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Crucial Fact

  • Her favourite word was problem.

Last in Parliament October 2000, as NDP MP for Beauséjour—Petitcodiac (New Brunswick)

Lost her last election, in 2004, with 28% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Division No. 45 October 26th, 1999

Madam Speaker, in the House on October 14 I asked a question of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans. The question was quite clear. However, the lack of an answer I received was also very clear.

The rejection of the 30 day moratorium on fishing in the Atlantic region shows clearly that the minister is continuing to ignore the seriousness of the situation. The government has shown the people most directly concerned that it has absolutely no leadership. Through its clumsy handling of the situation the government has struck fear into the hearts of fishers in the towns and villages throughout Atlantic Canada. My question was very clear. What has the government done and what does it intend to do to restore a feeling of security and peace of mind to people in native and non-native communities?

The lack of the government's seriousness in regard to this very serious question shows how it does not understand the seriousness of the problem. The minister totally ignored the question and he tried to laugh at it. However, the answer was clear, the government had done nothing and was planning to doing nothing in our communities.

There has been no initiative to talk to people in our communities. That is clear. If we talk to people in our communities they tell us that there is a need for action and resources to bring our communities together. We cannot let the situation worsen, like the government has been doing with its lack of leadership.

The commercial fishermen of Fundy, Richibucto, Richibouctou-Village, Sainte-Anne, Saint-Thomas, Cap-Pelé and Port Elgin are wondering whether they still have a future in fishing.

Communities need to see leadership from this government, something that does not exist, at present.

We need to see leadership now, not a year from now. Both native and non-native communities need a strong government that will look after their welfare. This will only be accomplished by enforcing conservation measures and by putting in place rules and regulations that will ensure that the lobster, scallops and shrimp are there. If we do not take measures to conserve our natural resources, the victory which the natives achieved by the supreme court ruling will no longer be a victory because in 10 years there will be no resources.

There are serious fishermen who are worried. I spoke with fishermen yesterday. They are asking if they will be able to fish next spring. Will they be able to go out and fish? What will be the rules and regulations?

We should also talk about the lack of DFO officials on our waters; not only during this crisis, but before it. I went out on the wharfs this fall to talk to the fishermen while they were preparing to fish. At that point I heard a lot of complaints that there were not enough DFO officials on the water to protect the species. Now, with this additional crisis, we know that DFO manpower cannot handle it and will be further burdened if there is no leadership from the minister in Ottawa.

I hope that in the next couple of months this situation will be resolved, because there are more—

Points Of Order October 26th, 1999

Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order.

A question was asked today regarding a serious problem with a New Brunswick UI recipient. The member for London North Centre stated in the House in defence of his government “The people of Ontario are paying your bills”, meaning New Brunswick. He is the chair of the national Liberal caucus. I believe a discriminatory comment like this means he should resign from that position because he does not represent the national all Canadian—

Pay Equity October 21st, 1999

Mr. Speaker, while the President of the Treasury Board is studying the federal court decision on pay equity, I am going to give her additional material she should take into consideration in this regard during her deliberation process.

First, this is the fourth decision in favour of 200,000 employees from the federal public sector, mainly women.

Second, taxpayers are paying millions of dollars per week in interest because of the government's refusal to respect the court decision.

Third, it is time for her government to provide equality to all Canadians as we approach the new millennium.

Fourth, the President of the Treasury Board has an obligation to the millions of women of this country who are anxiously awaiting her decision.

Women in the minister's own caucus have publicly stated that it is time to finally respect and recognize the court decision and pay up. As the court ruling states, let us not forget that justice delayed is justice denied.

Pay Equity October 19th, 1999

Mr. Speaker, the federal court issued a clear ruling: the federal government must pay what it owes to its public servants under the principle of pay equity.

Will the President of the Treasury Board comply with that ruling and finally do justice to these public servants, who are predominantly women? Will the government comply with its own legislation and pay its public servants, or will it appeal once again?

The minister is a woman. I am convinced she understands the problems that women are facing. Today, she has an opportunity to show that she can make decisions that will be fair for women and of benefit to them.

Fisheries October 14th, 1999

Mr. Speaker, the rejection of the 30 day moratorium on fishing in the Atlantic region shows clearly that the minister is continuing to ignore the seriousness of the situation. This government has shown the people most directly concerned that it has absolutely no leadership.

Through its clumsy handling of the situation, the government has struck fear into the hearts of fishers in towns and villages throughout Atlantic Canada.

What has the government done and what does it intend to do to restore a feeling of security and peace of mind to people in native and non-native communities?

Special Debate October 13th, 1999

Mr. Speaker, native communities, like many non-native communities, are in some economic difficulties. The hon. member for Miramichi mentioned that. There are a lot of native communities in difficulties. That is why it is so important now that there is an opportunity for them to have some work in the fishing industry we make sure that 10 years from now there are still lobster out there. That is going to benefit both communities.

Would the hon. member agree that we could have seen more leadership on the part of his government, because conservation is the solution to this? We have to get around the table. It is very clear that conservation is what—

Special Debate October 13th, 1999

Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his comments.

We see that there is a crisis in the lobster fishery, but we also often forget to mention the social crisis in our regions. Tomorrow morning, our communities will still be facing a crisis. Tomorrow morning, children will go to school, and natives and non-natives will still be divided. It is sad; families are affected by this problem. Unfortunately, the Liberal government has refused to show leadership and take action. It has left communities to fight it out, instead of stepping in, taking control, and sitting down and negotiating.

It is very important to remember that what is involved here is not just a crisis in the lobster fishery. What my constituents are facing is a social crisis. We have worked very hard to get along, to work and eat together, and in less than two weeks, everything is being destroyed.

I hope that the minister will take this into consideration and take action to ensure that we will be able to repair the damage to our communities.

I wonder whether my Bloc Quebecois colleague would agree with me on this.

Highway Tolls Act June 10th, 1999

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-519, an act to limit the imposition of tolls on publicly financed highways, bridges and tunnels.

Mr. Speaker, the aim of this bill is to prevent the imposition of tolls for the use of roads, bridges and tunnels funded by the federal government.

As the House is well aware, tolled highways are a big issue in New Brunswick. This totally unfair tax is causing trade barriers, financial difficulties for trucking companies and extreme hardship on low income families, seniors and businesses.

The purpose of the bill is to prevent any future highway tax grabs by provincial governments, and to prevent friends of the Liberals from making millions on the backs of taxpayers.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canada Post June 1st, 1999

Mr. Speaker, rural and remote regions have seen a decline in services from Canada Post. A supermailbox cannot replace a helpful Canada Post employee.

Canada Post could find $200 million to give to the government. However, it cannot find a penny to increase rural services and provide rural route carriers with basic rights.

When will this government stop siphoning millions of dollars from Canada Post and start reinvesting in services for our rural communities so that every Canadian will receive the same level of service?

Petitions May 26th, 1999

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from citizens from across New Brunswick, from Fredericton, Shediac, Cap-Pelé and Robichaud.

The petitioners are very upset about Bill C-78, the pension bill. They would like to see it stopped. They are very upset about the $30 billion that the government is taking from them. We must remember that these petitioners are the same people who are experiencing no satisfaction because the government will not recognize pay equity, so they are falling into the same group.

It is a pleasure to introduce this petition with hundreds of names of workers and retirees who are very upset.