Elsewhere

Crucial Fact

  • His favourite word was budget.

Last in Parliament November 2005, as Liberal MP for Hamilton East—Stoney Creek (Ontario)

Lost his last election, in 2006, with 35% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Parliament of Canada November 16th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister made a commitment to Canadians on national television and he is going to be consistent with that commitment. While the hon. member makes the comments that she does, in fact the opposition members are not operating at all in the public interest. They are operating in their own narrow partisan interests.

Two-thirds of Canadians said they wanted to wait for Justice Gomery's second report. That is the commitment the Prime Minister made to Canadians. He made it on national television. The Prime Minister will ensure that he meets that commitment. If in fact this Parliament does dissolve, it will be 100% the responsibility of the opposition parties.

Parliament of Canada November 16th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member has just recently come to this place and he is certainly welcome by all other members, but the hon. member should understand that we are in fact in a parliamentary democracy that operates on a principle that a government must have the confidence of Parliament.

If the hon. member wants to in fact demonstrate that he does not have the confidence in the government, then what is required is a motion of non-confidence on the floor of the House of Commons. Confidence is like an on-off switch. One either has it or one does not. If there is a suggestion we do not, then put the motion forward.

Parliament of Canada November 16th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, once again the opposition is suggesting that it should be able to vote non-confidence in the government today and have the consequences some time in January.

Opposition members have asked this question over and over again. I think the reason they are asking this question over and over again is because the leader of the NDP is fearful of the fact that so many people have said there was absolutely nothing wrong with having an election as indicated by the Prime Minister in his commitment to Canadians. Today he is attempting to backtrack and is afraid to accept the fact that either we have confidence or we do not. If we do not, have the courage to put something forward.

Canada's military mission in Afghanistan November 15th, 2005

moved:

That this Committee take note of Canada's military mission in Afghanistan.

Parliament of Canada November 15th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, what opposition members are suggesting is not a compromise. What they are suggesting is that they would want to be able to vote non-confidence in the government today, only to have the consequences of that vote sometime in January.

We are in a parliamentary democracy that operates on the principle that a government must have the confidence of Parliament. We either have confidence or we do not. If we do not have that confidence, the opposition parties can put forward a non-confidence motion.

We are here to make this Parliament work for Canadians and keep the Prime Minister's commitment to Canadians.

Parliament of Canada November 15th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, the Prime Minister has been very clear and consistent in making his commitment to Canadians. On national television, he told Canadians that he would call an election within 30 days of Mr. Justice Gomery's second report. Canadians deserve all the facts and they deserve to have their say on the basis of those facts.

This morning, when we were on CBC Radio, it was the leader of the NDP who was sitting there with the Canadian taxpayers coalition arguing for an earlier election, while I sat with Phil Fontaine arguing to ensure that this Parliament continues to work.

Parliament of Canada November 14th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, in fact, it is the opposition parties that are operating according to their own partisan interest. They are not operating in the public interest.

Two-thirds of Canadians have said that they want to wait for Justice Gomery's second report. If the opposition parties decide to put a confidence motion on the floor of this House of Commons and that confidence motion passes, we would have an election call and it would be the opposition parties that would shoulder 100% of that responsibility.

Parliament of Canada November 14th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has been clear and consistent since he made his commitment to Canadians last spring. He committed to an election call within 30 days of Mr. Justice Gomery's second report. Canadians deserve all the facts and they deserve to have their say on the basis of those facts.

What the opposition is suggesting is not a compromise. What they are suggesting is that they should be able to vote non-confidence in the government today and only have the consequences of that vote in January. All hon. members know we are operating in a parliamentary democracy that operates on a principle that a government must have the confidence of Parliament.

Parliament of Canada November 14th, 2005

Mr. Speaker, I am not quite sure what the hon. member was referring to, but in fact this House operates based on Standing Orders and those Standing Orders are there for all members to abide by.

On this side of the House, the Standing Orders that we abide by are certainly those that members have worked on and have brought forward in order for the House to operate in a very effective manner. If the hon. member is asking whether we will be abiding by the Standing Orders and the rules of the House, that is absolutely correct.

Business of the House November 3rd, 2005

Mr. Speaker, this afternoon, we will continue the debate at third reading of Bill C-54, the first nations resources bill.

When this is complete, we will consider reference before second reading of Bill C-50, respecting cruelty to animals. I expect that this business will carry over to tomorrow. We will then add to the list second reading of Bill S-36, respecting diamonds and second reading of Bill C-44, the transport bill.

When the House resumes on November 14, we will return to second reading of Bill C-68, the Pacific gateway bill; Bill C-66, the energy bill; and Bill C-67, the surpluses legislation.

We will also then return to any business from this week that is unfinished and if time permits, consider second reading of Bill C-61, the marine bill.

November 15 and November 17, as the hon. member across the way would have known weeks ago had he been at the House leaders meeting, will be allotted days. On Tuesday evening, November 15, we will have a take note debate on the Canadian mission in Afghanistan.

Accordingly, I will propose the required motion pursuant to Standing Order 53.1(1). I move:

That a debate pursuant to Standing Order 53.1 take place on Tuesday, November 15 on the subject of Canada's military mission in Afghanistan.