House of Commons Hansard #306 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was targets.

Topics

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, yes, absolutely, there have been meticulous preparations involving, of course, the RCMP and other national police and security agencies, as well as the local and provincial authorities in Quebec. The co-operation and collaboration has been absolutely seamless. The professionals in our police services federally, provincially, and municipally are determined to make sure that this event occurs successfully and safely.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d’Orléans—Charlevoix, QC

Madam Speaker, not all law enforcement in charge of ensuring public safety at the G7 are ready nor do they have the all the equipment that they need to deal with the various potential forms of disturbances. The media has had a lot to say about that.

Can the Liberals take responsibility, deal with this worrisome situation immediately, reassure those affected by the G7 summit, and tell the public that it will be adequately protected and that the government will compensate taxpayers for any adverse consequences?

Public SafetyOral Questions

June 1st, 2018 / 11:40 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, the public can have absolute confidence in the police and security agencies of both Canada and Quebec, and the local municipal authorities in the communities affected.

The preparations have been thorough. The officials have been working on this for months to ensure that the Canadian public will be safe, that the attendees at the summit will be safe, and that this event can be conducted successfully and safely for all concerned.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Madam Speaker, the Auditor General has chastised the government for failing to address matters of significance to first nations, in particular those living on reserves. In assessing well-being, he reports that the government failed to consider health, environment, language, and culture, coupled with failed meaningful engagement. These are basic rights accorded under the UNDRIP and the UN sustainable development goals that the government professes to endorse.

Why then did the Liberals oppose our amendments to Bill C-57 and Bill C-69 intended to extend those very rights and duties?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Rainy River Ontario

Liberal

Don Rusnak LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services

Madam Speaker, our government welcomes the recommendation of the Auditor General on addressing outcome gaps on reserve dating back to 2001. Unlike the former government, which ripped up the Kelowna accord and imposed top-down solutions on first nations, we are making significant investments in health, education, housing, water, child and family services, and economic prosperity.

We are working with first nation partners on a national outcome-based framework and transformation on education on reserves. We will continue to work with first nations to improve.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Madam Speaker, this is the eighth anniversary of the passing of Shannen Koostachin, an incredible youth leader, who called out the systemic negligence of government toward first nations children. On this sad anniversary, the Auditor General has trashed the government's handling of education, calling it an “incomprehensible failure”.

I would like to ask the minister about the decision to falsify the graduation rates. A 76% failure rate was covered up to protect the minister's office. Why would the Liberals protect a culture of negligence rather than protect the hopes and dreams of a generation of first nations children?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Rainy River Ontario

Liberal

Don Rusnak LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services

Madam Speaker, we recognize that mental health challenges facing indigenous people, particularly youth, are deep-rooted and complex. We recognize that implementation and delivery of our programs and services must be driven by culture and strengths of the community.

We have invested in 45 community-led mental health wellness teams, serving 326 communities, up from 11 in 2015, and dedicated first nation and Inuit hope and wellness lines.

We will continue to work with first nations and Inuit partners, in collaboration with provinces and territories, to advance targeted strategies to prevent the tragic loss of life.

Social DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Ramez Ayoub Liberal Thérèse-De Blainville, QC

Madam Speaker, the Government of Canada and Quebec recently signed a bilateral agreement on early learning and child care. This is an important step for Canadian families because, for the very first time, the federal government has entered into agreements with each province and territory to provide more affordable child care for Canadian families across the country.

Could the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development tell us more about the impact of this agreement on Canadian families?

Social DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Madam Speaker, I will start by thanking and congratulating the member for Thérèse-De Blainville for his considerable support for affordable and quality day care for families.

I am pleased to confirm that we recently signed an agreement for child care services with the Government of Quebec, which completes our suite of bilateral agreements with all provinces and territories. This is an historic step that will support our children, reduce poverty, ensure gender equality, and give all children in our great nation a fair and equal opportunity to succeed and reach their full potential.

Democratic ReformOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Kevin Waugh Conservative Saskatoon—Grasswood, SK

Madam Speaker, once again we see the Liberal Prime Minister change the rules halfway through the game. The Liberals' campaign promise to reform our electoral system failed, so they are doing the next best thing to favour their election prospects.

By refusing to ban ministerial travel and advertising during the entire pre-election period, the Liberals are simply trying to buy themselves the next election.

Could the Prime Minister stop abusing democracy and put Canadians ahead of the Liberal Party?

Democratic ReformOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Halifax Nova Scotia

Liberal

Andy Fillmore LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Democratic Institutions

Madam Speaker, while such a charge may make good theatre, it is simply not true.

Canadians were fed up with tax dollars being wasted blatantly on partisan ads by the previous government. That was why we moved quickly in 2016 to ban partisan government ads and establish third-party oversight. We also banned government advertising in the 90-day period proceeding the fixed date election period as well for any other government program that had yet to be approved by Parliament.

By focusing on government advertising, on Canadians' needs instead of on partisan objectives like the previous government, we have been able to cut the government's advertising budget by almost one-half.

Democratic ReformOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Madam Speaker, why is this government trying to find a way to prevent political parties from using advertising to communicate with Canadians before an election campaign?

Why is it even considering violating their right to communicate with Canadians? What is the Liberal government afraid of?

Why are the Liberals trying to muzzle politicians who have ideas and agendas that differ from those of this destructive Liberal government?

Is it democratic to remove someone's right to speak? Is this the Liberals' new political tactic?

Democratic ReformOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Halifax Nova Scotia

Liberal

Andy Fillmore LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Democratic Institutions

Madam Speaker, Canadians were sick of seeing their money wasted by the previous government on partisan advertising. This is why, in 2016, we prohibited all government advertising in the 90 days prior to an election.

That is 90 days prior to the fixed date election and for any government program that has yet to be approved by Parliament.

By focusing on the needs of Canadians instead of on partisan interests, we managed to reduce the government's advertising budget—

Democratic ReformOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

The Assistant Deputy Speaker NDP Carol Hughes

The hon. member for Calgary Shepard.

FinanceOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Kmiec Conservative Calgary Shepard, AB

Madam Speaker, at finance committee this week, every single Liberal MP voted against looking at the punishing new stress test the Liberals introduced on mortgages, without even saying a single word.

As many as 100,000 Canadians could be blocked from purchasing a home. Up to 150,000 Canadians could lose their jobs because of this economic slow-down.

Will the finance minister do the right thing, ignore his mute Liberal MPs and commit to a full review of these new mortgage rules?

FinanceOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Louis-Hébert Québec

Liberal

Joël Lightbound LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, we know that for the vast majority of middle-class Canadians, their home is their most important investment, the most important one they will make in their lifetime. It is critical to their financial well-being that this investment be protected.

We have taken steps to address pockets of risk and ensure a healthy dynamic housing market. We are working with provincial and municipal counterparts to gather data, monitor the situation, and to make sure to protect the middle class in Canada.

FinanceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Kmiec Conservative Calgary Shepard, AB

Madam Speaker, the Liberal government's new mortgage rules are having an impact across the country and making it virtually impossible for many Canadians to buy or sell a home.

These changes were meant to cool the overheated markets in Toronto and Vancouver, but instead, the housing market has plunged 20%, and home sales have slid to their lowest level since 2001.

Will the Minister of Finance admit that his latest rule changes are hurting Canadian families? Will he relax the rules, from his ivory tower in Ottawa?

FinanceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Louis-Hébert Québec

Liberal

Joël Lightbound LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, we know that for many Canadians, buying a property is one of the most significant investments they will ever make.

We have made commitments and taken concrete steps to protect this investment for middle-class Canadians from coast to coast to coast. We are keeping a close eye on the situation with our provincial and municipal partners to protect the interests of the middle class and to keep the housing market stable, dynamic, and healthy.

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Madam Speaker, the first pay equity court case launched by labour against Canada Post was 35 years ago. Today CUPW earned a long-awaited victory in favour of pay equity for rural and suburban mail carriers, two-thirds of whom are women.

It is a disgrace that the Liberal government says that it is committed to pay equity, but we have seen no legislation and not a dime in the budget to back empty Liberal promises.

We are tired of waiting. When will we see action?

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Employment

Madam Speaker, I am proud to be part of a government that knows that work of equal value deserves equal pay.

I really love the fact that my colleagues agree with me. In fact, in budget 2018, we made the commitment to introduce proactive pay equity legislation. That is exactly what we will be doing.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Sheri Benson NDP Saskatoon West, SK

Madam Speaker, when the federal government unveiled its national housing strategy last November, it did not include an indigenous housing strategy, despite the fact that 87% of indigenous peoples in Canada do not live on reserve and face almost 10 times the risk of housing insecurity and homelessness. An indigenous housing strategy cannot be an afterthought.

Could the minister tell us this. Where is the comprehensive strategy that addresses the housing needs of indigenous peoples?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Rainy River Ontario

Liberal

Don Rusnak LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services

Madam Speaker, our government remains committed to co-developing a distinction-based indigenous housing strategy with our first nation, Inuit, and Métis partners. That is why budget 2018 invests $600 million over three years in first nations housing, $500 million over 10 years for Métis housing, and $400 million over 10 years for Inuit housing. This funding is a significant step toward addressing the housing needs in indigenous communities.

Our government is committed to closing the unacceptable housing gap for indigenous people.

Carbon PricingOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Conservative Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, SK

Madam Speaker, farming can be stressful. Whether it is the weather, transportation issues, or the Liberal government raising their taxes, farmers have a lot to deal with. Therefore, when the agriculture minister stated that most farmers supported a tax on carbon, I know his ridiculous statement received more than a few laughs across my riding.

What evidence does the minister have for his claim that farmers support his carbon tax, and could he please let them know how much it will cost them?

Carbon PricingOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Madam Speaker, again I am happy to stand and talk about our approach to climate action. We work with everyone. We work with farmers, we work with business people, we work with environmentalists, we work with provinces and territories, and we work with cities. I am as much the Minister of Environment for farmers as I am for environmentalists.

As we have always said, pricing pollution is already happening. Eighty per cent of Canadians have a price on pollution through the leadership of the provinces. The past government did nothing for a decade, but we are working with the provinces and territories and we are working with everyone together.

What is the Conservatives' plan?

Carbon PricingOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Madam Speaker, recently the Minister of Agriculture stated that the majority of Canadian farmers supported the Liberal carbon tax. He obviously has not been to the riding of Elgin—Middlesex—London, which is filled with farmers.

Farmers throughout southwestern Ontario are concerned about their increased input costs. These families are the stewards of our land and are using cutting-edge technology to reduce their own emissions.

Is the Minister of Agriculture willing to stand and oppose this carbon tax on hard-working Canadian farmers and their families?