House of Commons Hansard #28 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was businesses.

Topics

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Davie shipyard is Canada's expert on icebreakers. However, Ottawa has been slow to award a contract of more than $1 billion for the construction of the polar icebreaker Diefenbaker.

The contract has been in limbo since 2013. Ottawa had to withdraw the order from Seaspan because it did not meet deadlines. Today, Seaspan has allied itself with Ontario and Newfoundland shipbuilders to take back the contract it failed to fulfill.

Is the government delaying the file on purpose to bypass Davie and give Seaspan the edge?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Gatineau Québec

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, Davie shipyard remains a very important partner for the Government of Canada and a major player in the Canadian shipbuilding industry.

Unlike the previous government, we continue to work with Davie to integrate it into the procurement process for different shipbuilding projects under way in Canada. We will of course continue to work with all the other shipyards across the country.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

November 6th, 2020 / 11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, that does not pass the smell test. Davie is a global leader and a national centre of expertise when it comes to icebreakers. It is Canada's premier shipbuilder with five construction berths, unlike Seaspan, which only has one. The Davie shipyard is prepared to take the polar icebreaker contract now, while Seaspan does not have the space and is struggling with delays. There is nothing that can justify the delay in awarding the contract, unless the federal government is giving Seaspan the time to join forces with others so that it does not have to give the contract to Davie.

Will the government confirm today that the Davie shipyard will build the Diefenbaker?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Gatineau Québec

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, since our government took office, the Davie shipyard has been awarded $2.1 billion in contracts under the national shipbuilding strategy. It is in the process of refitting three icebreakers for the Coast Guard. Thanks to our government, Davie is on its way to becoming the third partner in the national shipbuilding strategy.

I think our track record on shipbuilding is clear. The work is moving forward nicely. Davie is and will remain a very important partner.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Tom Kmiec Conservative Calgary Shepard, AB

Mr. Speaker, last month, two American clients of FlightSimple, a Calgary aircraft brokerage, were denied entry into Canada to inspect and finalize a purchase. These clients were refused entry, sent back to the wrong city in the U.S. and had to pay out of pocket to fly home. The government has a smooth process for billionaire elites coming into Canada but can only offer confusion and frustration for small business owners.

The Liberal government has already chased away hundreds of thousands of energy jobs. What is the government prepared to do to fix this unacceptable situation, or is Alberta aerospace to be phased out next?

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Louis-Hébert Québec

Liberal

Joël Lightbound LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

Our border services officers work very hard to enforce the rules and to assess every situation on a case-by-case basis, in the best interests of Canada and its citizens.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, four years ago, an immigrant woman came to my riding with her children and spouse. She had to renew her work permit. Unfortunately, the officials noted that this woman was missing documentation on the job she held previously and the job she plans to take on. She called the office, but there was no response. She will have to wait another 180 days. That is absurd.

Can we count on the Minister of Immigration and his common sense to address this matter immediately?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Marco Mendicino LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of our lives. Temporary visitors who are unable to travel can request to extend their status in Canada. Someone with a work permit who is requesting an extension before the permit expires may continue to work in Canada with implied status.

I would be happy to discuss this case with my colleague.

InfrastructureOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Tako Van Popta Conservative Langley—Aldergrove, BC

Mr. Speaker, since being elected as the member of Parliament for Langley—Aldergrove a year ago, I have been advocating for an extension of the SkyTrain from Canada's fastest-growing city, Surrey, into the heart of the Fraser Valley, to Langley.

This project is long overdue. It is supported by all the mayors and councillors, the provincial government and TransLink. It is shovel-ready. The only thing that is missing is a commitment of funding from the federal government.

Will the Minister of Infrastructure finally hop on board?

InfrastructureOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to making historic investments in public transit, including in British Columbia, and that is exactly what we are doing. When we receive projects from the province that are prioritized, we look at the business case and are happy to move forward.

I am happy to talk to the member opposite in more detail about this project.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Pat Finnigan Liberal Miramichi—Grand Lake, NB

Mr. Speaker, from November 5 to November 11, Canadians will be marking Veterans' Week across the country. The pandemic has changed things, but through virtual ceremonies, social media and more, Canadians will still have the opportunity to pay their respects to our veterans.

Can the Minister of Veterans Affairs please speak more on the importance of Veterans' Week?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, Veterans' Week is a vitally important week, as it provides us with the opportunity to remember and honour all those who have sacrificed so much for us. This year, I know that Canadians across the country will join us, wear the poppy and take part in the many virtual Remembrance Day ceremonies.

We will always remember what our veterans have sacrificed for us. Lest we forget.

HealthOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Scot Davidson Conservative York—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, loopholes in the Liberal government's approach to cannabis legislation has communities across Canada reeling. Illegal cannabis production operations are popping up everywhere through the abuse of personal medical exemptions. The result is that prime agriculture land is being taken over. Odour and light pollution is overwhelming residents, and crime is on the rise, with law enforcement hamstrung and unable to intervene.

When will the Liberals stop compromising communities and close the gaping loopholes in their cannabis laws?

HealthOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as the member opposite knows, producers of medical cannabis have to go through a strict screening protocol with Health Canada. In fact, they have to demonstrate that they are abiding by provincial and municipal regulations.

We will continue to examine the cases, and I am happy to work with the member's office if he would like to forward to me the situation he is referring to.

Post-Secondary EducationOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Kenny Chiu Conservative Steveston—Richmond East, BC

Mr. Speaker, many recent graduates applying for student loan repayment are having difficulty receiving answers to their inquiries. When the phone lines are not dead or busy, they are placed on hold for an inordinate amount of time. The government had months of payment suspension to prepare, but apparently it did nothing. This once again proves that the government's commitments for helping our youth and Canadians in general are mere empty platitudes and lip service.

What specifically is being done to help our recent graduates, and will the government commit to rectifying their situations immediately?

Post-Secondary EducationOral Questions

Noon

Delta B.C.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough LiberalMinister of Employment

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the hon. member and everyone in the House that we are working very hard to get every student's questions answered. Yes, Canada student loan payments resumed this past week, but we are really emphasizing to students that they have access to the repayment assistance plan, if they are still struggling. We are working hard to get this information out to students. Of course, this was part of our broader $8-billion package to help students and our ongoing commitment in the Speech from the Throne to invest in student jobs and student support.

Yesterday I met with student associations in Canada. I am listening. We are there for them and we have their backs.

TelecommunicationsOral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Dan Mazier Conservative Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, MB

Mr. Speaker, this year, 82 emergency weather alerts were issued in my constituency, the highest in our country. May of these alerts were issued due to catastrophic flooding and devastating tornadoes. Thanks to the Liberal government's inaction on rural connectivity, many of my constituents did not receive these warnings, which put their lives in danger. This is unacceptable.

Why does the government continue to turn a blind eye to rural Canadians?

TelecommunicationsOral Questions

Noon

Peterborough—Kawartha Ontario

Liberal

Maryam Monsef LiberalMinister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development

Mr. Speaker, my colleague is absolutely right. Connectivity is about health and safety, jobs and productivity. It is unfair that millions of households across this big, beautiful country do not have access to this essential service.

We have heard Canadians. We have worked with them to develop a plan that they have asked for, and we will have more to say soon.

COVID-19 Emergency ResponseOral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Emmanuella Lambropoulos Liberal Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are now in the second wave of the pandemic and, especially in my beautiful province of Quebec, a very large number of businesses have had to close because they are located in red zones. For months, these businesses have been struggling financially because of the new reality we are in, and we know that the pandemic will be with us for many more months to come.

Our government has supported Canadian businesses since the start of the pandemic, but they still need us. Can the minister responsible tell the House about the new measures that will be implemented to help our businesses and better address their needs?

COVID-19 Emergency ResponseOral Questions

Noon

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Liberal

Sean Fraser LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance and to the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Saint-Laurent for her ongoing advocacy on behalf of businesses in her riding, as well as the workers who live there.

As Montrealers and Canadians across Canada fight the second wave of this pandemic, we know that businesses and workers are counting on us to get through this. With Bill C-9, our government is proposing a new Canada emergency rent subsidy, covering up to 65% of rent for businesses, and additional lockdown support that could cover up to 90% for those who are impacted hardest by public health orders.

We said we would be there for businesses and workers every step of the way through this pandemic, and that is exactly what we are going to do.

COVID-19 Emergency ResponseOral Questions

Noon

NDP

Jack Harris NDP St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, the new wage subsidy that was passed this week will not help new businesses in my riding like restaurants, which have to compare sales with those from last January and February to qualify. That was when St. John's experienced what we call “Snowmageddon”, with over 30 inches of snow and lockdowns comparable with those in the pandemic.

Will the government offer flexibility in the application of this wage subsidy program so that businesses, like those in my riding and across the country, can qualify?

COVID-19 Emergency ResponseOral Questions

Noon

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Liberal

Sean Fraser LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance and to the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, over the course of this pandemic, I have had the opportunity to personally speak with businesses across Canada, including in Newfoundland and Labrador. I heard specifically about issues like the one he mentioned.

From the beginning we have been flexible in our approach and have made serious changes to programs to reflect the needs of Canadians. We have adapted certain measures to allow new businesses to get under the radar for emergency programs.

With respect to the specific issue facing Newfoundlanders and Labradorians, I would be pleased to chat with the hon. member to better understand the issue to see if we can extend help to those businesses that have been hardest hit and may need support so that they are still here on the back end of this pandemic.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

Noon

Green

Paul Manly Green Nanaimo—Ladysmith, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada has failed to meet our commitments to foreign aid. We have failed to meet our commitments to climate action. We are the fifteenth-largest arms exporting nation. We are considering purchasing offensive F-35 stealth fighter jets. We have engaged in NATO wars of aggression and regime change. We have not signed the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. We recently failed to gain a seat on the UN Security Council.

Will the government conduct a full review of Canadian foreign policy and the role that this country plays in world affairs? On foreign affairs, we are getting an F.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I disagree with that, but I would like to thank the member for giving me the opportunity to talk about Canada's leadership around the world.

Canada has been at the forefront when it comes to, for example, the issues around Belarus. I was just in Europe about three weeks ago to bring Canada's support to the leading democratic candidate.

As for Uighurs, something a lot of members in the House have been concerned about, Canada has been at the forefront of this issue to make sure that we have international action.

When it comes to Hong Kong, Canada was the very first country in the world to suspend the extradition treaty between Canada and Hong Kong.

We are leading around the world, and we will continue to do just that.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Conservative Bruce Stanton

This concludes question period for today.

The hon. member for Beloeil—Chambly.