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House of Commons Hansard #186 of the 41st Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was research.

Topics

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie NDP Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, some constituents asked me if I would table this petition in the House of Commons, and I have to say that I am very impressed by the number of people who have signed it. It shows that people in Halifax really care about the rights of small-scale farmers to preserve and exchange and use seeds.

The petitioners are asking the government to adopt international aid policies that support small-scale farmers; to ensure that Canadian policies and programs are developed in consultation with small family farmers; and that they protect the rights of farmers in the global south to preserve, use, and freely exchange seeds.

The petitioners and I look forward to the minister's response.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Liberal Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is with pleasure that I stand today to table a petition signed by residents of Winnipeg North. In essence, the petitioners are asking that we adopt international aid policies that will support small family farmers, especially women, and recognize their vital role in the struggle against hunger and poverty.

The petition goes on to ask that Canadian policies and programs be developed in consultation with small family farmers and that they protect the rights of small family farmers in the global south to preserve, use freely, and exchange seeds.

ProstitutionPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Conservative Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, more than 200 petitioners are drawing Parliament's attention to the fact that a high percentage of prostitutes are forced into the sex trade and into trafficking in sex, that a big majority of them are women and children, and that there are those who profit from the sex trade.

These petitioners are concerned, and they are asking that we frame legislation so that it would be a criminal offence to purchase sex with a woman, a man, or a child, and that it would be a criminal offence for pimps, madams, and others to profit from the proceeds of the iniquitous sex trade.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Sadia Groguhé NDP Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition signed by a large number of people from Montreal's south shore. They are concerned about the threat that patenting seeds could pose to biodiversity and farmers' ability to freely use the seeds produced by their work.

The petitioners are therefore calling on the government to take action to support small-scale farmers and protect their rights to preserve, use and freely exchange their seeds.

Canada PostPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to present a petition signed by hundreds of residents and visitors to Prince Edward Island. The signatures are from all four federal ridings in Prince Edward Island. The petition includes signatures from Summerside, North Enmore, and right across the island.

These petitioners are concerned that the cuts to Canada Post are killing good jobs. The petitioners are also concerned about the elimination of door-to-door mail delivery, the closure of post offices, and the drastic increase in postage rates.

The petitioners are calling upon the government to reverse the cuts and to look at innovating instead of cutting.

The EnvironmentPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Conservative Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition signed by the students and teachers at Abraham Erb Public School in my riding of Waterloo.

The petitioners are underscoring the importance of clean water, clean air, and a clean environment in our country.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre NDP Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to present two petitions today.

The first was signed by members of Development and Peace in the parishes of Saint-Noël-Chabanel and Saint-François-de-Sales in eastern Laval. This petition, which was signed by several hundred people, is calling on the government to respect the rights of small family farmers to preserve, trade and use their seeds.

Invisible WorkPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre NDP Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition that I would like to present today was signed by many women from Laval, Montreal and the north shore.

They are calling on the government to reinstate the mandatory long form census for 2016 and include questions in it about invisible work. They are also asking for measures to promote fairness for people who do invisible work and to improve their economic security.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Conservative Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition on behalf of the residents of Regina and the surrounding area.

These petitioners would like to bring to the attention of the House that multinational seed companies are threatening the ability of family farmers to produce the amount of food required to feed their families and communities. The petitioners are calling upon the Government of Canada to adopt international aid policies that support small family farmers, particularly women, and recognize their vital role in the struggle against hunger and poverty.

The petitioners want the government to ensure that Canadian policies are developed in consultation with small family farmers.

DementiaPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle NDP Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to present several copies of one petition to support my bill on dementia, Bill C-356. I have petitions from Brant, British Columbia, Ottawa, Ottawa—Orléans, Kitchener—Waterloo, Port Moody, South Surrey—White Rock, and Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

Yesterday I held a press conference on my private member's bill that we are going to hear later today. One of the comments from the journalists was—

DementiaPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

DementiaPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Conservative Barry Devolin

Order. The member knows that he can present a petition and make a very brief comment specifically relevant to it, but he is not to debate the matter or to make a speech.

If the hon. member has another petition to present, he can proceed.

DementiaPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle NDP Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, as I was saying as part of this petition, the reporter said that the Conservatives would be pretty stupid not to—

DementiaPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Conservative Barry Devolin

Order. The member knows he is out of order.

Presenting petitions, the hon. member for Repentigny.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Forces et Démocratie

Jean-François Larose Forces et Démocratie Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition signed by almost 1,000 Canadians. The petition calls on the government to implement policies that support small family farmers and farm workers around the world so they can preserve their seeds.

The threat to biodiversity and the future of food posed by policies in the agri-food industry is growing. The ratification by several countries of the most recent version of the UPOV will make illegal the ancestral rights of small family farmers to preserve, use and exchange their seeds.

It is time for this government to become a world leader in maintaining biodiversity, which is indispensable to the future of food for our families, communities and regions.

AgriculturePetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition signed predominantly by my constituents in Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo. They are calling for the respect of the right of the small-scale family farmer to preserve, exchange, and use seeds. I think our recent legislation clearly articulates that we do that. The other thing of particular relevance is to look at international aid policies that support small family farmers, especially women, and recognize their vital role in the struggle against hunger and poverty.

Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 948, 953, 982, 989, 993, and 1005.

Question No. 948Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

With regard to Health Canada’s regulation of medical marijuana: (a) for the seven step application process for producers, (i) how many applications have been received, (ii) how many are at each stage, (iii) what is the average time required to complete each stage since the program began, (iv) how long have applications presently in process at each stage been at that stage on average, (v) how many staff process applications, (vi) of those staff, how many have degrees outside the health sciences, (vii) how many have formal education in finance, (viii) for how many applicants at each stage is the department aware of non-compliance with applicable federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal legislation, regulations and bylaws, (ix) are media reports about applicants reviewed, (x) what fees are charged to applicants, (xi) what are the costs of processing an application; (b) what is the production capacity of licensed vendors; (c) how many patients are registered to purchase medical marijuana; and (d) what is the total quantity of medical marijuana required for registered patients?

Question No. 948Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations, MMPR, allow for the licensing of qualified applicants, or “licensed producers”, responsible for the production and distribution of marijuana for Canadians who have been authorized by a physician. The regulations are comprehensive and include rigorous criteria to protect the public health, safety and security of Canadians, including preventing cannabis from being diverted to an illicit market or use. Applicants seeking to obtain a licence must meet all criteria stipulated in the regulations.

With regard to (a) (i) and (ii), Health Canada has put in a place a rigorous licensing program. The first two stages of the process include a detailed screening of the application, focused on verifying its completeness, an examination of the proposed site, the proposed security measures and a review of the qualifications of the quality assurance person. The key personnel are then subject to a security clearance stage, coordinated by the RCMP. This can involve a comprehensive analysis of police records, fieldwork and coordination with other law enforcement agencies to identify whether an applicant poses a risk to the integrity of the control of the production and distribution of cannabis. The application is then reviewed in detail to confirm appropriate good production practices, record keeping, and physical security plans and procedures. The department may then choose to provide a “Ready to Build” letter, should one be requested. Applicants are notified that this letter is not a guarantee that a licence will be issued. The department will conduct a pre-licence inspection. Once all the terms of the regulations have been satisfied, a licence will then be issued.

Since the introduction of the MMPR, Health Canada has received 1224 licensed producer applications. Most applications to date have been processed and decisions rendered. To date, 881 applications have been assessed and refused or withdrawn; 320 aplications are in process, including security clearance, review and/or pre-licensing inpection phases; and 23 licenses have been issued.

With regard to (iii) and (iv), all applications undergo a strict and rigorous review process. The quality and completeness of the application can significantly affect the length of the review period. The department may request additional information, as required, to support its review of an application. A licence is only issued once the department has solid evidence that the applicant is fully compliant with the MMPR and would not pose a risk to public health and safety. The duration of the review process is highly variable, and can take more than a year.

With regard to (v), (vi) and (vii), Health Canada has assigned 32 full-time equivalent employees to respond to the current activity levels for licensing and compliance and enforcement activities under the MMPR. The activities are conducted by a multi-disciplinary team including scientists, engineers, project managers and program administrators.

With regard to (viii), Health Canada is responsible for ensuring compliance with the MMPR. Applicants must ensure that they are compliant with all federal, provincial, municipal and environmental legislation, including zoning as well as building and fire codes. It is the responsibility of the municipality to conduct the relevant inspections for compliance with bylaws. Licensed producers are also required to communicate with local authorities whenever there is a change in the status of their licence.

With regard to (ix), Health Canada is aware of media reports about applicants. The department works closely with the RCMP and other organizations, and takes into consideration any information provided by them that is relevant to the review of an application. Licences are only issued once the department has a solid basis of evidence that demonstrates there is no risk to public health, safety and security.

With regard to (x) and (xi), there are no fees associated with applying to become a licensed producer. It is difficult to determine the cost of processing individual applications, however, the forecasted expenditures of licensing, compliance and enforcement activities under the MMPR for 2014-15 are estimated to be $3.7 million.

With regard to (b), (c) and (d), as of January 2015, there are 23 licensed producers under the terms of the MMPR that are producing and/or distributing marijuana for medical purposes in Canada, with over 15,500 clients registered. These licensed producers, with an overall approved production capacity of 25,000 kg per year, have sufficient supply to meet current demand in accordance with the quality control measures and appropriate safety standards of the MMPR.

Question No. 953Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

With respect to wireless spectrum auctions and spectrum license requirements, including but not limited to AWS-3 spectrum, 600 Mhz and 3 500 Mhz, broken down by each individual auction and license requirement: (a) does the government have provisions requiring the incorporation of technologies into the wireless networks that allow surveillance and interception capabilities built into their networks; and (b) does the government pay for the costs of these provisions?

Question No. 953Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

March 13th, 2015 / 12:15 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as of 1996, (a) the government introduced a lawful intercept condition of licence that requires the licensee to maintain interception capabilities so that information can be provided when required by a warrant.

(b) The government does not pay for the costs of these provisions.

Question No. 982Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

With regard to the administration of justice: what are the details of all appeal cases in any court of Canada, or of a province or territory, since January 1, 2008, in which Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, the Attorney General of Canada, any Minister of the Crown, or any government of Canada agency, office, or crown corporation, is or has been an intervener, or sought standing as an intervener, notably (i) the parties to the case, including other interveners, if applicable, (ii) the summary of the issue or issues in dispute, (iii) the name of the court and the court docket numbers associated with the case, (iv) the expenditures to date, as intervener, on each case, (v) the reason for which the intervener sought standing as an intervener, (vi) the date and reference number of the judgement, if a judgement has issued?

Question No. 982Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the information requested is not readily available and would require an extensive manual search of all records. It is therefore not feasible to produce a response within the time period allotted.

Question No. 989Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Liberal Ottawa South, ON

With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Prime Minister's Office since March 27, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?

Question No. 989Questions on the Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Oak Ridges—Markham Ontario

Conservative

Paul Calandra ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Privy Council Office identified no contracts under $10,000 granted by the Prime Minister's Office from March 27, 2014 to January 29, 2015.