House of Commons Hansard #19 of the 44th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-2.

Topics

Government GrantsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Blake Desjarlais NDP Edmonton Griesbach, AB

Mr. Speaker, four years ago, the federal government promised funding for the LGBTQ community capacity fund to help make up for decades of systemic discrimination, but it will run out of funding this March. The government cannot expect to repair harm and discrimination with only one round of grants. It must keep its promise.

Will the Liberals give the 2SLGBTQI community the long-term stable financial support we need?

Government GrantsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Housing and Diversity and Inclusion

Mr. Speaker, we as a government have always stood up for the rights of the LGBTQ2 community domestically and abroad. We always consult with the community on ways to increase the capacity of community organizations, including in the LGBTQ2 community, to serve more Canadians and to serve fellow community members.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison NDP Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, BC

Mr. Speaker, in addition to falling short on funding capacity building for 2SLGBTQI organizations in Canada, the Liberals are also failing to do their part to defend our rights abroad, this in an increasingly dangerous world where in countries like Afghanistan being queer is now literally a death sentence. One simple and effective step that community advocates and New Democrats have been calling for since 2015 would be the appointment of a Canadian special envoy for LGBTQ rights.

Will the government act now in this time of crisis in places like Afghanistan and appoint a Canadian special envoy to help advance and protect LGBTQ rights around the world?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Burlington Ontario

Liberal

Karina Gould LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, in my former position as the minister of international development, I was very pleased to work with the hon. member and advocates around our country and the world to ensure that Canada was playing its part to protect and support the LGBTQ2+ community around the world. We know there are so many places around the world where it is not safe for people to be who they are and to love who they are.

I am very pleased to continue to do this work and to ensure that we provide that support and protection here at home and right around the world.

Government ProgramsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Arielle Kayabaga Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year, our government launched its first-ever Black entrepreneurship program to help Black Canadian business owners and entrepreneurs. Yesterday, we took another step in supporting Black Canadians as we made an announcement about the Black entrepreneurship knowledge hub component of the program.

Could theMinister of Small Business and Economic Development inform the House on how the knowledge hub will benefit and empower Black entrepreneurs and business owners across the country? I also would like to take this moment to wish her a happy birthday.

Government ProgramsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Markham—Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Mary Ng LiberalMinister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, our government firmly believes in creating a strong and more inclusive economy. I was very proud to announce this week the establishment of the Black entrepreneurship knowledge hub, a partnership between Carleton University and the Dream Legacy Foundation. Once operational, the knowledge hub will conduct research and collect data on Black entrepreneurship in Canada and identify barriers to success as well as opportunities to help Black Canadian business owners grow their business.

We are excited and we are looking forward to the outcome and the great work that the knowledge hub is going to be doing.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Fast Conservative Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada must say “no” to Huawei. Yesterday, The Washington Post reported that Huawei was promoting facial and voice recognition software that would help it track shoppers, monitor political dissidents and manage re-education camps. This is appalling. While Canada’s most trusted allies are banning Huawei from their networks, the government refuses to act.

Again, when will the minister say “no way” to Huawei?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows that one of the priorities of this government is to keep our networks safe. We know the network is a most critical infrastructure now and for generations to come.

An experienced member like him would understand that when taking a decision like that, the lens through which we look at it is national security. We understand that on this side of the House. I wish those colleagues would understand as well.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Fast Conservative Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, for three years, the government has promised to have a decision “within a few weeks”. Our own intelligence agencies have warned the Prime Minister against allowing Huawei into our 5G networks. It turns out, they were right.

For years, Huawei denied that it was a tool of the Communist regime in Beijing. Now we have evidence that the company is deeply implicated in designing surveillance tools to keep track of millions, if not billions, of people around the world.

Is that acceptable to the minister, and will he make a decision on Huawei before the year end, yes or no?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, he is a very senior member on the other side of the aisle and understands these issues. Canadians watching understand—

Public SafetyOral Questions

December 16th, 2021 / 2:50 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Order, please. I will let the minister continue.

The hon. Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne Liberal Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, I thank you for making sure I can continue to explain for my esteemed colleague the importance of the network in Canada.

Just before Christmas, Canadians are watching question period, I am sure, and one thing they understand is that we on this side of the aisle understand what national security is about and we will make the right decision for this generation and future generations.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, how much more evidence does the Prime Minister need to ban Huawei?

This week we learned from the Washington Post that Huawei was promoting its products to governments saying that they could use voice recognition on citizens and even surveil politicians of interest.

The Prime Minister knows that under the Chinese Communist regime, businesses are required to provide information to the regime on demand. Having this technology in Canada guarantees that information on Canadians could be made available to the Chinese Communist regime.

Will the Prime Minister commit to banning Huawei by the end of the year?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his important question. He is well versed in matters of national security so he will certainly understand the importance of telecommunications networks today and for future generations.

My colleague, Quebeckers and Canadians watching us today expect this government to take national security seriously and they know that is the case. We will do what is best for the country.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, I do indeed know a thing or two about security, and we know that four of the countries in the Five Eyes alliance, which Canada is a part of, have decided to ban Huawei because it poses a threat to their national security.

Why is Canada incapable of understanding that Huawei must be banned from 5G development for national security reasons? Yet more evidence came to light this week in the Washington Post. Huawei is known to have technology used for spying on citizens, and information can be transmitted to the Chinese Communist regime.

When will Canada ban Huawei? Will it do so before the end of the year?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Maurice—Champlain Québec

Liberal

François-Philippe Champagne LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, that is an important question, and I thank my colleague for asking it. Canadians tuning in today just before Christmas certainly understand the importance of telecommunications networks.

I have tremendous respect for my colleague, who understands the importance of national security better than anyone. I am sure that, in his heart of hearts, he wants us to make the decision that is in Canadians' best interest and puts national security first.

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Montarville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the science on COVID‑19 is clear. No one in the world is safe until everyone in the world is.

We will never get out of this pandemic if we have to keep battling new variants emerging from countries that have low vaccination rates because of a lack of resources.

It is not rocket science. The government must waive patents on the vaccines so that developing countries can produce their own and administer them quickly. Ottawa must also provide logistical support where required.

Will the government put pressure on other countries and on the industry to get patents waived more quickly?

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for that important question. He is absolutely right, and that is one of the options we are looking at.

That said, right now, we need to focus on getting eligible Canadians double- and triple-vaccinated. We are heading into an omicron wave that will be very tough and trying for our country.

We have already promised 200 million vaccine doses to the global effort and they will be delivered by the end of 2022. We have also promised a $2.5‑billion contribution to help developing countries administer these vaccines as quickly as possible.

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Montarville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister does not seem to understand that the variants are developing because of the low vaccination rate around the world.

Negotiations on the vaccine patent waiver for developing countries are at a standstill. We see that Canada's passiveness is contributing to putting entire populations at risk. It is turning these countries into potential sources of variants against their will, instead of letting them have vaccine manufacturing facilities that would increase worldwide vaccination rates.

Will the government commit to applying pressure internationally, at the WTO in particular, so that rich countries and their pharmaceutical companies will finally agree to this essential patent waiver?

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Markham—Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Mary Ng LiberalMinister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear that our government has always been and will always be a strong advocate for vaccine equity. Canada is taking leadership at the WTO to work with the international community to ensure the global trading system continues to remove—

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

One moment, please. The hon. member for La Prairie.

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Alain Therrien Bloc La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we cannot hear the French interpretation.

HealthOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The translation is now going through. I would ask the hon. minister to start over again so she can be heard in both official languages.

The hon. minister.

HealthOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Mary Ng Liberal Markham—Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, let me be clear that our government has always been and will always be a strong advocate for vaccine equity everywhere around the world. Canada is taking leadership at the WTO and working with the international community to ensure the global trading system can contribute to removing barriers to vaccine access.

I just had a meeting with the Ottawa group members this morning. We are advancing issues that not only include IP, but also supply chain, production and export restrictions. Our government is going to continue to do this very important work with the international community—