This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!
House of Commons photo

Track Cathy

Your Say

Elsewhere

Crucial Fact

  • Her favourite word is important.

Conservative MP for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo (B.C.)

Won her last election, in 2015, with 35% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Privilege April 11th, 2017

Madam Speaker, I also read the discussion paper that was put forward and I gave it serious thought. One of my colleagues said it best in saying that the government is trying to turn the opposition into an audience. That was a very profound statement.

The suggested changes are a big concern. To suggest that this is just about modernizing Parliament and that it is just a discussion paper, but then to move forward with a motion would really hamstring members. If the government intended what that member talked about just now, it would have taken a very different approach to this conversation. The member often talks about the former Liberal government. Look at what Prime Minister Chrétien did when he was looking at making changes.

I would suggest that what is happening right now in the House in terms of many of the issues is of the government's own making. Perhaps the member could do a bit of soul searching and consider taking that information back to his leadership. Then maybe we could have the important discussions that need to be had without the Liberals using their majority to ram things through to change the opposition into an audience.

Privilege April 11th, 2017

By whom? By your party.

Indigenous Affairs April 11th, 2017

Mr. Speaker, the minister stated that transparency is important, but it has now been 16 months since she gutted the First Nations Financial Transparency Act. This morning, we heard testimony from Loretta Burnstick from Alexander First Nation. She told us, “It's virtually impossible as a band member to get full disclosure of our finances. We have no say. We are kept out.”

Even Liberal backbenchers agree with the intention of our act, so would the minister stand up and tell first nations people, will it be months, years, or never that they will get the same access to information that all other Canadians enjoy?

Committees of the House April 11th, 2017

Mr. Speaker, I think we have had a lot of very important discussion this morning on a report that the status of women committee put forward. For some of the people who might be watching this on television or otherwise, I think it is important to understand what the “plus” in the GBA-plus name would do. It would really highlight that gender-based analysis goes beyond gender and includes the examination of other intersecting identity factors, such as age, education, language, geography, and culture. It would not only apply to women's issues and advocacy. It would be an analytical tool designed to ask questions, challenge assumptions, and identify potential impacts, taking into account diversity.

Really this is essentially good public policy. We have recommendations that have been moved forward to the government for response, and I think we have heard some speeches that articulate quite well the importance of the report and its recommendations.

Having said that, I think it is important that I now move, seconded by the member for South Surrey—White Rock:

Motion

That the debate be now adjourned.

Questions Passed as Orders for Return April 3rd, 2017

With regard to First Nations financial transparency: (a) how many First Nations bands have complied with the requirements of the First Nations Financial Transparency Act for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2016, by making available to all band members audited consolidated financial statements, the Schedule of Remuneration and Expenses, the auditor's written report respecting the consolidated financial statements, and the auditor's report or the review engagement report; (b) which bands, leaders, communities, and organizations has the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs consulted regarding financial transparency; (c) with regard to consultations in (b), what was the location of each consultation; and (d) for each consultation in (b) in which stakeholders or other individuals being consulted were required to travel, what is the (i) total of travel costs covered by the government, (ii) total of accommodation costs covered by the government, (iii) daily per diem rate to which stakeholders are entitled, (iv) total amount paid out in per diems?

Questions Passed as Orders for Return April 3rd, 2017

With regard to the announcement by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs on May 10, 2016, that the government intends to adopt and implement the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: (a) what are the details of all the consultations conducted by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs between May 10, 2016, to present, including for each consultation the (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) name and title of the First Nations, groups, or individuals consulted, (iv) recommendations that were made to the Minister; and (b) with regard to consultations in (a), what is the (i) total of travel costs covered by the government, (ii) total of accommodation costs covered by the government, (iii) daily per diem rate to which stakeholders are entitled, (iv) total paid out in per diem?

Questions Passed as Orders for Return April 3rd, 2017

With regard to Canada’s Indigenous peoples: how many Memorandum of Understanding agreements did the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs sign with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples between November 4, 2015, and February 9, 2017, broken down by (i) name of group, (ii) location of official signing ceremony, (iii) date of official signing ceremony?

Questions Passed as Orders for Return April 3rd, 2017

With regard to a federal carbon tax or price on carbon: (a) what analysis has been conducted from 2015 to present by the government with regard to the impact on Indigenous family household budgets and Indigenous community budgets; (b) what analysis has been conducted from 2015 to present by Employment and Social Development Canada with regard to the impact on Indigenous persons and families falling below the low-income cut-off line; (c) what analysis has been conducted from 2015 to present by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada with regard to the impact on (i) Indigenous persons and families falling below the low-income cut-off line, (ii) the cost of building and maintaining community infrastructure, including power generation; (d) what analysis has been conducted from 2015 to present by Health Canada with regard to the impact on the cost of delivering health care on-reserve; (e) when fully implemented, how much does the government anticipate the $50-a-tonne price on carbon will increase food prices for the average Indigenous family of four, in each province and territory; (f) how much does the government anticipate a $50-a-tonne carbon tax will increase electricity costs, in percentage terms, in each province and territory; (g) has the government calculated the average financial impact of the carbon tax on Indigenous people living below the low-income cut-off line and, if so, what is the average monetary impact on the average Indigenous family of four living below the low-income cut-off line; (h) how many Indigenous individuals does the government anticipate will fall beneath the low-income cut-off line as a result of a $50-a-tonne price on carbon; (i) did either the Department of Finance Canada or Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada conduct analyses regarding the impact of a $50-a-tonne price on carbon on Indigenous low-income families and, if so, what were the conclusions of these analyses; (j) did either the Department of Finance Canada or the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada conduct an analyses regarding the impact of a $50-a-tonne price on carbon on the distribution of wealth and income in Canada and, if so, what were the conclusions of these analyses; and (k) by how much does the government estimate a $50-a-tonne price on carbon will reduce carbon emissions?

Business of Supply March 21st, 2017

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate my colleague's responses to what have been very fact-free questions in terms of the record of the Conservative government.

I would like the member to compare and contrast the situation facing us now, as opposed to when deficits were necessary, at which time the Liberals indeed asked Conservatives to spend more than we were. There are very different circumstances. I would like the member to comment on why different solutions are needed for different times.

Business of Supply March 21st, 2017

Mr. Speaker, I have listened to the debate throughout the day, and I have not heard the government address in any terms what is a significant issue. The significant issue is the fact that the Liberals took what was a surplus, promised a $10-billion deficit, and turned it into a $30-billion deficit, with no end in sight. I do not know if my colleague has young children, but it is her children and her grandchildren who will be forced to pay for the Liberals' inability to spend within their means.

Certainly, the economy is stronger than it was last year when there was a surplus budget. Does the member agree that the minister must include a path back to balance in the budget that would fulfill the government's commitment to getting back to balance in 2019?