House of Commons Hansard #349 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was affairs.

Topics

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her question.

Our thoughts are with the workers, families and communities affected by these store closures. We are always concerned when we hear about job losses. This transaction was reviewed to ensure that it provides an overall economic benefit to Canada. We will continue to work with the employees.

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse NDP Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, Lowe's has announced that it will be closing 31 stores across Canada, firing thousands of workers. The government was warned that this foreign takeover would reduce competition and close stores. The pattern was clear. Best Buy took over Future Shop. Workers were fired. Target took over Zellers. Workers were fired. Lowe's came after Rona. Workers were fired. Who green-lighted all this? It was the minister. Instead of plywood on shelves, now it is being used to be placed on the windows and doors of the stores.

Could the minister explain why in the U.S., no one will lose a job from Lowe's closures, whereas the deal he cut for Canada has thousands of workers fired? Why is he the only one left with a job?

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, again, I understand the concern raised by the member opposite. Of course, our hearts go out to the workers, their families, and the communities impacted by these store closures. We are always concerned and always remain concerned when we hear about job losses.

The member is correct. Under the Investment Canada Act, we actually did a thorough investigation and looked into the matter. We consulted the Quebec government as well. We were able to secure the headquarters in Boucherville and all the associated senior management positions, and we will continue to monitor the situation on an ongoing basis.

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Richard Martel Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, CPC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals always try to cover up embarrassing situations. Maybe that is why the government buried the judge in 135,000 documents. People concerned about Vice-Admiral Norman's defence are still skeptical about whether the government genuinely intends to co-operate.

My question is simple. Will the government commit to turning over all the necessary documents if the judge orders it to do so?

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, there is obviously an outstanding legal proceeding before the courts right now. The matter of the disclosure of documents is a matter the judge is seized of in that case. The various parties to the court proceeding will make their legal arguments, and the judge will decide with respect to issues such as privilege and confidence. It is in the hands of the courts, and that is where it should be determined.

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government, for over a month, was pleading with us to stop asking questions about the Mark Norman trial. Then suddenly, on Friday, something amazing happened. It finally turned the confidential documents over to the court. I guess better is possible.

Will the government confirm today that it will waive all cabinet confidences over documents the judge deems relevant so that Admiral Mark Norman can receive a fair trial?

JusticeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we have been saying for over a month that both sides in this legal proceeding, the prosecution and the defence, have competent, independent counsel. In the case of the prosecution, it is the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. The defence obviously has very capable counsel. They will take the proceedings that they believe are relevant. The matter is in the hands of the judge in the case, and the judge will decide. That is how our court system works.

JusticeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, now that the government has been forced to hand over the documents in the Admiral Norman legal matter, the questions on several conflicts of interest surrounding Liberal ministers and members of Parliament remain. To be transparent, will the government release all 73 names that its own investigation revealed were aware of cabinet secrets regarding the Davie shipbuilding decision?

JusticeOral Questions

November 5th, 2018 / 2:55 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as we have said from the very outset in this matter, this case is before the courts. We have an independent judicial system. It is up to representatives for the Crown and representatives for the defence to make their respective arguments in court, and the courts will determine the right way to proceed going forward. I would hazard a guess that the courts in this country do not need the assistance of the official opposition.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Randy Boissonnault Liberal Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, under the Conservative government, nothing was done to support our artists or modernize our laws on culture. After this decade of indifference for our artists and creators, our government is taking action. Last week, our government announced reforms aimed at modernizing the Copyright Act.

Thanks to changes to the Copyright Board of Canada, creators will now be paid for their work faster.

Would the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism explain what the modernized system means for our artists and creators?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pablo Rodriguez Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, the Copyright Board plays an important role. It allows artists and creators to be fairly compensated for their work, but it took years to approve royalties and render decisions. Why? It was because the Conservatives did nothing to modernize the board. Therefore, we took action.

These proposals will simplify and modernize the process and shorten wait times.

We will keep working with our creators to ensure they get paid more fairly and quickly.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Garnett Genuis Conservative Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, AB

Mr. Speaker, Asia Bibi spent eight years in solitary confinement in Pakistan in the world's most high-profile blasphemy case. We are excited about her acquittal, but she and her family remain in grave danger. Ministerial permits have been used in the past to help vulnerable victims of false blasphemy charges in Pakistan, such as in the case of Rimsha Masih, under the previous government.

Will the minister continue this proud Canadian tradition and offer asylum to Asia Bibi and her family?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, the right of freedom of religion or belief must and shall be protected.

We are very relieved that the Supreme Court of Pakistan has cleared Asia Bibi of charges of blasphemy. We urge the Government of Pakistan to take all necessary steps to ensure the safety of Asia Bibi and her family. We continue to urge the government and the people of Pakistan to reform the application of the blasphemy laws to prevent the targeting of religious minorities.

Human RightsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison NDP Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, BC

Mr. Speaker, Tanzania has announced a government task force, which tomorrow will begin hunting down and arresting people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex, with penalties ranging from 30 years to life imprisonment. The public has been asked to report gay people using a government snitch line. Hundreds have already been forced into hiding.

Amnesty International and others have condemned this hate campaign, and even the United States has issued a travel warning for Americans in Tanzania. Canada has done nothing. Will the government speak out against this incitement to hatred, persecution and violence?

Human RightsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Kamal Khera Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, our government believes the human rights of all persons to be universal and indivisible, and these include the human rights of LGBTQ2 persons. We will continue to champion respect for diversity and human rights, including the rights of LGBTQ2 persons, with fellow members of the international community, including Tanzania.

We will continue to work with countries to ensure that the rights of all individuals are respected and protected.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Rémi Massé Liberal Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, QC

Mr. Speaker, our government provides the navy and the Coast Guard with the ships they need to serve Canadians, while creating good jobs for the middle class and generating significant economic benefits for Quebec and the entire country.

As part of the national shipbuilding strategy, we have already allocated over $1 billion in contracts to Quebec companies, supporting hundreds of workers and their local economies.

Could the Minister of Public Services and Procurement tell the House about the most recent results our government has achieved for Quebeckers and Canadians under the national shipbuilding strategy?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

3 p.m.

Carla Qualtrough Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his question.

We awarded 17% of the national shipbuilding strategy contracts to Quebec companies. Last summer, we awarded a $610-million contract to Davie for three icebreakers. Last week, we awarded part of a $7-billion contract to Davie to maintain 12 Halifax-class frigates. We continue to create good jobs for Quebec.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Garnett Genuis Conservative Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would have a lot to say about the government's approach to religious freedom and human rights, but my question was about the issue of asylum for Asia Bibi and her family.

Time is of the essence. The family has specifically asked the Prime Minister of Canada to intervene. Shahbaz Bhatti and Salman Taseer were killed because of their advocacy on this case. Over 150 violent demonstrators have been arrested over the last few days, most of whom were specifically calling for Asia to be killed. So again, my question for the Minister of Immigration: Will the government offer asylum to Asia Bibi and her family?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, with like-minded friends and allies, there are discreet and delicate discussions under way, and I will not say anything further at this time.

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Xavier Barsalou-Duval Bloc Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, when Rona fell into the hands of the American giant Lowe's, the government had the power to put some conditions on the transaction, such as maintaining jobs and keeping stores open. We asked the government to do just that, but it did nothing. What happened? Today we learned that nine Rona stores in Quebec will be shutting down.

How will the 40 Liberal members, who did not lift a finger to protect workers, be able to look their constituents in the eye when they go back to their ridings?

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, our thoughts are with the workers, their families and the communities impacted by these store closures. We are always concerned any time we hear about job losses.

That transaction was scrutinized to ensure that it would present an overall net economic benefit to Canada. Consultations were also held with the Province of Quebec. Lowe's has made some commitments that must be fulfilled, and we will ensure that it does.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Pauzé Bloc Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec TV series are adapted all around the world. Our filmmakers can be found on the Promenande de la Croisette, in Cannes, and on Hollywood Boulevard for the Oscars, but do not look for them on Netflix. After a $500-million deal was reached more than a year ago, not a single penny has gone to original French-language productions. Netflix has contributed absolutely nothing to our culture.

When will the government compel these web giants to contribute by requiring them to collect sales tax that can then be invested in our culture?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3 p.m.

Pablo Rodriguez Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, our government is here for our artists and creators. We have invested $3.2 billion in culture, some of which has gone to CBC/Radio-Canada and the Canada Media Fund. We are also working to modernize laws that predate the Internet. We want modern laws to address today's problems, and we have set up a committee to look into the matter.

We will be passing legislation based on a number of principles, including a very simple principle that I have repeated many times in this House. Those who participate in the system must contribute to it. There will be no free passes.

HousingOral Questions

3 p.m.

Independent

Hunter Tootoo Independent Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker,

[Member spoke in Inuktitut]

My question is for the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development. This is in follow-up to my question last week. I do not believe that the minister grasped the severity of Nunavut's housing shortage.

Yes, $240 million has been allocated. It sounds like a lot, but it is over 10 years. That is 48 new houses per year for the entire territory, which is less than two per community. This is a crisis. Overcrowding is contributing to high rates of youth suicide and tuberculosis. No Canadian should live like this.

I ask again, will the minister take immediate action to work with the Government of Nunavut to solve this crisis?

HousingOral Questions

3 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased but sad to address this question. Indeed, we are in a crisis in many parts of Canada. That is because the federal government failed for many years to acknowledge its responsibilities to look after the housing needs of many communities across Canada, failed to address the particular housing needs and conditions in northern Canada, and failed to work appropriately and respectfully with indigenous peoples, including the Inuit.

I am glad to say that this is changing and will keep changing over the next 10 years through the first ever national housing strategy.