House of Commons Hansard #180 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was families.

Topics

Judicial AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper Conservative St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Mr. Speaker, in addition to the official languages commissioner, we now learn that the price of appointment as a superior court judge also involves generous donations to the Liberal Party, with two of the latest appointees being none other than generous Liberal Party donors.

For a Prime Minister who promised a new merit-based appointment process, is it just a coincidence that so many Liberal Party donors are being appointed, or is this just the latest example of a Liberal promise made and a Liberal promise broken?

Judicial AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Vancouver Granville B.C.

Liberal

Jody Wilson-Raybould LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I always appreciate the opportunity to stand up to talk about our new open and transparent judicial appointments process.

I have been fortunate enough to find 60 significantly meritorious candidates who reflect the diversity of Canada and appointment to the superior courts across the country. I look forward to continuing to make announcements about judicial appointments and am very pleased with how the bench across the country is shaping up.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals' election platform promised that they would appoint parliamentary watchdogs that were accountable only “to Parliament, not the government of the day.” This process is a complete sham. These watchdogs will not be accountable to Canadians. They will only serve Liberal partisan interests.

Now that a Liberal insider has been handpicked by the Prime Minister as the official languages commissioner, what Liberal Party donor can we expect to be cast in the new role of ethics commissioner?

When it comes to appointing officers of Parliament, will the Liberals just stop the charade and admit that only Liberals asked by Gerald Butts and Katie Telford need apply?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ahuntsic-Cartierville Québec

Liberal

Mélanie Joly LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, we believe in the importance of the office of the official languages commissioner, because we believe in the importance of promoting and preserving the official languages of this country.

We were committed to finding the best candidates after a thorough process that was open and merit-based. We had the chance to do multiple interviews and also to go through an important and thorough process. I had the chance also to consult with my critics, and ultimately, we all agreed that Madeleine Meilleur has the qualifications for this important position.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

It is clear, Mr. Speaker, that the Prime Minister's time away from hosting cash-for-access events has put the process back several months by not being able to accept resumés with cheques attached. However, he is back tonight in Vancouver with his new cash-for-access and who wants to be the ethics commissioner countrywide tour.

When the Prime Minister gets back to Ottawa from his tour, will he be handing resumés over to the government House leader, Gerald Butts, and Katie Telford stacked in the order of the highest cheques given to the Liberal Party?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, the way the new open, transparent, and merit-based appointment process works is that Canadians can apply. They do not have to be affiliated with anyone. They can choose to apply and they deserve to be considered. That is why it is an open, transparent, and merit-based process.

We are delivering on exactly what we committed to Canadians. Our aim is to identify high-quality candidates. We will achieve gender parity and truly reflect Canada's diversity. Under the new process, over 140 appointments have been made.

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Tracey Ramsey NDP Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, the United States has formally triggered the clock on renegotiation of NAFTA. With hundreds of thousands of jobs on the line, the Liberals still have not disclosed their priorities to Canadians. After the Liberals told Canadians not to worry, Donald Trump sought massive tariffs on Canadian lumber and launched verbal attacks on our energy and dairy sectors.

Canadians are seriously concerned about their jobs. When will the Liberals stop appeasing the U.S. president and stand up for Canadian jobs?

International TradeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the notice that was given by Ambassador Lighthizer today is a step that has long been anticipated. It is a routine part of the U.S. domestic process. NAFTA negotiations have not yet begun. The formal notification today means that those negotiations can begin no sooner than 90 days from today.

I was pleased to meet with Ambassador Lighthizer on Tuesday, less than 24 hours after his swearing in. It was his first meeting with a foreign official.

We are ready to stand up for the Canadian national interest and we will always do that.

International TradeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, the United States began the process of renegotiating NAFTA, and I agree that it came as no surprise. Ninety days, that is not far off. President Trump was clear about his intention to protect American jobs and industries. We need a government that will hold its own when defending our industries and our jobs.

How can Canadians have confidence in this government when it is not even prepared to disclose the priorities it will defend during the negotiations?

International TradeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I already said, today is a technical step in the U.S. domestic process that we have long anticipated. We recognize that trade agreements must keep pace with the changing economy. However, I want to underscore that we will always proudly and vigorously defend our national interests and Canadian values.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government has told the provinces that if they refuse to impose a carbon tax, the Liberals will impose it for them.

Today, a technical document showed that the federal carbon tax will cost at least 11¢ a litre for consumers at the pumps, and of course, thousands more for home heating, electricity, and groceries. Now the government claims that it is considering giving some of that money back to the people who will pay it. How will it be possible, though, for those people to know if they are actually getting their money's worth, when the government continues to hide the real cost to the average family of the federal carbon tax?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, unlike the party opposite, Canadians know that polluting is not free. We are seeing droughts, fires, and floods across the country and around the world, which has impacted on human health. That is why we are working with the provinces and territories to put a price on pollution. Four out of five Canadians already live in a jurisdiction where there is a price on pollution.

Let me be perfectly clear. In the case that a federal plan has to apply because the province has not acted, revenues will go back to the province.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order. I am having trouble hearing the answers. I am certainly having no trouble hearing the questions. I need to hear both.

The hon. member for Carleton.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, in its 26-page technical report on the federal carbon tax, the government has thought of every single way to wring every single dime out of taxpayers in the relevant jurisdictions. There is talk of registered fuel importers, registered fuel distributors, surplus credit, and special bringing-in rules. There is all of this detail, except one detail. How much will it cost for the average family to pay the damn tax?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order. I am going to ask the hon. member to withdraw the word which he knows is unparliamentary. Could he do so now, please.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

It is withdrawn, Mr. Speaker.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, four out of five Canadians already live in a jurisdiction where there is a price on pollution, through the leadership of the provinces and territories. We appreciate that. We are working with the provinces and territories because once again, unlike the party opposite, we know that polluting is not free. We know that climate change is real. We know that acting on climate change will not only ensure a more sustainable future for our kids and grandkids, but it will also produce innovation and create good jobs, because we are going to have the solutions of today and tomorrow.

TaxationOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is the Liberal Party's record since it came to power: 30,000 full-time jobs lost and a $30-billion deficit that keeps ballooning every day.

The Liberals' plan to go into debt on the backs of our children and grandchildren and to keep taxing Canadian families is simply not working.

The Liberal government insists on having a carbon tax that will put even more of our Canadian families into debt. When will Canadians finally get a break and a chance to breathe?

TaxationOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, I want Canadians to be able to breathe. That is why we have a Canadian plan for the climate and that is why we are putting a price on pollution. We are seeing the effects of climate change. They are real and we are working with the provinces and territories, including Quebec, which already has a price on carbon, because that is what we must do for our children and grandchildren. This will help grow a cleaner economy.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, global refineries in my riding may move their operations and jobs elsewhere. Two levels of carbon tax in Ontario will force these jobs to the U.S. but will not reduce their carbon footprint. This carbon tax has already killed plant expansions, causing them to be built in the U.S., and it will hurt small business.

Why does the environment minister want to kill more jobs in Ontario?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased that through the leadership of the Ontario government, there is a price on pollution in Ontario. In fact, there is a price on pollution in provinces across the country.

I was actually very pleased—

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The EnvironmentOral Questions

May 18th, 2017 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order, order. Most members in all parties are able to sit through question period and hear things they do not like without reacting, as difficult as it might be at any time, through a question or an answer. I would ask others who have difficulty with that to try to restrain themselves.

The hon. Minister of Environment has 20 seconds.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I do not understand why the party opposite is against innovation and good jobs. In fact, I just tried a minivan made in Windsor. It is the first electric hybrid minivan. It will reduce emissions. It will cost less money for consumers, and it is creating good jobs in Canada. That is the innovation we want. That is the future we want for our kids.