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House of Commons Hansard #129 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was regard.

Topics

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper Conservative St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister incredibly said that he was at a disadvantage when it came to learning the facts about Wynn's law.

Do members know who was at a disadvantage? It was Constable Wynn. He was at a disadvantage when he was shot and killed by someone who should not have been on the streets and would not have been on the streets had Wynn's law been the law.

Now that the Prime Minister is in the loop, will he do the right thing and pass Wynn's law?

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Vancouver Granville B.C.

Liberal

Jody Wilson-Raybould LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, again, I am pleased to speak about the mandate that the Prime Minister has given me to comprehensively reform the criminal justice system to improve the efficiencies and effectiveness of the criminal justice system, including bail reform.

I acknowledge the hon. colleague across the way for his involvement and commitment to ensure we improve the effectiveness. This is exactly what we are doing, working with the provinces and territories, working with stakeholders, and working with the steering committee, which is focused specifically on assisting us with bringing forward substantive solutions. We will move forward in due course.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has clearly shown just how out of touch he is with the needs of indigenous youth. The priority of youth is not canoes, but rather adequate and equitable services.

My question is very simple: when will the government finally comply with the decision of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal and the unanimous motion of the House and immediately invest the required $155 million?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to fully reviewing child and family services for first nations. We have invested $635 million over five years to close the gap in funding. We are determined to work with first nations, the provinces, and the agencies to achieve real reform at all levels to ensure the well-being of children.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Georgina Jolibois NDP Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, the money is still not flowing.

My constituents are also concerned that the enhanced service delivery program will end in March. Hundreds of youth benefit from this program, which is giving them important job skills.

Let us face it. This is not what first nations youth want. According to Indian Affairs, an assessment of the program should have been completed last year. It is now 2017.

Will the minister commit to ongoing funding so that northern youth are employed?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows in listening to youth, it is hugely important that they want the skills to to be able to participate in the economy, but they also want the language and culture. They want to be back in touch with the land to be able to be proud indigenous people. We will work on both fronts to make sure that happens.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Bob Saroya Conservative Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is very simple. Has the Government of Canada received, in writing, from the American government that the U.S. travel ban of citizens from the affected seven countries will not affect Canadians with dual citizenship and permanent residency travelling to the U.S.?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, Canada continues to be a welcoming country to newcomers, including those refugees fleeing persecution and war.

U.S. authorities have assured us very clearly that anyone with a Canadian passport and Canadian permanent resident cardholders will be allowed entry into the United States. We continue to monitor the situation closely and work with our American counterparts.

Canada continues to remain open and views immigration as a key ingredient in our economic success.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, the private sponsor refugee program uses donations from Canadians to support refugees, which means that we do not need to rely solely on taxpayers to help those who are in need. The Prime Minister's weekend Tweet did absolutely nothing to explain his decision to prevent privately sponsored refugees from being admitted to Canada this year.

With over 45,000 PSR applications in the queue, why is the Prime Minister limiting the generosity of private sponsorship groups and shifting the responsibility solely to taxpayers?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I am glad the hon. member asked that question, because it gives me an opportunity to clarify some of the confusion around this.

The year of 2016 was unprecedented for our country. We welcomed more than 40,000 Syrian refugees, from November 4, 2015, and we are proud of that record.

Wait times for privately sponsored refugees continued to balloon under the previous government, and we intend to take action against that. Our immigration levels in 2017 create 16,000 allocations for privately sponsored refugees, which is triple that the previous government created under its administration.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, if the government is so welcoming to refugees, why, since the motion around Yazidi genocide victims was passed in October, has the government admitted exactly zero Yazidis to Canada?

My question is very simple. If the government truly supports this motion, why did the Prime Minister dodge this question? How many Yazidis is the government bringing to Canada and will it meet the timeline associated with the motion?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, our government has been recognized widely as being a great government for welcoming and resettling refugees from across the world. We are committed and proud of the fact that all members in the House supported the resettlement of victims and survivors of Daesh. We have a plan that is under way. Our operation is under way. We have committed to meet that goal. We will be providing an update to the House in the near future.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Don Rusnak Liberal Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour and I were pleased to reopen one of nine Veterans Affairs Canada offices closed by the previous Conservative government. The nearly 1,700 veterans in my region can now be served by Veterans Affairs staff, will now provide restored service and access, and benefits to veterans where they need them and when they need them. This is not just a gain for Thunder Bay but for all of northwestern Ontario.

Could the Minister of Veterans Affairs give the House an update on office reopenings?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

January 30th, 2017 / 2:55 p.m.

Calgary Centre Alberta

Liberal

Kent Hehr LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I am extremely proud to be reopening doors that were previously closed to veterans and their families. Veterans have selflessly served our country and our government is recognizing their service by enhancing financial benefits and restoring and expanding access to critical services not just in Thunder Bay, but in Corner Brook, Brandon, Sydney, Kelowna, Saskatoon, and Charlottetown, where we also opened offices. We will open three more offices in Windsor, Prince George, and Surrey, B.C., all by May of 2017. We are getting it done.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister stated that he knew better than the chiefs and the top priority for indigenous youth was a place to store their canoes and paddles. That is unbelievable. We have a suicide crisis. Two 12-year-olds from Saskatchewan took their lives.

Our committee travelled across the country with panels listening to youth. They talked about safety, security, education, and hope. Canoe storage did not come up.

Will the Prime Minister retract these condescending and out-of-touch comments?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Markham—Stouffville Ontario

Liberal

Jane Philpott LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, any loss of life is a great tragedy and it grieves us when we hear about indigenous young people taking their lives. We know that the roots of the suicide crisis among indigenous youth are deep and complex, but we are working with our partners, indigenous leaders, and provinces to make sure we have supports for people.

Our government has invested $69 million to make sure there will be 24 mental wellness teams, as well as crisis support teams.

We will continue to support these youth and put an end to this crisis.

EmploymentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton NDP Churchill—Keewatinook Aski, MB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are increasingly worried about their economic situation, and this is tied to the emerging crisis of precarious work that we are facing in our country. While the economy is staggering, the government is failing to protect and create good, full-time, permanent jobs. It has also failed to react to this crisis and, instead, prefers to tell Canadians to just get used to it. Canadians deserve a government that will fight for good jobs.

When will the government show leadership, stand up for Canadian workers, and fight for the good jobs that they deserve?

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Employment

Mr. Speaker, our government knows that our prosperity relies on young Canadians getting good jobs and contributing to the economy in the fullest way. That is why we are investing historic amounts into ensuring that young people have the diversity of skills to bring forward new ideas, new talent, and new creativity to the emerging workforces of Canada.

I look forward to working with the member opposite on a plan.

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Sahota Liberal Brampton North, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year small businesses and non-profits in my riding of Brampton North hired 134 students through the Canada summer jobs program. Could the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour tell the House how many jobs across Canada have been created for young Canadians this year?

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Employment

Mr. Speaker, we know it is important for young Canadians to have access to opportunities to gain the skills that they are going to carry forward into their careers. That is why I am so excited that we are again supporting small businesses, not for profits, and public sector employees to hire young Canadians this summer through the Canada student job program.

I encourage all employers to apply for funding at canada.ca. The deadline is Friday.

Official LanguagesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d’Orléans—Charlevoix, QC

Mr. Speaker, in January, there were two incidents where the Prime Minister should have answered a question in one language but instead he answered in the other.

With his usual arrogance, the Prime Minister demonstrated his lack of respect for Canadians and official languages. On behalf of Canada's linguistic minorities, I am calling on the Prime Minister to publicly apologize for his blatant lack of respect for those communities.

Will the Prime Minister apologize and finally show respect for Canada's official languages?

Official LanguagesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Ahuntsic-Cartierville Québec

Liberal

Mélanie Joly LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, it goes without saying that our Prime Minister is an ardent defender of official languages. That is why he gave me a strong mandate to support him on this issue.

Official languages are a priority for our government and we have done more than just talk. We have taken action. We reinstated the Mobilité francophone immigration program. We appointed bilingual judges to the Supreme Court, and we reinstated the court challenges program. Those are not just words. We have taken action.

We are also going to launch a new official languages action plan in 2017.

EthicsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Rhéal Fortin Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government wants to introduce a bill laying out the rules for its $1,500 fundraising cocktails featuring privileged access to the Prime Minister, but that will not solve the problem.

The government has no plans to end the undue influence of bagmen or privileged access for rich lobby groups that can afford to invest $1,500 in a Liberal cocktail.

The Liberal position is that advertising these fundraisers will suffice.

When will the Liberals realize that advertising $1,500 privileged access to the Prime Minister does not make it more ethical?

EthicsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Burlington Ontario

Liberal

Karina Gould LiberalMinister of Democratic Institutions

Mr. Speaker, Canadians need more openness and transparency when it comes to political party fundraising activities attended by ministers, party leaders, and party leadership candidates. We will introduce our plan to make that happen.

I am pleased to be working with parliamentarians to introduce more openness and accountability into political party fundraising activities.

Democratic ReformOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Bécancour—Nicolet—Saurel, QC

Mr. Speaker, a month ago the Prime Minister attended a cocktail party with Chinese investors who wanted to move their projects forward by paying $1,500.

This could continue today under Liberal legislation. Of course there will be a report, which will be made public with great pomp and circumstance, but otherwise, nothing will change.

Rather than encouraging cynicism among the electorate, will the Minister of Democratic Institutions follow Quebec's example, put a $500 cap on political donations, and restore per-vote public subsidies to political parties?