House of Commons Hansard #30 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was huawei.

Topics

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, the very first thing this government did in 2015 when we got elected was to raise taxes on the wealthiest 1%, so that we could lower them for the middle class. What did the NDP do? They voted against it.

Every step of the way we have been there to support the middle class, to support people working hard to join it and to make sure Canadians got ahead, whether it was with a million jobs created over the past five years or a million people lifted out of poverty at the same time. We will continue to fight for Canadians and for their success.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Conservative Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government has finally admitted that its China policy is not working. That is why it is going to introduce a new framework on China.

Meanwhile, China has been running covert operations here in Canada, targeting Canadians and jeopardizing Canadians' rights and freedoms. When will the government introduce a real plan to thwart China's operations here in Canada?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his question.

Even with the Conservative motion moved today, we were prepared to propose constructive amendments to move forward. I have always said that we want to work with both sides of the House on matters of national security and foreign policy.

The new framework that we will be introducing is a natural evolution. China in 2020 is not the same as China in 2016. Therefore, Canada, like other liberal democracies, is developing plans to respond to that new reality.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Conservative Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, I hope that the government will vote for our motion tomorrow.

In May last year, the government said it would make a decision on Huawei before the election, and then in July it said it would make a decision on Huawei after the election. It has now been more than a year since the election and still no decision. The government also says that it believes in multilateralism, but four of the Five Eyes have already made a decision to restrict Huawei from their networks. Canada is unilaterally alone in not making a decision.

When will the government join with its allies and make a decision on Huawei's participation in Canada's 5G network?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Liberal

William Amos LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, the government is going to continue to ensure that Canadian networks are kept safe and secure, and we have been consistent on this point for many months now.

While we will not comment on any specific companies, an examination of 5G technologies and a review of security and economic considerations is ongoing. We are going to weigh these matters with allies and partners and with our security experts, and we are going to make the best decision for Canadians, not on the basis of politics.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, the public safety minister says he does not “tolerate hostile foreign actors threatening [Canadians]”, but China's Operation Fox Hunt continues without real action to charge and arrest state-sponsored bullies terrorizing Canadians. This morning, the foreign affairs minister said the public safety minister will bring forward measures to protect the safety and security of Canadians.

To the minister, and for all those being harassed and bullied by China's Communist regime, what exactly are those actions and when will they be implemented?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear that we know the activities of hostile state actors are prevalent in this country. They use their intelligence and security services to threaten and intimidate individuals outside their country, and when individuals in Canada are subjected to harassment, manipulation or intimidation by foreign states, these activities constitute a threat to Canada's sovereignty and to the safety of all Canadians. That is why I want to assure them that our security agencies and law enforcement agencies are actively taking steps to protect them, their personal information and their interests, both domestic and foreign, from the threat of foreign interference and espionage.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, he recognizes this reality, but on China, these Liberals are clearly falling behind our allies and they are failing to protect the safety and security of Canadians. In one year, Operation Fox Hunt coerced 680 people around the world with stark options: return to China or commit suicide. Families in China are threatened or arrested to force compliance. Canada's national security committee report said that part of this operation is even carried out here at home in RCMP offices.

The U.S. has already made arrests, so how far does this go? How many Canadians will be harmed before the government, this minister, actually does something?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, again, I would reiterate that we are taking a whole-of-government approach to protecting the interests of Canadians and the security of Canadians. Our security and intelligence community, including CSIS and the RCMP, are actively investigating threats of foreign interference and espionage, and where the evidence exists, we will take action.

In addition to that, we have undertaken a significant outreach campaign to sensitize Canadians, Canadian companies and other stakeholders involved in this activity or subject to this activity. We will take the steps necessary to keep Canadian interests safe.

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Richard Martel Conservative Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Chinese Communist Party is working relentlessly to expand its economic, military and diplomatic spheres of influence. The extent of its influence came into sharper focus recently as we confronted the global pandemic that originated in China.

The World Health Organization is being influenced by China, because WHO scientists are having a hard time conducting their investigation into the origins of the virus.

Why is the government blindly trusting compromised information?

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is concerning to hear the member opposite talk about the World Health Organization being under the influence of China. Listen, we know that the World Health Organization, like every organization, will have to conduct a review of how it managed the global pandemic, but we also know that the institution plays a critical role in beating back not only COVID-19 but diseases like Ebola, HIV-AIDS and the measles.

We need global action on disease. It is what protects us all.

HealthOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Richard Martel Conservative Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the forces of the Chinese Communist Party are at work and are threatening the Government of Canada.

By blindly trusting compromised information, the government is putting Canadians' lives at risk. It did not listen to Canadian experts, it cut funding for the Global Public Health Intelligence Network, and it cast doubt on the asymptomatic transmission of COVID-19.

Who does the government answer to, Canadians or the Chinese regime?

HealthOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, every step of the way, we have relied on public health experts and officials, people who have epidemiological advice and virologists to guide our response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We have worked with international partners. We have done the work that is needed to protect Canadians and we are going to continue that work. This is a global incident, a public health crisis, and we have to rely on science as the way out.

It is concerning to hear the member opposite not understand that science is the way out of this crisis. In fact, we will work strongly with all partners to ensure that we support provinces, territories and Canadians.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yves-François Blanchet Bloc Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have another quick question for the Prime Minister.

Canada has invested well over $100 billion in a massive shipbuilding policy. Basically, two-thirds are going to Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax, and one-third is going to Seaspan Shipyards in British Columbia. Less than 3% is going to the Davie shipyard in Quebec City, which is bigger, more reliable and accounts for 50% of Canada's shipbuilding capacity.

Today, we learned from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that Canada could have saved between $2 billion and $3 billion by purchasing two supply ships, the Asterix and Obelix, from the Davie shipyard.

What is the Liberals' problem with the Davie shipyard and the Quebec City region?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Gatineau Québec

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, there is no problem between the government and the Davie shipyard because we are the ones who began talks to have Davie become a partner in the national shipbuilding strategy.

We will continue to work with the Davie shipyard. To date, $2.1 billion has been awarded. Other contracts are being negotiated. Davie is a very important partner for the Government of Canada. We are proud to work with Davie and proud of Davie workers.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

November 17th, 2020 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government had a choice. It could either award contracts to the Davie shipyard at a cost of $1.4 billion, or it could have the work done under the shipbuilding strategy at a cost of more than $4 billion.

That is a difference of $2.6 billion. That is how much the government was prepared to waste to avoid awarding contracts to the Davie shipyard. That is the cost of not doing business with Quebec. The government threw taxpayer money out the window, totalling $150 for every Quebec taxpayer, to avoid giving business to the best shipyard in North America.

When will the government award Davie its fair share of the contracts, which would be 20% instead of 3%?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Gatineau Québec

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, again, we are, of course, very proud to work with the Davie shipyard, and we are proud of the Asterix and its work abroad for our Canadian Armed Forces.

According to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, comparing the Asterix and the supply ship is like comparing apples and oranges.

We will continue building the supply ships in Vancouver, and other very promising projects are in the works for the Davie shipyard and its workers.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

James Cumming Conservative Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, days after Meng Wanzhou, the executive of Chinese giant Huawei, was arrested in 2018, two Canadians were arrested by a Chinese government in an act of retaliation. However, this government is still toying with the idea of allowing China to plant the seeds of digital control in our country and freely collect Canadians' data and personal information.

Will the government commit today to banning 5G Huawei?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Liberal

William Amos LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, we are well aware that emerging fifth generation technologies are a global phenomenon, and we are going to ensure that Canadians benefit from the latest and most beneficial 5G innovations, but we are going to do this in a way that accounts for all security, economic and scientific considerations. We are going to listen to our experts, and will make a decision in due course.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

James Cumming Conservative Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, this government has underestimated the scale and ambition of China and its Trojan Horse opportunism for too long.

China's counter-espionage law says that in any case the CCP deems relevant, organizations and individuals must provide espionage evidence truthfully. They may not refuse. Even if Huawei says that it will not hand data to the Chinese government, it would not have a choice.

Does the minister recognize the security risk in allowing Huawei to operate 5G in Canada?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the member opposite understands that I am not going to discuss ongoing security or criminal investigative activities undertaken by our very able security and law enforcement agencies. However, I want to assure the member and point him to, for example, the work of the NSICOP committee, which released a report earlier this year making it very clear that China is a key and growing risk in this regard.

As has already been stated, the government has its eyes wide open. We work very closely with all of our Five Eyes partners. We are well aware of all the risks inherent to this, and we are prepared to take the action necessary at the appropriate time—

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, until recently, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal was reviewing a contract between the Government of Canada and Nuctech for the installation of X-ray scanners in our embassies around the world.

Yesterday evening, the committee learned that the contract with this company, which is owned by the Chinese government, had been cancelled. I find it unfortunate that the contract was cancelled only after Canadians and the opposition put pressure on the government. We can hardly conceive of the threat it would have posed to the security of Canadians travelling to our embassies.

Why did the Minister of Foreign Affairs approve this transaction for the embassies under his authority?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for the opportunity to clarify this matter for Canadians.

The contract was never approved. At the time, we made it very clear that this was a call for tenders and that national security was our top priority. None of those products were purchased. As soon as we became aware of the issue, we asked for a new call for tenders and instructed officials to ensure that national security is always the number one criterion in our tenders for security equipment.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to see that the government is starting to understand that we cannot trust the Chinese Communist regime.

We saw this recently in the case of a contract that had been negotiated with CanSino Biologics for the development of a vaccine. The Chinese did not deliver; they backed out. This is actually good news for us. Now, with Nuctech, the government has realized that China cannot be trusted, especially when it comes to security.

My question is simple. Can the Minister of Procurement confirm to the House that Canada will never again do business with any Chinese-controlled companies?