House of Commons Hansard #328 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was guidelines.

Topics

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government is holding Canadian businesses hostage and making consumers pay. Having placed itself in position of weakness in the NAFTA negotiations, it is overtaxing consumer products.

Biscuits Leclerc, which also owns plants in the United States, has to pay a surtax to import its own products into its own country. It is the consumers who will end up paying for this.

Why will this government not respect our Canadian businesses and why is it sending the bill—resulting from its own mismanagement—to Canadians?

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, we certainly understand that these illegal measures have created real challenges for Canadian businesses and workers. That is why we have already set up a $2-billion fund to defend the interests of Canada's workers and businesses. This includes extending work-sharing agreements, funding for training, funding to improve the productivity of Canadian manufacturers, and support to help businesses diversify their exports.

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Dan Albas Conservative Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are targeting Canadian small businesses yet again. For what reason? It is for being small. They are refusing to allow firms with under 200 employees to apply for tariff relief. This means that small businesses are being forced to either eat those costs or raise their prices for Canadian consumers.

The Liberal plan on tariffs is to redirect that money to the large firms with the high-priced lobbyists. Why are the Liberals ignoring small business owners who are hardest hit by these tariffs?

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Richard Hébert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, as the son of small business owners, I understand the impact that government measures can have on Canada's economy and businesses. That is why we have launched programs, innovative solutions, and a procurement program designed to support early-stage research and development.

To the Conservatives, supporting middle-class small businesses means putting more money in the pockets of millionaire big business owners who do not need it. We, on the other hand, believe that tax cuts should go to the companies that deserve it, because they are the backbone of the economy.

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Conservative Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, millions of jobs depend on the survival of NAFTA, and Oshawa's auto sector is worried that no deal will result in catastrophic job losses. Last year, RBC Economics reported that 500,000 jobs alone are vulnerable if NAFTA fails, and the Canadian Automobile Dealers Association has suggested an additional 100,000 jobs could be lost in Ontario if the U.S. imposes auto tariffs on Canada.

Will the Prime Minister confirm that Canada will be exempt from auto tariffs should no deal be reached by this week?

International TradeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about some economic facts. In July, Canada exported a record high of more than $51 billion, supporting millions of middle-class jobs. We had the highest GDP growth in the G7 last year. We have created over half a million jobs since coming into power.

We are working to build on those record exports by getting the right deal for NAFTA. We are committed to defending our national interests.

ScienceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Bobby Morrissey Liberal Egmont, PE

Mr. Speaker, this government has made strong science-based decision-making one of its priorities. This was first demonstrated to Canadians when the government re-established the position of chief science adviser to Canada, which the Harper Conservatives got rid of.

What else has our government been doing to ensure that science-based decision-making continues to be a priority?

ScienceOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Sean Casey Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank that upstanding member of Parliament from Prince Edward Island for that excellent question.

Some of the many highlights of budget 2018 include $210 million for the Canada research chairs program and $1.2 million for granting councils, but there is more. Recently, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change announced the establishment of new departmental science adviser positions. These science advisers will play an important role in supporting quality scientific research within federal departments, which will help ensure that government science is fully available to the public.

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Arnold Viersen Conservative Peace River—Westlock, AB

Mr. Speaker, last spring I went to Washington and stood with victims of sex trafficking as they celebrated the major passing of FOSTA-SESTA in Congress, removing the existing immunity for companies that knowingly profit from sex trafficking. Now tech companies are lobbying the U.S. government to bring back sex trafficking immunity provisions in NAFTA in the negotiations with Canada.

Can the government confirm that a Canada-U.S. trade deal will not import the ability of companies to legally profit from sex trafficking?

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Arif Virani Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, I can confirm in the House that this government takes the issue of sex trafficking and trafficking in general with the utmost seriousness. We will always address this issue with the utmost concern.

We will take the member's comments into consideration with respect to our negotiations, both in what we are doing domestically and in what we are doing internationally.

A report is coming through from the Standing Committee on Justice on human trafficking, including sex trafficking. We wait eagerly for the results of that committee's recommendations.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Kim Rudd Liberal Northumberland—Peterborough South, ON

Mr. Speaker, in Canada, we are fortunate that a person's socio-economic background does not automatically limit the opportunities that are available to them, especially when it comes to education. In fact, Canada leads both the OECD and the G7 when it comes to children being able to complete post-secondary education in families where their own parents did not. This means that more young people are able to get the skills they will need to succeed in a changing economy.

What is the government doing to make sure that there are good economic opportunities for these young Canadians when they graduate?

EmploymentOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Jennifer O'Connell Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance (Youth Economic Opportunity), Lib.

Mr. Speaker, Canada has made great progress, but there is more work to be done. Young Canadians still feel that they do not have the same economic opportunities afforded to their parents. They are hard working, talented and ambitious and have the right skills, but there are still challenges to addressing the changing labour market.

In my new role as PS to finance, I am focused on youth economic opportunities. I look forward to working with young Canadians across this country to make sure that they are a part of our thriving economy.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Pat Kelly Conservative Calgary Rocky Ridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, Mohammad Borna has been waiting since 2006 to find out if he can stay in Canada. His application has been completed for over 10 years, but the Department of Citizenship and Immigration has failed to give him an answer, including this past summer, when another promised decision date came and went. I repeatedly brought this to the attention of Minister McCallum and to the current minister.

Will the minister today commit to a date by which a decision on Mr. Borna will be made? His family needs to know.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows that, although I am aware of this case, I cannot go into the private details of a particular case due to privacy laws.

My door is always open to engage members of Parliament as they advocate on behalf of their constituents. I invite the hon. member to approach me at any moment to discuss this case.

International TradeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Donald Trump plans to tell Congress today that the NAFTA talks have failed. It is now clear that he always hoped they would fail, so he could proclaim that he stands for “America first” at his rallies.

No matter what the government might have given up on supply management, there would never have been an agreement. The government would be at a disadvantage in the real negotiations after the mid-term elections.

Can the government guarantee that it made no concessions whatsoever in Donald Trump's fake negotiations, or did it weaken our agriculture industry for nothing?

International TradeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, we have always made it clear that no NAFTA deal is better than a bad deal. We are going to uphold this principle, because Canadians expect us to stand up for them. That is exactly what we did, and that is what we are doing now.

International TradeOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, for months, the government has been telling us that it is prepared for any eventuality in the NAFTA negotiations. For months it has been telling us that it has a plan to protect Canadians' interests, whether the negotiations fail or succeed. However, we still have not seen the slightest hint of a plan.

Everyone is worried, including Quebec workers and business owners.

Now that it has become clear that Donald Trump would rather provoke a crisis than sign an agreement, can the Liberals tell us what their so-called plan is?

International TradeOral Questions

Noon

Orléans Ontario

Liberal

Andrew Leslie LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations)

Mr. Speaker, I love being given an opportunity to share facts with my colleague.

For example, in July, Canadian exports rose to a record level of over $51 billion, part of which went to Quebec.

We are building on achievements. When it comes to NAFTA, we want a good deal for Canadians. Of course we are going to defend our national interests.

We will not sign just any deal. We will sign a good deal for Canada.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Monique Pauzé Bloc Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, after being chastised by the courts, the government was forced to redo the Trans Mountain pipeline assessment. The problem is that the government is both judge and jury, so this is a blatant conflict of interest.

The government bought the pipeline. It promised the House the project would be built. It is allowing just 22 weeks for the new assessment, and Trans Mountain's CEO has publicly stated that construction will begin next summer.

Does anyone really expect us to believe the outcome of the assessments is not a fait accompli?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

Noon

Amarjeet Sohi Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.

Mr. Speaker, we have a clear plan, and we have instructed the National Energy Board to reconsider recommendations, taking into account the effect of the project related to shipping. Second, we will present to the NEB all the work that has been done by the government on protecting the ocean as well as coastal communities.

We will move forward on this project with proper consultation and a meaningful dialogue with indigenous Canadians and communities so that we can move on in the right way.

FinanceOral Questions

Noon

Independent

Erin Weir Independent Regina—Lewvan, SK

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Statistics Canada reported that average weekly earnings dropped by 0.4% nationally and by a a full percentage point in Saskatchewan, which is now tied for the slowest earnings growth among the provinces. Governments can help boost employee earnings by enforcing fair and minimum wages. Unfortunately, Canada still does not have a federal minimum wage.

When will the government enact a federal minimum wage of at least $15 per hour?

FinanceOral Questions

September 28th, 2018 / noon

Jennifer O'Connell Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance (Youth Economic Opportunity), Lib.

Mr. Speaker, the fact remains that we continue to reduce taxes for the middle class. In addition to that, we have seen the lowest unemployment rate in nearly 40 years, and as a result of our investments, a typical Canadian family will be approximately $2,000 better off than under the previous Conservative government.

Our investments are working. Our economy is growing. We have one of the best balance sheets in the G7. These are commitments that are going to benefit all Canadians across this country.

FinanceOral Questions

Noon

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix is rising on a point of order.

FinanceOral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d’Orléans—Charlevoix, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind my Liberal colleague over there that nobody can accuse us of lacking compassion because we ask questions about victims of crime. I would like—

FinanceOral Questions

Noon

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

I thank the hon. member, but that is not a point of order, it is a point of debate.