House of Commons Hansard #109 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Rhéal Fortin Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice seemed to be having technical problems on Monday. He was unable to answer my question about the appointment of his generous donor to the Superior Court, as he announced on Twitter.

Today I am asking the Prime Minister to apologize for his minister and commit to ensuring that donating to the Liberal Party is no longer a criterion for a judicial appointment.

Will he make that commitment in no uncertain terms?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, that is not a criterion whatsoever.

In 2006, we made major reforms to the process to close the loopholes in the process under the previous government. We strengthened the role of the independent judicial advisory committees. We implemented a more rigorous, more open and more accountable system that better reflects Canada's diversity. Our appointments are based on merit and on the needs of the courts and each candidate's area of expertise.

We are proud of the highly qualified jurists we have appointed. They are from different backgrounds and of different political stripes.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Rhéal Fortin Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is more of the same.

The process is not independent and it never will be as long as the Prime Minister's Office and Cabinet keep interfering in it. Members will recall that, in 2019, this supposedly independent process led to five of the six judges appointed in New Brunswick having ties to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs. Three of them were personal donors, and the other two were the wife of his brother-in-law and a neighbour. There is a word for that and it is called patronage, systemic patronage.

Will the Prime Minister finally make the process for appointing judges impartial, or will he continue to defend patronage?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, when we came to power in 2015, we implemented a more rigorous, more open and more accountable system that better reflects Canada's diversity when appointing high-quality jurists to our federal courts.

Our appointments are always based on merit, the needs of the courts and each candidate's area of expertise. We are proud of the highly qualified jurists we have appointed since we implemented our enhanced system. They are from different backgrounds and of different political stripes.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, through Bill C-10, the Liberals are attacking freedom of expression and web neutrality. On Monday, the Liberal members of the committee voted against our motion to protect Canadians' freedom on social media.

Can the Prime Minister tell us why he insists on giving the CRTC more power to regulate the web and thereby attack the freedom of expression of thousands of Canadians?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are all disappointed, but not surprised, to see the Conservatives attack the cultural sector once again. The justice department's analysis confirms that Bill C-10 is consistent with the freedom of expression protected by the Charter.

Bill C-10 seeks to level the playing field between Canadian creators and web giants. It forces powerful foreign broadcasters to provide information on their revenues, make financial contributions to Canadian stories and music and enable different audiences to discover our culture. It is not an attack on freedom of expression.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is what Canadian Heritage officials said. They clearly stated that removing proposed section 4.1 allowed the CRTC to legislate the content of social media platforms, training apps, video games, websites and even audio books. Former senior CRTC officials said it was a big mistake. Experts in the field have condemned the Liberal attempt to attack net neutrality, and thousands of Canadians have spoken out against the Liberal government's attempt to take control.

Why is the Prime Minister refusing to listen to common sense?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the real question is why the Conservatives keep attacking the cultural sector, content creators, our artists and our musicians.

It defies explanation. Not only do these artist contribute to our sense of identity and pride, but they also make a huge contribution to our economy. We recognize that, in an increasingly digital world, Internet giants are not doing their part to support content creators in Canada. That is why the cultural sector supports our bill.

We will proceed, and we hope the Conservatives will stop blocking assistance the cultural sector needs.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is depressing to hear our Prime Minister. The fact is that he is proving his opposition to net neutrality, he is attacking the freedom of expression Canadians enjoy on social media and he is looking for any means possible to give the CRTC more powers.

If he had been sincere in his desire to help the country's artists, he would have accepted our amendment on Monday. The Prime Minister is himself solely responsible for the failure of Bill C-10, along with his Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Why is he insisting on going down this path?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we would like to see the Conservatives be more constructive during committee deliberations, and not filibuster as they are doing now.

Several representatives of the creative industries offered this bill their complete support, and we will continue to move forward on their behalf.

With regard to net neutrality, Bill C-10 seeks to promote Canadian music, stories and creative works. It does not affect the work nor the activities of Canadian Internet service providers and therefore has no impact on Canada's commitment to net neutrality.

Small BusinessOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Emmanuel Dubourg Liberal Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I was delighted to launch the Black entrepreneurship loan fund earlier this week, alongside the Minister of Small Business. The fund is the first of its kind in Canada. Black entrepreneurs can apply for loans of up to $250,000 to start, grow and expand their businesses.

Can the Prime Minister explain how this fund fits into our government's approach to empowering these entrepreneurs?

Small BusinessOral Questions

June 2nd, 2021 / 3:10 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I would first like to thank the hon. member for Bourassa for his hard work to combat systemic racism.

The loan fund is just one of the three pillars of the Black entrepreneurship program. To ensure that the program supports the success of Black entrepreneurs and business owners, we have increased its funding to $400 million. We recognize that systemic racism also exists in the business world, and the loan fund is a step towards meaningful, long-term change.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, with Bill C-10, the government would promote and demote content based on its level of Canadianness.

Last week, I asked the Prime Minister if he thought the film Ultimate Gretzky fit within this category of Canadian. He seemed to think so, and of course most Canadians would also think so. After all, it is a film about a famous Canadian, and it is largely filmed in Canada. However, surprisingly, it is not. It is not Canadian. It does not make the cut, which is odd.

Under Bill C-10, what exactly will make the cut, Mr. Prime Minister?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I would like to remind hon. members to place their questions through the Speaker and not directly to each other.

The Right Hon. Prime Minister.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, Bill C-10 aims to level the playing field between creators and web giants. It requires big, powerful foreign streamers to provide information on their revenues in Canada, contribute financially to Canadian stories and music, and make it easier for individuals to discover our culture.

That is the part this government has always stood for, defending Canadian creators, defending Canadian content and promoting it the same way Canada has for decades by ensuring that there is a Canadian proportion on radio shows and TV networks. It is something we have always done to protect Canadians and Canadian culture, and we will continue to do so.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is clear the Prime Minister has zero clue as to what is in this bill and the consequences it will have for creators in Canada.

Let us just try another one. Again, we are just having fun here. Canadian Bacon is a movie featuring all things Canada and stars our very own John Candy, a famous actor from Canada.

I am just curious. Does the Prime Minister think that Canadian Bacon makes the cut?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I remember well that movie, filled with quite horrible stereotypes about Canadians and Americans. I will not pronounce on it because we have a CRTC and we have a system that has established very clear rules in order to protect Canadian content and Canadian creators.

Over the years, many artists have been able to succeed because Canadian radio plays a percentage of Canadian music and because Canadian networks have to put forward Canadian shows. It is something we have done to create a Canadian media and content creator industry in this country. We will continue to do that even into a more digital—

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Lethbridge.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am not sure it gets any easier than this. I mean, I am just asking some simple Canadian cultural questions to a Prime Minister who wants to protect Canadian culture. I thought this was going to be pretty simple, but he is right. It is not considered Canadian content, which is interesting.

This is important because, under Bill C-10, the government will instruct the CRTC to regulate what is Canadian and what is not, what makes the cut and what is out. Under the current stipulation as we have explored, Ultimate Gretzky does not make it and Canadian Bacon does not count.

Again, what is Canadian enough to make the cut under Bill C-10?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this is interesting because now we are seeing the Conservatives go into an area where we have long suspected them of wanting to go, which is the idea that we should not be supporting and protecting Canadian culture, that we should not be ensuring the Canadian artists can succeed, particularly when faced with the extraordinary weight of the American cultural industry.

Certain Conservative Canadians are no doubt frustrated that Canadian radio stations always play about one-third Canadian content and that Canadian TV networks have to put forward Canadian content. It is something that has created and supported Canadian artists such as—

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Cape Breton—Canso.

HealthOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mike Kelloway Liberal Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, access to health care is a big issue in my community of Cape Breton—Canso, with many of my constituents have trouble getting access to a family doctor. As we know, COVID-19 has put additional pressure on health care systems across this country and the federal government has stepped up to keep Canadians safe and healthy in these challenging times.

My constituents want to know that their government has their back. Could the Prime Minister update us on how the federal government is supporting health care in Nova Scotia?

HealthOral Questions

3:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Cape Breton—Canso for this important question and for his tremendous work for Canadians at the health committee. Every Canadian should be able to rely and have access to our health care systems, no matter where they live.

We provided $290 million to Nova Scotia through the safe restart agreement, and this year, Nova Scotia will receive over $1.1 billion through the Canada health transfer. We will keep working with Nova Scotia and other partners to keep Canadians safe and healthy during COVID-19 and beyond. We made a promise that we would have Canadians' backs, and that is exactly what we have done.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Jagmeet Singh NDP Burnaby South, BC

Mr. Speaker, the horrible discovery of 215 indigenous kids demands action. That is what our opposition day motion lays out.

I am asking the Prime Minister if he will he support this motion, which lays out that he is to stop taking indigenous kids and residential school survivors to court, implement all 94 calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, support the residential school survivors with the supports they need, and make sure that a progress report is put forward, so we know that progress is being made.

Will the Prime Minister support our motion, yes or no?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

3:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, when we first came into office, we accepted all the calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which is something that the Conservatives and the NDP criticized us heartily for.

We have moved forward consistently on delivering on those. We have moved forward on funding new schools and new health systems, settling land claims, moving forward on self-government agreements, ending boil water advisories. However, with all that we have done, we know there is so much more to do. We look forward to working with all parliamentarians to continue to deliver as we walk toward reconciliation together.