that the bill be concurred in.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The question is on the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

No.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

All those opposed will please say nay.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

In my opinion the yeas have it.

And five or more members having risen:

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Vote #121

Ending the Long-Gun Registry ActGovernment Orders

7:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I declare the motion carried.

I wish to inform the House that because of the delay there will be no private members' business hour today.

The order is therefore deferred to a future sitting.

A motion to adjourn the House under Standing Order 38 deemed to have been moved.

7:40 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Liberal Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, climate change is our most pressing environmental issue, perhaps the defining issue of our generation and will profoundly affect our economy, health, lifestyles and social well-being. It requires moral responsibility and intergenerational responsibility. How we respond will define the world our children and their descendants grow up in.

I spent the last 20 years of my life studying climate change, particularly the impact of climate change on human health. I had the privilege of serving as lead author on the intergovernmental panel on climate change for two reports and consulting to Environment Canada's climate adaptation impacts research group for many years.

It is for these reasons I spent four months building the first ever all party climate change caucus on Parliament Hill. During the Durban climate change conference, or COP17, I had the South African High Commissioner come and speak to the climate change caucus about the negotiations.

I was therefore extremely disappointed when the government refused to include opposition MPs in the delegation to Durban. For decades, Canadian delegations to international conferences have been understood to represent Canada, not just the governing party. The Conservative government broke this tradition in 2006 for COP12 in Nairobi. Opposition MPs were again included at COP14 at Poznan.

It was important to take part to reflect the voice of Canada, and not just quote, according to the Minister of the Environment, “a strong, stable, environmentally sensitive Conservative government”. I find the words “environmentally sensitive” extremely egregious, as that is the government that slashed the budget of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency by 43%, planned cuts to over 700 Environment Canada scientists, planned cuts to critical ozone monitoring and withdrew from Kyoto.

It is important that the Canadian delegation recognize that climate change is not just an environmental issue, it is also a human rights issue, the right to live. Climate change is also an international security issue and a justice issue; that is, the ones who are suffering most had the least responsibility for it.

We must listen to the leaders of small island states who remind us that climate change threatens their very existence. Recently the island nation of Kiribati became the first country to declare that climate change was rendering its territory uninhabitable and asked for help to evacuate its population.

In any struggle it is important to listen to the front lines. In the case of climate change, they are aboriginal peoples, those living in low-lying states and those living in the Canadian Arctic. If people are being meaningfully impacted by climate change, they should be meaningfully involved in negotiations. Governments must be accountable to those who are impacted. Tragically, Kiribati and the Maldives are the canaries in the coal mine. If the international community cannot save the front line first, it will not be able to save itself down the line.

In pulling out of Kyoto, the government abdicated responsibility to our global neighbours and to our children and grandchildren. The government appears to have no understanding of what is at stake for Canada or the world. Judging by its actions, it appears it has no appreciation that climate change is real, that it is happening now and that the chance of keeping the average warming to 2° Celsius associated with dangerous climate change is growing slim.

7:45 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, when answering the question put by the member in the House originally, I think it is important to note her party's track record with regard to climate change. I appreciate her background and her interest in the area. Because of that, I want to remind the member of the policy context at which I look.

First, when her party signed on to Kyoto, the agreement did not include all major emitters. In fact, it only included about 30% of emissions across the world. Therefore, this is not all major emitters. This is not a plan to see real reductions of global greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, when the Liberals signed on to it, they had no plan to implement it. They entered into an agreement that was not effective, with no plan to implement it. Then, under their tenure, greenhouse gas emissions rose substantively. In fact, it was about 27% to 33%.

In 2008 the Liberals came up with a plan, a carbon tax, a tax on everything, which would affect Canadian families and affect our economy in a major way. Then to re-emphasize the point of failure of their party in this issue, their former leader said that they did not get it done when it came to climate change.

Therefore, had the government validated or accredited the Liberal Party, we would not have been speaking as one voice as a country. Our country, our government believes that in order to see real action in global greenhouse gas reductions, we need to have a global agreement which includes all major emitters, not one that only includes 11% or 12%, one that includes major emitting countries right now.

We are proud of this approach and we look forward to continuing the good work that we started in Copenhagen, Cancun and now in Durban.