House of Commons Hansard #9 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was projects.

Topics

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian NDP New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are taking from the poor and giving to the rich. They have Robin Hood backwards.

Today, the PBO released a report about the Liberals' $6.9-billion tax plan. Guess who benefits the most? It is the wealthiest 10%. That is why we put together a better plan that also gives dental care to four and a half million Canadians.

Rather than giving billions of dollars to the wealthy, will the Liberals work with us to bring in a dental plan for those who need it?

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, it is important for us to look at how we can have the broadest impact on Canadians. That is why we put in place a tax plan that is going to significantly make a difference for millions of Canadians.

Yesterday in the House I said that it would help nine million. In fact, when I went back to my office, it is actually 20 million Canadians who will be paying lower taxes as a result of our tax changes and, yes, it will be means-tested so that the wealthiest will not get the tax advantage. It will help those people who are most in need of help. That is important for the future of our country.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Kenneth McDonald Liberal Avalon, NL

Mr. Speaker, Newfoundland and Labrador recently experienced a record-setting and unprecedented blizzard that left parts of the province covered in up to 94 centimetres of snow, thousands without power and stuck inside their homes.

Can the Minister of Public Safety please update the House on the steps taken by our government to assist and support Newfoundlanders during their time of need.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as Canadians we stand together in a time of need. Before, during and after the storm we were in constant contact with Premier Ball and Minister Bragg. Together, we collaborated to immediately mobilize their request for assistance.

Over 400 members of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Reserves were warmly welcomed by the people of Newfoundland. They helped to clear snow and attended to the elderly and sick to ensure that those who needed help received it.

On behalf of all Canadians, I would like to commend the resilience of the people of Newfoundland, and to acknowledge the outstanding efforts of all first responders. In particular, I would like to say thanks to the Canadian Armed Forces and our Reserves for answering the call to service.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Conservative Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, MB

Mr. Speaker, Vice-Admiral Mark Norman has been cleared and it is time for the Liberals to explain why they spent 1.4 million taxpayer dollars on their malicious political prosecution of an innocent navy officer. The Liberals obstructed justice, used code words and refused to turn over evidence. The Prime Minister twice said publicly that Norman would be put on trial, even before charges were laid.

Meanwhile, our military's dangerously unreliable 75-year-old pistols need to be replaced. How many new pistols could have been bought for our troops using these unnecessary legal fees?

National DefenceOral Questions

January 28th, 2020 / 2:45 p.m.

Vancouver South B.C.

Liberal

Harjit S. Sajjan LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to making sure that the Canadian Armed Forces have all the tools necessary and that our defence policy is fully funded. We are making sure that our women and men get the equipment that they need.

The government and Vice-Admiral Norman have reached a mutually acceptable agreement, the details of which remain confidential. After consulting with his family, Vice-Admiral Norman retired from the Canadian Armed Forces and I want to thank him for his long, dedicated service of 38 years.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has failed to recognize the softwood lumber crisis in British Columbia. Over two dozen mills have closed down and forestry-dependent communities are losing their primary industries, yet western diversification, the money into British Columbia, has primarily gone to the thriving cities of Victoria and Vancouver. There have been crumbs given to the communities that need it the most.

Will the minister for Western Economic Diversification commit to supporting these desperate communities in budget 2020?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ahuntsic-Cartierville Québec

Liberal

Mélanie Joly LiberalMinister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, of course, we understand that at certain times some people across the country and in B.C. feel anxiety toward economic downturns. We understand that the growth that we have seen across the country has not necessarily been equally reallocated.

Therefore, of course we want to work with Western Economic Diversification, to make sure that people in B.C. and across the west know that we have their backs. That is exactly what my team and I will be doing on this.

Public Service of CanadaOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Tim Uppal Conservative Edmonton Mill Woods, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government recently fired a public service employee who oversaw anti-racism initiatives for speaking out against the Prime Minister for wearing blackface. She was just doing her job.

Now we have received documents that outline “duty of loyalty” training for the Department of Canadian Heritage. While that sounds Orwellian enough, it goes on to note that “Failure to observe the duty of loyalty may justify disciplinary action, including dismissal”.

Why does the Prime Minister need our non-partisan, professional public service to profess absolute and total loyalty to him?

Public Service of CanadaOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the most important duty that the government and parliamentarians have is to serve Canadians to the best of their ability. That is what we also expect from the public service, which is a professional service of the highest world standard. We expect from public servants the service that they need to give to Canadians with the expectations and requirements that go with that level of service.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Banff—Airdrie, AB

Mr. Speaker, for all their talk about reconciliation, the Liberals are shutting first nations students in my riding out of their school. Exshaw School is home to nearly 200 first nations students. The Liberals have terminated a 47-year-old agreement and cut funding for the students. The school is left with an insurmountable $1.6-million shortfall and will be forced to close its doors if Indigenous Services Canada continues to refuse to work towards a solution.

Typical Liberal lip service will not do. Why are they shutting the door on indigenous students and a school they have chosen to attend?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs Québec

Liberal

Marc Miller LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

Mr. Speaker, to put it clearly, no first nation child will go without funding. This is about advancing first nations control of first nations education.

Stoney Nakoda and the Stoney Education Authority expressed an interest in taking over the administration of their own funding agreement with the Canadian Rockies Public Schools division from my department, and we did so. Funding will continue to be provided by my department to the schools, based on actual costs of educational programming, until a new education agreement is negotiated and finalized with the first nation.

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Louise Chabot Bloc Thérèse-De Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, the Bloc Québécois and the NDP held a press conference to talk about the labour dispute affecting Swissport maintenance workers.

This shines a spotlight on two issues related to Canadian labour laws, including the anti-scab legislation. Over 40 years after Quebec banned the use of scabs, it is high time that the federal government did the same.

Workers also need to be protected in the case of contract flipping, which is when people lose their jobs and then are hired back again but with inferior working conditions. That harkens back to another era.

Will the minister finally reform the code and move into the 21st century by banning—

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. Minister of Labour.

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas Ontario

Liberal

Filomena Tassi LiberalMinister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, it is the first time I am rising in this session, and I would like to thank the good people of Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas for re-electing me and giving me the honour to serve.

I thank my colleague for her question. We have already begun to hold consultations.

I have spoken with the Minister of Transport. I have actually spoken with one of my opposition critics and labour leaders with respect to the issue of contract flipping or retendering. We know that this is a complex topic.

We have consulted, and I will continue to be consulting, with all those who will be impacted to find a solution that meets the needs of both employers and employees.

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Kristina Michaud Bloc Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, QC

Mr. Speaker, community organizations and the smallest municipalities are concerned about the delays in the federal summer jobs program.

These subsidies for hiring students often make all the difference for organizations with limited means. It is also a good job opportunity for young people across Quebec. There, as elsewhere, people are worried that the delays will make them miss out on the program.

We have some simple questions. First, when will the government finally start accepting applications for funding? Second, will it push back the deadline to make up for its delays?

EmploymentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Delta B.C.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough LiberalMinister of Employment

Mr. Speaker, we recognize how valuable the Canada summer jobs program is to employers, community organizations and, indeed, to young people across the country. We are really excited that we doubled the number of opportunities for young people three years ago and we are continuing on with that commitment.

I can assure the member opposite that we will very soon be releasing the details of the application process and look forward to 70,000 students getting benefits from it this summer.

International TradeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Leona Alleslev Conservative Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, ON

Mr. Speaker, the United States is Canada's most important trading partner, with trade totalling over $900 billion annually. On December 12, Conservatives asked the government to release all of the economic documents and analyses that show specifically how this new deal will affect our economy, but it refused. Canadians deserve to know all the upsides and downsides of this deal before we agree to sign it.

Will the government immediately provide all of the new NAFTA-related economic reviews and analyses, both informal and formal?

International TradeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, Global Affairs Canada's chief economist is currently preparing an analysis based on the December amendments to the deal which, in my view and in the view of our professional negotiating team, improve the deal for Canadians. We absolutely intend to publish the analysis once it is finalized, which will be soon.

I invite all of us as colleagues to put Canada and Canadians first and to ratify the new NAFTA without undue delay.

International TradeOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Randy Hoback Conservative Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate finally receiving a briefing today from the government on the new NAFTA, 48 days after we asked questions regarding it. For a government that wants to move quickly on this file, taking a month and a half to respond simply is not good enough. We have to do our due diligence.

When will the government recognize the fact that it is a minority government and start working with us?

International TradeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, let me begin by thanking my colleague from Prince Albert for his ongoing collaboration over many years.

We absolutely are very open to sharing and making available our officials to all members of the opposition immediately after the signing of the protocol of amendments to the new NAFTA. Steve Verheul offered briefings in December to the leaders of all of the opposition parties with the members of their caucus they chose to invite, and I spoke last week with the member for Prince Albert.

International TradeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Richard Martel Conservative Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, aluminum is one of the three economic drivers in Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean. Some 33% of Canada's aluminum is produced there. Our region will be one of those hardest hit by CUSMA. To mitigate the impact of this imperfect agreement on our region, I reached out to the government to propose constructive, tangible solutions.

Does the government plan to work with us, the Conservatives, to move the aluminum sector forward?

International TradeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I said to the Bloc Québécois, we are absolutely open to constructive proposals from our colleagues on the other side of the House.

As far as the aluminum sector is concerned, I want to point out that when the new NAFTA is ratified, 70% of a vehicle's content in North America will have to be made in North America. Today, that number is 0%. I think that 70% is better than 0%.

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Liberal Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, January 22 was a historic day for all Franco-Ontarians. We learned that the proposed Ontario French-language university will be moving forward thanks to the leadership of this government, which supported the Franco-Ontarians who rallied to make their French-language university a reality at last.

Can the Minister of Official Languages tell us more?

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Ahuntsic-Cartierville Québec

Liberal

Mélanie Joly LiberalMinister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, as a Franco-Ontarian, you should celebrate with me.

I thank my colleague from Ottawa South for his question.

Indeed, it is a great victory, a historic agreement. We can now celebrate the creation of the first French-language university in Ontario by and for francophones. This victory was won by the Franco-Ontarians, Acadians and Quebeckers who came together to condemn the Ford government's Conservative cutbacks in late 2018.

We will always stand with francophones from across the country to defend the French fact.