This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #136 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was ceta.

Topics

EthicsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke North Ontario

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan LiberalMinister of Science

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to hear the opposition is finally taking an interest in science funding after a decade of neglect.

Our government believes in research, science, and scientists and the important work they do. That is why we have made the largest increase in the three federal granting councils in a decade. That is why we have reinstated the long-form census, unmuzzled our scientists, and launched the search for the chief science adviser. I look forward to building on these commitments.

EthicsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is nothing new here. All you have to do to be in the Liberal Party's good books is have enough cash for access or be a close personal friend of the Prime Minister. Where I come from, we call that special favours for special friends. We have a long list of them, and now we can add Canada 2020, as well as the former chief of staff and the defeated Liberal candidate that were appointed by the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

When will this government finally stop putting the interests of the Liberal Party before the interests of all Canadians?

EthicsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as Canadians know, we introduced a new government-wide appointment process that is open, transparent, and based on merit. This approach will help us find high quality candidates, while promoting gender equality and Canadian diversity. The new selection process reflects the fundamental role played in our democracy by the many Canadians that serve on commissions, boards, crown corporations, organizations, and tribunals all across the country.

EthicsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Chris Warkentin Conservative Grande Prairie—Mackenzie, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are not buying these lines from the other side.

Under the Liberal government, Canada 2020 has become an extension of the government. It has received tens of thousands of dollars of taxpayer funds from multiple ministers. Canada 2020 has even boasted about setting up offices in the parliamentary precinct.

Canadians are not buying this, and they are not buying that the Prime Minister should continue to be able to funnel taxpayers' money to his friends. When will the Prime Minister put a stop to this?

EthicsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke North Ontario

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan LiberalMinister of Science

Mr. Speaker, as I said, I am really happy to see the opposition finally showing some interest in science funding after a decade of neglect.

Our government believes in research, science, and scientists and the important work they do. We are proud to have made the largest investment in the three federal granting councils in a decade. We have also reinstated the long-form census, unmuzzled our scientists, and launched the search for Canada's chief science adviser. I look forward to building on those commitments.

Softwood LumberOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Karine Trudel NDP Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, mayors from Quebec came here to Ottawa to impress on the government the importance of the softwood lumber industry.

A new agreement between Canada and the United States needs to take into account forestry realities that are specific to Quebec. For years, paper mills, sawmills, and business owners have been held back by countless battles. Again, it is the workers who suffer the most.

Does the government have a plan B, such as loan guarantees, for protecting the industry?

Softwood LumberOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, the softwood lumber agreement expired under the previous government.

This government is championing the interests of Canadian workers and producers in the softwood lumber sector. We will continue to work closely with the workers and producers in the softwood lumber sector, the provinces, and the territories because we are looking for a good agreement for Canada and Quebec, not just any agreement.

Service CanadaOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Stetski NDP Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government promised to improve the lives of Canadian seniors, yet residents in my riding of Kootenay—Columbia are not receiving their old age security, because Service Canada is so under-resourced it cannot keep up. At this rate, Canadians turning 65 will not receive their old age security until they turn 67. This is unacceptable.

Will the government address and immediately fix the OAS backlog in order to stop neglecting our seniors?

Service CanadaOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, I am very grateful for the question, and I commend the interest of our colleague and his very important question. We want all our seniors not only to receive the benefits to which they are entitled, but also the quality of services to which they are entitled and expect from our government.

We announced in last year's budget significant investments in Service Canada. We are going to work on these investments and make sure that all of our seniors receive the respect and the benefits that they deserve.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, there used to be order in Canada's once-a-decade election to the UN Security Council. States in the western Europe and others group where Canada competes took turns with candidacy, but no more, and when governments take principled stands on a range of global issues, as our Conservative government did in 2010, less principled countries betray their commitments.

Now we know the Liberals have an unhealthy focus on gaining, or buying, enough votes to win, but just how much are the Liberals willing to compromise to get that seat?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the member would know that now more than ever, Canada needs to be heard around the world, and that a seat on the Security Council would be an important avenue for us to share and advance the goals that Canada has for the world. These are goals like inclusive and accountable governance, and respect for diversity and human rights, including the rule of law. This is the world which we are working towards, and a Security Council seat is an important avenue to get there.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Public Safety.

It looks like Chinese nationals are sneaking into our country in increasing numbers with fraudulent and tampered visas. We are hearing about the criminal elements and others posing a risk to Canada and entering the country under the radar. We know the Liberals are cozying up to Chinese billionaires and the Chinese government, and they are opening up these new visa application centres throughout China.

Can the minister explain where these tampered visas are coming from and what actions he is taking to stop this national security threat?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we take the credibility and integrity of Canadian travel documents with great seriousness. A well-functioning border is essential to Canada's security and to our prosperity.

Alerts and notices pertaining to fraudulent documents are regularly distributed to border services officers and Canada Border Services Agency personnel to ensure that every traveller arriving in Canada has the right to enter in a legal and properly documented fashion, and if the documentation is not correct, then the entry is refused. We want to ensure the integrity of our border.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Canada Border Services Agency issued an alert on February 2, which is not that long ago, on the significant increase in illegal Chinese immigrants trying to enter the country. When asked about this in the House, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness answered that it was important for border services officers to be made aware of this risk and danger. I believe that everyone agrees that all officers should be made aware of this risk and danger.

Can the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness tell us what measures he has implemented since February 2 to resolve this situation once and for all?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the CBSA officers who are on duty at the 120 border crossing points that provide entry into Canada are well trained. They are professionals in what they do. They protect Canada in a front-line way. They process, quite literally, hundreds of thousands of potential travellers every day. They handle $2.5 billion in trade going both ways across our border every day. Canadians can count on their professionalism.

HealthOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Anju Dhillon Liberal Dorval—Lachine—LaSalle, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is a national public health crisis in Canada. Yesterday, Alberta reported it had 343 deaths due to fentanyl overdoses last year, compared to 257 the previous year. This tragic crisis continues to make its way east. Seizures of fentanyl and carfentanil are on the rise across the country.

My hometown of Montreal has decided that supervised injection sites are an appropriate tool for dealing with the situation we are facing.

What is the government doing to address this national public health crisis?

HealthOral Questions

3 p.m.

Markham—Stouffville Ontario

Liberal

Jane Philpott LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Dorval—Lachine—LaSalle for her important question. She is right, we are facing a national public health crisis. We must continue to provide a global, collaborative, and humanitarian response that is evidence-based.

Supervised injection sites are an important harm reduction tool, and they are central to this approach. This week we approved three applications for sites in Montreal. We will continue our efforts to save lives.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Alupa Clarke Conservative Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Phoenix pay system fiasco has been going on for over a year now and things just keep getting worse. One day, public servants are being paid too much. The next, they are being paid too little. The worst part is that the Liberal government is going to lose hundreds of millions of hard-earned taxpayer' dollars.

I will be very clear. The Phoenix software is not to blame. The minister, who has demonstrated a lack of judgment, transparency, and accountability over the past year, is.

When will the minister take control of her department and stop hiding behind her officials?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bonavista—Burin—Trinity Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Judy Foote LiberalMinister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, we are working very hard to fix the Phoenix pay system.

The previous government would know that in 2015, there was $78 million paid out in overpayments, so while this is not an ongoing acceptable practice, we are working hard to resolve it under the Phoenix pay system. First, our priority is to make sure that employees who work get paid for the work performed. We are also making sure we have a system in place so people can make their payments back, in terms of overpayments, in a way that does not cause hardship for those employees.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Richard Cannings NDP South Okanagan—West Kootenay, BC

Mr. Speaker, a Yukon judge has slammed the federal government and issued a wake-up call to Canadian taxpayers. The site of the Mount Nansen mine is now a toxic mess, and the company responsible filed for bankruptcy in 2004.

Judge Veale of the Supreme Court of Yukon said the company is guilty of “raping and pillaging” the land. Now it is up to taxpayers to pick up the tab, which could run into the hundreds of millions of dollars. What is the government doing to offset the costs for this site and others so that polluters pay, not the taxpayer?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, contaminated sites are one of the largest parts of our department. We take this very seriously in making sure that sites like that are returned to the pristine environment that are deserved. We will work with all companies to make sure that they do their part. In this situation where the company is bankrupt, it is a very difficult situation that we take very seriously and are looking to repair.

AccessibilityOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Nick Whalen Liberal St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canadians with disabilities face challenges every day that prevent them from fully participating in society. Everyone deserves a level playing field. All of my colleagues who participated in the consultations for an accessible Canada know that we need to reduce barriers to accessibility so that everyone has equal access.

Can the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities tell the House about the measures that have been implemented to make Canada fairer and more accessible?

AccessibilityOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Delta B.C.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough LiberalMinister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my hon. colleague from St. John's East for his question.

Earlier this year, I announced the approval of 573 projects under the enabling accessibility fund. These projects will be carried out by community organizations from across the country that applied for funding.

The approved funding will improve accessibility in our communities. These 573 projects are important to help ensure that all Canadians, regardless of their abilities, feel welcome and able to fully participate in society.

National DefenceOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Conservative Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, in 2006, Warrant Officer Roger Perreault was injured in an lED blast in Afghanistan. He has had three back surgeries, two hip replacements, and other complications. Now in the process of being released from the military, the Liberals are denying him his critical injury benefit, saying that at age 46, it is just normal wear and tear.

When did the fake promises of supporting our injured soldiers from slipping through the cracks become the policy of the Prime Minister?

National DefenceOral Questions

February 8th, 2017 / 3:05 p.m.

Calgary Centre Alberta

Liberal

Kent Hehr LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our department is committed to getting our soldiers, sailors, and aviators the care they need when and where they need it. We go through a complex array of systems of care to get them mental health supports and physical supports, whether that is through our 11 OSI clinics, whether it is through our 4,000 mental health care professionals and the like, to go forward, to build a system that ensures they are able to build their lives.

With respect to this particular member's concern, we can go back and look at it as a department.