House of Commons Hansard #363 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was north.

Topics

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Drouin Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to be here today to show my support for Bill C-88, while acknowledging that we are gathering on the unceded traditional territory of the Algonquin people.

Our government is taking a new approach. We are currently conducting extensive consultations with indigenous governments and organizations as well as other key stakeholders on issues that will affect them. This process has helped create a law from which all Canadians can benefit.

Bill C-88 amends the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act in direct response to concerns expressed by indigenous groups affected by the previous piece of legislation as well as comments from key stakeholders.

Our indigenous partners have made their opinions quite clear. The Tlicho government and Sahtu Secretariat Incorporated applied to the courts in 2014 and 2015 respectively to defend their rights in accordance with their individual land claim and self-government agreements.

The bill we are debating today corrects the problems caused by the Conservatives and responds directly to the concerns expressed by indigenous governments and organizations. As part of the ongoing reconciliation process, the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations asked departmental officials to initiate an ongoing dialogue with indigenous organizations and governments in the Northwest Territories to address their concerns.

On September 23, 2016, the minister sent letters to indigenous groups and stakeholders launching consultations on the draft bill to amend the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act in order to address these issues.

Bill C-88 is the result of consultations with indigenous organizations and governments in the Mackenzie Valley, transboundary organizations and governments, resource co-management boards and oil and gas industry organizations.

In addition to indigenous organizations and governments, Canada consulted the Government of the Northwest Territories. Our government also consulted members of the mining and gas and oil industries, including the NWT & Nunavut Chamber of Mines, the Mining Association of Canada, the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

Ongoing consultations over the long term with key stakeholders have provided Canada with invaluable insight into the practical nature of the bill before us today. The comments from our partners provided unique perspectives and useful guidance which, in the end, led to the drafting of this bill. That is why proper consultation is important.

Canada recognizes that the Conservatives' legislation was drafted without enough consultation. That is why the Government of Canada ensured that the voices of indigenous groups, the government of the Northwest Territories, and industry representatives were heard at every stage of the process—from initial discussions through to drafting and review. Bringing together stakeholders is the key to developing effective policies and practices. The Government of Canada is holding extensive consultations in order to create processes that satisfy the needs of all parties. That ensures that the final product serves everyone in a positive and productive manner and gets rid of any possible uncertainty regarding natural resources.

In March, the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations met with industry groups to better understand their opinion on developing and co-managing resources in the North. Industry plays a major role in creating a stronger and better relationship with governments and indigenous organizations when it comes to protecting, managing and developing Canada's natural resources.

In order to truly make progress on the path to reconciliation with indigenous peoples, industry must be taken into consideration as a key strategic partner alongside all levels of government. By bringing together all the stakeholders, every concern will be addressed as it is raised.

If passed, the amendments this bill makes will contribute to the more efficient, predictable and consistent use and management of land, water and natural resources in the Mackenzie Valley. With the creation of a clearer path for governments and organizations in terms of natural resource management, industry will no longer face the potential uncertainty that hinders its ability to invest in northern Canada.

This law will enhance economic opportunities and growth while protecting the environment for future generations. It addresses concerns expressed by indigenous organizations and governments and respects the framework flowing from their constitutionally protected land claim and self-government agreements. It recognizes the importance of having indigenous peoples actively participate in the co-management of natural resources and of protecting their right to monitor the future of their territory.

The environment, the economy and reconciliation go hand in hand. We need to create a more effective system for everyone, and that is exactly what Bill C-88 accomplishes. I encourage my hon. colleagues to support it.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, at the end of his speech, he said the Liberals would be creating a more efficient system. The reason Bill C-15 amalgamated the boards was based out the McCrank report, which had indicated some significant issues in efficiency, capacity and ability to do things. Therefore, basically the Liberals are reversing things.

The Liberals intend to go back to the original system. What have they done to respond to the issues in the McCrank report outline some serious efficiency problems? On the face of it, what they are doing is moving from what was proposed to be a much more robust system to something more inefficient.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Drouin Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is important to recognize that we need to consult with indigenous peoples. Whether the government passes laws that would be kiboshed by the courts is at issue here. To get on the pathway to reconciliation, it is important for our government to consult with indigenous peoples. As well, yes, we need to consult with industry. This process would ensure that.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Conservative Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, I was really encouraged when the member made some important comments. He said that for this, industry was extremely important and that it needed clarity. His colleague from the Northwest Territories also said that. Therefore, my question for him is the same one I wanted to ask his colleague.

When companies make these once-in-a-generation investments, whether it is an automotive plant or resource development, they need certainty. The Liberals brought in a new policy, their carbon tax, and have only let Canadians know what the price will be until 2022, which is $50 per tonne. However, the United Nations report, which the environment minister has said she is following, states that it could be up to $5,500 per tonne. The member will know that there is a huge gap between $5,500 a tonne and $50 a tonne. When planning for these huge investments with new regulations, if companies do not have that certainty, they cannot make the investments.

What will be the Liberals' price on carbon be in 2030 so these companies, which need to invest now in these once-in-a-generation developments, can go forward with confidence knowing what their costs will be?

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Drouin Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I will not be able to tell him what the price on carbon will be by 2020 because I am not sure if we will still be here. However, under Stephen Harper, the price was going to be $60 a tonne in 2018. I am wondering if the Conservatives are finally going to get on board with providing the industry with predictability? We have told it that it will be $10 per tonne in 2018, $20 per tonne in 2019, $30 per tonne in 2020 and $50 per tonne by 2022.

Does he accept the same position as Stephen Harper, who declared in 2008 that in a decade it would be $60 per tonne? Therefore, today in 2018, it would have been at $60 per tonne.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Celina Caesar-Chavannes Liberal Whitby, ON

Mr. Speaker, this bill will look to fix some of the problems created by the previous government.

As our government moves to ensure we move forward on the path of true Truth and Reconciliation, I wonder if my hon. colleague has any additional comments on how the bill would ensure recognize the importance of indigenous rights and move toward reconciliation.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Drouin Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, we have seen in the past where governments have passed laws. Fortunately, the courts have kiboshed the decisions, because the laws did not respect our Constitution and indigenous peoples.

This bill is a good step forward in reconciling with indigenous peoples, providing clarity to the industry and to them. It is a good step forward to reconciliation.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

December 3rd, 2018 / 1:50 p.m.

Conservative

Garnett Genuis Conservative Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure for me to rise to begin my remarks on Bill C-88.

I will be sharing my time with my colleague for Yellowhead.

Bill C-88 speaks to the general context in which we think about oil and gas development in Canada. It speaks to the framework that the government has put in place that allows or does not allow important projects to go forward. I will speak in more general terms about some of those issues during the five minutes I have before question period. After question period, I will continue and speak more specifically about some of the issues that are dealt with directly in Bill C-88.

I am pleased to represent an oil and gas riding. We have something called the “industrial heartland”. We benefit, in particular, from the downstream refining and upgrading component to the energy sector. However, we have many people from our riding who are involved in the direct extraction of our energy resources as well.

Sometimes we hear points made in the House that somehow we should choose between the issue of getting pipelines developed or getting value-added processing done in Canada. People in my community, which is a hub of value-added processing, are very supportive of pipeline development as well. It is not an either/or. In fact, we can do both at the same time. Indeed, we need infrastructure to get our resources to market. At the same time, we are very supportive of policy proposals that facilitate greater energy-related manufacturing and otherwise taking place within Canada.

Under the previous government, we saw four pipelines get built and a number of other projects were in process at the time when there was a change in government. What was the current government's approach when it came to developing vital energy resources? First, it directly killed the northern gateway pipeline project and passed a tanker exclusion bill that sought to make the export of our energy resources from northern B.C. impossible. Even if there were to be a new project proposed that went through all the consultation requirements, that still would be unable to succeed because of Bill C-48.

The government piled all sorts of new conditions on the energy east pipeline project, which led to a decision not to proceed with it. However, let us be very clear. It was the Liberal government changing the rules in the middle of a process, adding additional conditions, that prevented that from going forward. Of course, we have seen its failure thus far with respect to the Trans Mountain pipeline as well. This is really having a chilling effect on development.

I look forward to continuing my remarks after question period.

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan will have seven minutes remaining in his speech following question period.

Brampton WestStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Kamal Khera Liberal Brampton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, my riding of Brampton West is home to many small businesses. These businesses provide jobs to help people from all walks of life and are the backbone of our economy.

A few weeks ago, I was proud to welcome the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion to my riding to meet with small business owners and talk about how our government is supporting them.

We had the opportunity visit Gem's House of Jerk, a Caribbean inspired restaurant with four locations around Brampton serving the community for 27 years. There we met the owner, Lloyd McDowell, better known in the community as Gem, who started the business at the age of just 19. We heard about the business's success and discussed our government's priorities over a plate of delicious jerk chicken.

With lower taxes for small businesses and investments in middle-class Canadians made by our government, I know Gem's House of Jerk will be around for years to come, serving up thousands of plates of delicious Caribbean delights.

Gerry BensonStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Conservative Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, last month, my riding of Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry said goodbye to Gerry Benson, a figure who has contributed much to our community over the years. Gerry was a very successful business person employing over 1,000 individuals, but Gerry was also a very generous man. His passion for giving back to his community was well known.

His charity golf tournament has raised over half a million dollars that was donated to local charities. Gerry also had a passion for education and making sure that those living in Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry had access to world-class educational opportunities. His legacy will live on through the St. Lawrence College automotive training facility, the university credit transfer agreements he helped to broker, and the creation of the Cornwall Innovation Centre.

He will be deeply missed by his community but more importantly by his wife Claudette; his children Marty, James, Kelly and Joy; and his six grandchildren.

I thank Gerry, for everything he has contributed to our community over the years. He will be greatly missed.

Calgary CentreStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Kent Hehr Liberal Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week, I announced a $21-million investment in 16 Alberta businesses, with 11 in Calgary alone. The money will help them scale up, create jobs, and get their products to market faster both at home and abroad.

The Calgary companies receiving support are: Aimsio, ATTAbotics, Enersoft, FLYHT Aerospace Solutions, Kent Imaging, Nanalysis, PK Sound, QuirkLogic, Recover Energy Services, Userful Corporation and Veerum. These investments are coming through our western innovation initiative fund, a program that proves our commitment to ensuring that Alberta businesses can achieve even greater success.

It is just another example of how our federal Liberal government is investing in creating jobs and diversifying our economy.

Urban Native Youth AssociationStatements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Jenny Kwan NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am very excited to share in the House the excellent work that Urban Native Youth Association is doing in my riding of Vancouver East.

Formed in 1988, UNYA serves as one of four Vancouver youth hubs. It is also partnered with over 265 community organizations. It is widely recognized for its excellent programming, strong youth engagement, fiscal responsibility and financial stability. UNYA is forging ahead in its plan to develop native youth centre at the corner of Hastings and Commercial streets.

The 48,000 square foot space will eventually host 14 of UNYA's 20 programs and house a suite of facilities including a library, computer lab, gym, social enterprise café, spiritual space, arts and cultural rooms, community kitchen and more. Adjacent to the site is the complementary and critical housing component.

Realizing this dream will require collaboration and support from all levels of government. In particular, federal infrastructure funding is needed. I call on the federal government to commit to investing in this project.

Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’atStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro Liberal Humber River—Black Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in the House today in my role as the chair of the Parliamentary Friends of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at. The work of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at in Canada has always had a peaceful message of love for all and hatred for none.

This initiative is part of an ongoing effort undertaken to showcase the peaceful nature and beauty of their faith while continuing to call on global powers to advance an agenda of peace, religious freedom, and the advancement of human rights in Canada and around the world.

I encourage all members of Parliament to join me tonight at the third speaker series event to learn more. I am very fortunate to have many Ahmadiyya community members in my riding of Humber River—Black Creek and I am blessed to enjoy a wonderful friendship with them all.

JusticeStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper Conservative St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Mr. Speaker, many jurors suffer from mental health issues arising from their jury service, and yet they are prevented from getting the full mental health support they require because of the jury secrecy rule, which prohibits jurors from disclosing their experiences during the jury deliberation process for life, even to a mental health professional. My private member's bill, Bill C-417, would change that. Consistent with the unanimous recommendation of a justice committee, it would carve out a narrow exception to the rule so that jurors could disclose their experiences to a mental health professional, post-trial, in a totally confidential setting. It would protect the integrity of the jury secrecy rule, while allowing jurors to get the help that they need.

I urge the speedy passage of Bill C-417.

Eco2FESTStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

David Lametti Liberal LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, QC

Mr. Speaker, the third edition of Eco2FEST wrapped up on November 23. This year was the first time the event had been held in Verdun. Eco2FEST is a festival that brings together different disciplines and sectors to explore new approaches to the economy and design.

Over the course of three weeks, the éco2FEST team brought together people from all over Montreal, with many directly from Verdun, to discuss important topics such as the future of the collaborative economy, public policies, housing and urban agriculture.

I had the pleasure of contributing to the program by participating in the round table on the theme of public policy and its role in supporting responsible progress.

Following the festival, the team has set up a co-working space, an exchange space and a fab lab makerspace in the heart of Verdun, in the basement of the Notre-Dame-des-Sept-Douleurs Church, creating a new public space for citizens of all ages to meet and discover new technologies.

I invite members to come and visit Verdun.

Laurentian Association for the Hearing ImpairedStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ramez Ayoub Liberal Thérèse-De Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, people around the world are celebrating the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, which aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

This year's theme focuses on empowering persons with disabilities for an inclusive, equitable and sustainable development. To that end, I would like to pay tribute to the Association des personnes avec problèmes auditifs des Laurentides, or APPAL, which has been working for 30 years to improve the quality of life of hearing-impaired people in the Laurentian region.

I would like to take this opportunity to salute the volunteers of APPAL. I especially want to thank Marylyn Laurier, the executive director, for her tireless dedication to helping hearing-impaired people in our region.

ImmigrationStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Conservative Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, QC

Mr. Speaker, do you know how much the Prime Minister's ill-advised #WelcomeToCanada tweet has cost Canadian taxpayers? According to the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, it has cost us $1.1 billion.

That billion dollars should have been used to shorten wait times for companies, like those in Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, hoping to legally bring in the foreign workers they so desperately need. Instead, wait times are exploding for those who follow the rules. Under the Liberals, the wait time has grown from 3 weeks to 24 weeks. That means nearly six months to confirm the obvious: the jobs are there, but there are not enough people to fill them. With unemployment at 2.4% in Chaudière-Appalaches, that is no surprise.

It is simple. Instead of spending tons of money on illegal migration, when will the Liberals stop penalizing companies by making them wait forever for following the rules?

World AIDS DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gagan Sikand Liberal Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, I met with the Peel HIV/AIDS Network to discuss how we can do more. Together, we recognize World Aids Day on December 1.

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is one of the world's most serious public health challenges. Since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, more than 70 million people have been affected. Today, there are approximately 36.7 million people living with HIV/AIDS around the world. World AIDS Day is a day of remembrance and rededication. It is a day for remembering those who lost their lives and loved ones. It is a day to be grateful for those who continue to provide care, employment and hope for those with HIV/AIDS.

HanukkahStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anthony Housefather Liberal Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, Sunday night was the first night of Hanukkah. This festival of lights commemorates the victory of the Maccabees and the subsequent miracle of rededicating the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and restoring its menorah.

For eight days, Jews around the world will celebrate by lighting a hanukkiah, feasting and playing games with family and friends.

However, despite the joy of this festive season, we still remember those massacred in Pittsburgh last month and take note of the rising rates of anti-Semitism in Canada and across the world. Intolerance today is by no means confined to anti-Semitism.

I call on all members of this House to work together on a plan of action to combat hate, including online hate. Canadian Jews seeing their leaders taking concrete measures to combat bigotry would be the best Hanukkah present of all.

LethbridgeStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, at the G20 summit, the Prime Minister talked about the so-called social impacts that male construction workers have on rural areas. He suggested that hard-working blue-collar men are dangerous and a threat to the well-being of our communities.

I have a lot of these men in my riding. Therefore, I would like to talk about the impacts they have. They leave tips at our restaurants, at barber shops and with our drivers. They fill up their trucks at gas stations. They buy coffee from local Tim Hortons. They sleep in our hotels. They take care of their families. They pay their taxes. They build the roads, bridges, schools and hospitals that we use each and every day.

If the Prime Minister wants to talk about men who have a negative impact on rural communities, he should look no further than the person in the mirror. My riding and indeed all of Canada would benefit greatly if he addressed the problem staring back at him.

International Day of Persons with DisabilitiesStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kate Young Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities. This year's theme, “Empowering persons with disabilities and ensuring inclusiveness and equality”, is at the heart of the Government of Canada's commitment to build a Canada without barriers.

In June, our government introduced Bill C-81, the accessible Canada act, which if passed will address barriers to accessibility in the federal jurisdiction.

Earlier today, the Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility announced that Canada has acceded to the optional protocol to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This means that Canadians will have additional recourse if they believe their rights under the convention have been violated.

These actions speak to our dedication to creating a truly inclusive and accessible Canada. Please join me in celebrating people with disabilities and the significant contributions they make to Canadian society.

International TradeStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Cheryl Hardcastle NDP Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, when the Liberals began renegotiating NAFTA in 2017, they promised to defend dairy, poultry and egg farmers, to bring in progressive measures like gender rights, labour rights, an indigenous chapter and stronger environmental protections. We know now that in the final deal Canada lost out on all these fronts.

NAFTA 2.0 also makes medications even more expensive. The extension of patents on specific drugs means costs for people living with rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's and other chronic conditions will increase. Hello, anybody in there? Canadians are calling for a national pharmacare plan. This deal makes it more expensive to implement.

We in Windsor and Essex County know the hard reality of trade agreements negotiated in haste to advance a corporate agenda. It appears the current government has learned nothing.

It is time we change how these deals are done. It is time we put people first. It is time multinationals, banks and—

International TradeStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order. The hon. member for Prince Albert.

President George BushStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Randy Hoback Conservative Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay my deepest respect to the Bush family on the passing of a great friend to Canada, the 41st president of the United States, George Herbert Walker Bush. President Bush had a long and successful record of serving the American people before taking his chair in the oval office.

His strong leadership would help end Communism in the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union would collapse as the winds of freedom and democracy blew across eastern Europe and Ukraine.

It was President Bush and former Conservative prime minister Brian Mulroney who spearheaded the North American Free Trade Agreement. In 1992, he called the agreement, “the beginning of a new era”, and a new era it was. It was a partnership and a friendship that benefited all three countries.

At the completion of his term, Bush left a letter in the oval office for incoming President Bill Clinton. In it there was no hostility, no animosity, no name calling, just encouragement, kindness and well wishes. Bush was always a gentleman who brought honour to the office in which he served.

On behalf of the Conservative Party, may I offer all Americans our sincerest condolences.