House of Commons photo

Track Larry

Your Say

Elsewhere

Crucial Fact

  • His favourite word is report.

Liberal MP for Yukon (Yukon)

Won his last election, in 2015, with 54% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Committees of the House February 28th, 2018

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 53rd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs entitled, “Interim Estimates 2018-19”.

The Budget February 28th, 2018

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to rise today to speak about how this government, as in the previous two budgets, is continuing to help northerners thrive. Budget 2018 will provide $20 million per year and ongoing to the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, better known as CanNor, to continue its important economic development programming.

Making CanNor permanent is a huge step forward, as for years the program has been temporary, with no indication, until the tabling of the budget, that it would be renewed. As well, of $511 millions allocated across the regional development agencies, $3 millions over five years is being allocated to CanNor to support the innovation and skills plan, $1 million of which is earmarked specifically to support women entrepreneurs in the north.

We are also excited that the mineral exploration tax credit has been extended for another year. This is instrumental to the north's mining industry.

I thank the Minister of Finance for another great budget for the north.

Committees of the House February 26th, 2018

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 52nd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be concurred in.

Committees of the House February 26th, 2018

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Orders 104 and 114, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 52nd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the membership of committees of the House. If the House gives its consent, I intend to move concurrence in the 52nd report later this day.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, I appreciate that the member stayed on one topic and elaborated on it, and it is great for this debate, but I want to ask him about something else. It is something I did not have a chance to get to.

There are three stages in the justice system: the causes to get there, what happens during the process, and then what happens after. I would like to ask the member about what we can do in the earlier stage. I did not get a chance to address that at all. Some people do not believe in root causes. I certainly do. What things could we do before someone gets there that would stop a lot of people from actually getting there?

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, the member's speech was positive and thoughtful. It was very compelling because we have all identified a major problem and it is great when we all work through it together.

The member raised a very interesting point. I am not a lawyer, but I heard a lawyer mention the other day that justice needs not only to be done but it needs to be seen to be done. He raised that very interesting point. I am curious. People read the paper and say that the judge should have done this or that, but they were not in the court. They do not know what all the evidence was. Just using the example of the average person, not with aboriginal people involved, how does the member think we can deal with that problem where justice needs to be seen to be done as well? How can we educate people better? It is a very interesting idea.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, I want to thank the member for his support of my bill on FASD and people not being treated appropriately in the justice system. I really appreciated his support. He and I tried to collect further support, and we certainly moved the goalposts.

When I go into schools, I talk about the independence of the judiciary and the importance of that. I use a pie chart. If they look at all the boxes, the one box that is not connected to anything else in government is the judiciary. That is what separates us as a modern and free democratic society. Politicians do not interfere in the justice system. We can get put in jail just like anyone else. The Prime Minister follows the same laws as everyone else, and that is important.

From what I have heard, everyone in the House understands that concept. We make the laws and the judiciary implements them. That is an important concept in our democracy.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, the justice system has a provision that in sentencing we have to take into account the history of aboriginal people. Other than that, when someone comes before a judge, they do not have that much time. The judge does not know them as a person. Most judges, until we get more first nation judges, do not know the entire different background of the residential schools or the intergenerational problems or the different cultures people come from. A Gladue report paints this all out. It describes the person. The judge gets to know the person as an individual, not just as an entity in front of him.

With that detailed information about how that person is different from all the other people who have appeared before the court, the judge can then follow the justice system's rule of being sensitive in sentencing.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, I love that question, because it allows me to say something I wanted to say in my speech, but I did not have time.

The parliamentary secretary was just in the Yukon to meet with aboriginal peoples and discuss how we are going to implement our new language program, to do exactly that.

However, I want to tell a story about a young woman. We had a circle, a couple of months ago, of young indigenous women. This woman had spoken at the United Nations. She said some people say the way out of this misery, the poverty of first nations people, or of any people, is to give them a job. She said it is all backward. It is exactly as the member said: what they need first is the revitalization of their culture, of their language. Then they have pride in themselves. Then they will have no problem getting the education we talked about tonight. They will have no problem getting the jobs we talked about tonight.

It is that cultural revitalization that gives them the same pride that everyone else has in their historical culture, and they can move ahead like everyone else.

Indigenous Peoples and Canada's Justice System February 14th, 2018

Mr. Chair, I hope that if we implemented some of these 12 examples I gave, they would start to reduce the tensions, as they have in my area. I was careful to try not to boast or talk about what the government has done, but for all these programs I just mentioned, I could have mentioned the dollar figures the government came in with to support the first nation initiatives. Some were $300,000; some were $700,00.

The self-government agreements that allowed these justice agreements that I read out were all signed. Four of them were signed while I was a member of Parliament. I think this is an example of the way forward, the way to reduce those tensions.

As I said, it is not perfect. We are taking far too long to negotiate justice agreements, but they are not easy.

I think they are an advantage over some areas. People around the world are looking at these agreements as a way of moving forward with indigenous peoples in their nations.