This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #146 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was energy.

Topics

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Conservative Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister defended his approval of the sale of Canadian seniors' care facilities to the Chinese, claiming that it would create jobs for Canadians. Today we learned that nothing could be further from the truth; there are absolutely no new jobs attached to this deal. Clearly, pleasing Chinese billionaires is more important than Canadian jobs and Canadian seniors. How can he justify selling Canadian medical facilities companies to his friends in Beijing with no guarantee of benefits to Canadians?

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, we engaged the British Columbia government and the minister of health to make sure that all of the regulations would be followed in that province.

However, more importantly, we believe that global investment is good for Canada, because when we bring investment to Canada, it creates opportunities for growth. When we grow the economy, we create good-quality jobs. What does “good-quality jobs” mean? They help strengthen the middle class. That is what this investment is all about, making sure that we maintain good jobs, and making sure that it has additional financial resources to expand its facilities and create more jobs. This is good for the economy, good for job creation, and good for the middle class.

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, beyond the very real concerns for the welfare of Canadian seniors living in these care facilities, the Liberals' indecent rush to embrace this sketchy deal has skated too quickly past security and investment due diligence. American government regulators and investment houses have absolutely refused to deal with this Chinese company on the basis of its murky ownership and shareholder structure. If the minister is so confident in this backroom deal, will he make public the analysis of the Canadian security agencies that reviewed the deal?

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite knows that this deal was under the provision of the Investment Canada Act. We did our due diligence, followed the process, and made sure that this was in the overall net economic benefit of all Canadians. Otherwise we would not have proceeded. As I have reiterated before, it is about global investment, creating jobs, and growing the economy. We made the best decision in our national interest and in the net economic benefit for British Columbians and all Canadians.

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Conservative Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has stated in this House that when it comes to trade deals, “we need more transparency on what is happening. We need not just great photo ops, but the details of what is going on”. Therefore, it seems a little strange then that only Chinese state-run media is reporting that Canadian officials have been in Beijing since last Monday for secret meetings on a bilateral trade agreement. Will the minister be open and transparent with Canadians and tell us if she is negotiating a free trade agreement with China, yes or no?

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country B.C.

Liberal

Pam Goldsmith-Jones LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we owe it to Canadian workers and their families to ensure that we have the access we need to the significant Asia-Pacific market. We will continue to explore ways to expand our commercial relations and our progressive trade agenda throughout the region in the most effective way possible. This will be the message of the Minister of International Trade at the upcoming high-level dialogue in China.

As well, and as the member opposite well knows, all of us in this House look forward to sharing the committee's recommendations on the future of our trade with the Asia region.

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Conservative Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the committee has not done any work on China, and it is all about consultations until it should.

The Liberals have turned the softwood lumber deal into a crisis. The Liberals are failing Canadian farmers on pulse exports to India; that deal is up in March. The Liberals rolled over on negotiations on NAFTA without really knowing what they are putting at risk. Now, the Liberals are engaged in secret negotiations with Chinese officials. It is more of the same.

Why do the Liberals not start cleaning up the messes they have already created before they launch new negotiations with China?

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country B.C.

Liberal

Pam Goldsmith-Jones LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, as the member opposite well knows, Canada is a trading nation. We understand the importance of strengthening Canada's role in the global economy and we are very concerned about the rising ways of protectionism we see around the world.

To turn to Japan, for instance, it is a long-standing and important partner for us, and that has not changed. The international trade report on TPP will help guide us as we expand commercial relations and our progressive trade agenda in the Asia region.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Jenny Kwan NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, the University of Toronto's international human rights program released a shocking report on Canada's practice of detaining children in medium-security immigration jails. According to the report, Canada detains almost 250 children annually. Some of these children are even held in solitary confinement, in breach of international law and the charter. This is a disgrace.

Will the government finally amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and prohibit the detention of children?

Public SafetyOral Questions

February 23rd, 2017 / 2:35 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, immigration detention is a measure of absolute last resort. That is why we are investing $138 million to both improve the system and minimize its use. We want to avoid the housing of minors in detention facilities as much as humanly possible.

I would note that the report the hon. member refers to said this:

CBSA has embarked on several new programs to improve transparency, alternatives to detention, and infrastructure.... the total number of children in detention across the country...has decreased significantly....

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Dubé NDP Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is the second anniversary of the first vote on Bill C-51. The Liberals and the Conservatives joined forces to pass a bill that violates our rights and freedoms.

History is repeating itself with Bill C-23, which is bad for human rights and Canadians' privacy.

The government has admitted that the current pre-clearance system works well, so why is it so determined to forge ahead with giving American officers more powers on Canadian soil?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the point is simply this. Under the pre-clearance system improved by the legislation in Bill C-23, more Canadians will be able to clear customs in Canada before they cross the border, under the full umbrella of Canadian law, the protection of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the protection of the Bill of Rights, and the protection of the Canadian Human Rights Act. That is obviously a far superior process.

FinanceOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, during one of my regular meetings with Canadian business people and economic stakeholders, I met with officials from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. These are entrepreneurs, job creators, and wealth creators from across the country, and they are all very worried about this government's lack of vision.

We know that the Liberal Party was elected on a promise to return to a balanced budget by 2019, but the Department of Finance has found that we will not return to a balanced budget until 2055. That is completely unacceptable, and the minister knows it.

Could the minister at least set the record straight for these entrepreneurs, job creators and wealth creators? When will Canada return—

FinanceOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. Minister of Finance.

FinanceOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, it is very important to create good economic conditions for business across the country, for small and medium-sized businesses as well as large corporations.

That is why we need to make investments in our future. Our goal is to spur economic growth and create more opportunities for workers, and at the same time, more opportunities for companies of all sizes. We will therefore continue our investment program to grow the economy.

FinanceOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, not even a hint of a response telling us when we are going to return to a balanced budget. When my colleague worked in the private sector, he would never have tolerated such a weak answer like that.

I will ask the question again on behalf of all Canadian business owners and all Canadian taxpayers: when will the government finally return to a balanced budget?

Will it be in 2019, like my colleague promised, or will it be in 2055, as the officials at the Department of Finance are sadly predicting?

FinanceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, our goal is clear: we want to have an economy that works for Canadians and companies across the country. That is very important.

It is very important to invest in infrastructure and to have innovative companies. There will be more growth in the future and more opportunities for individuals and companies.

TaxationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, on the carbon tax cover-up, this week 68-year-old Rick Russell put up a massive sign on his house declaring “another senior loses home due to high energy costs”. He has given up his truck and house so he can pay a tax that will fund rebates for millionaires who buy $150,000 electric cars. Now the government is hiding what the tax will cost the poor and middle class.

Will the Prime Minister end the carbon tax cover-up and tell Rick what the tax will cost him?

TaxationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, 80% of Canadians already live in a jurisdiction where there is a price on carbon pollution. That is thanks to the leadership of the provinces.

I was actually heartened to see that it was not just Liberal governments which had done that, or NDP governments. We also have Conservative parties. The Conservative Party of Manitoba has committed to putting a price on pollution. Patrick Brown, the leader of the Conservative Party in Ontario, has said that putting a price on carbon pollution just makes sense.

Why does it make sense? Because it fosters a cleaner future, it reduces emissions, it creates good jobs, and it is the right thing to do.

TaxationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order, please. I know hon. members want to assist the minister in how she might answer, but let us remember that one person asks the question, one person answers the question, and the rest of us need to listen.

Now we need to listen to the hon. member for Carleton.

TaxationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, still on the carbon tax cover-up, disabled grandmother Kathy Katula broke into tears at the Prime Minister's recent town hall, asking him how she would pay his new carbon tax on her home heating. The Prime Minister gave her a nice warm hug, but not warm enough to heat her home. Now he is censoring the cost of his tax on the poor and middle class.

Kathy is paying the bill. She should have the right to see the bill. Will the Prime Minister end the carbon tax cover-up and tell Kathy what his tax will cost her?

TaxationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted for this opportunity to talk about the importance of working for a cleaner environment, a cleaner economy, an economy that protects the health, the clean water, and the clean air of this generation and future generations; a government that also works for economic growth to benefit the middle class; and a development that also is inclusive of everyone who is vulnerable in our population. We are working very hard to achieve these three goals.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, 10 years ago, the AFN and Cindy Blackstock filed a human rights complaint against the federal government to end racial discrimination against first nations kids. Today, at committee, the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs told us that the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal was not the court of law, therefore implying that the government did not need to respect the tribunal.

All indigenous children have the right to a healthy childhood. Therefore, when will the government do the right thing and stop discriminating against first nations children?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, we welcome the tribunal's ruling and we are working very hard with concrete steps to address its orders. We have committed $635 million over five years to close the gaps in child and family services. We have invested an additional $382 million over three years to expand the definition of Jordan's principle. We are working with the provinces and territories, the service providers, as well as first nations, to totally overhaul the system.

Today we are very pleased that Grand Chief Ed John has agreed to chair the national advisory committee to ensure we get this done.

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Brigitte Sansoucy NDP Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, many cases have demonstrated that applying the criterion of naturally foreseeable death is not effective. There has been another tragic case in Quebec. We cannot stand by and wait for judicial rulings. The Special Joint Committee on Physician-Assisted Dying recommended the use of advance directives. Madam minister, action is urgently needed. We cannot let people suffer.

Will the minister insist that the study on advance directives be completed before December 2018?