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Crucial Fact

  • Her favourite word was research.

Last in Parliament October 2015, as Conservative MP for Nunavut (Nunavut)

Lost her last election, in 2019, with 26% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Health June 4th, 2009

Mr. Speaker, our government wants to make sure that Canadians get value for their money every time we make an investment. We have seen the stories and we are concerned as well. As Canada's government, we have a responsibility to spend Canadians' money properly. We are monitoring the situation carefully.

Sealing Industry June 4th, 2009

Mr. Speaker, today the Liberals pandered to the special interest groups in a blatant attack on Canadian sealers.

Senator Harb's loaded political opportunisms rubbed salt in the wounds of sealers, whose income he campaigns against with the blessing of the Liberal leader.

It is unconscionable. I finally understand why the Liberal Party wants to change the EI. By the time it is finished, Canadians will all be out of work.

Consumer Product Safety June 4th, 2009

Mr. Speaker, protecting and promoting the health and safety of Canadians, especially children, is vital to our government. We want Canadian consumers to have access to the safest products and children to have access to the safest toys.

Canada is moving to take regulatory action to prevent the use of phthalates in soft vinyl children's toys and child care articles. At the same time, we are proposing new regulations that will limit the lead content in a variety of products. This proposed limit will be the strictest in the world.

Health June 4th, 2009

Mr. Speaker, as an aboriginal woman from the north, I am very concerned about this.

The health and safety of all Canadians is a priority of the government. We intend to continue to work with the provinces and public health agencies, Indian and Northern Affairs and aboriginal organizations to ensure a coordinated response to the reported cases of influenza.

Health Canada has provided additional nurses to the community, and physicians are on site. Epidemiologists will be in the community on Friday. We will continue to work closely with the community leadership and the province.

Questions on the Order paper June 4th, 2009

Mr. Speaker, in regard to a) As stated in the government response to the committee's report, response tabled in the House of Commons on April 8, 2008, “the Government of Canada supports the idea of exploring options to increase the adaptability of the [Common Drug Review (CDR)] for all types of drugs, including drugs used to treat special populations such as those suffering from rare diseases. [...] The Government of Canada is interested in pursuing discussions with CADTH (Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health), participating provincial and territorial governments, and other stakeholders, on suitable approaches to assessing drugs to treat rare diseases.”

The federal government continues to discuss issues related to the CDR with provincial and territorial partners via participation on the CADTH Board of Directors, composed of representatives from participating provinces and territories as well as the federal government, and the CADTH’s Advisory Committee on Pharmaceuticals, composed of representatives from federal, provincial and territorial publicly funded drug plans, and health-related organizations. Through these activities, the federal government works to ensure the CDR continues to make a valuable contribution to the healthcare system, and that its process works well for all drugs, including those for rare diseases.

In regard to b) Under the National Pharmaceuticals Strategy, NPS, the federal government pursued work with provincial and territorial partners to develop a Canadian approach to expensive drugs for rare diseases. However, since the 2006 NPS progress report, collaborative work on a federal, provincial, and territorial approach has stalled, as the provinces and territories chose pursuit of new federal funding over meaningful collaboration on national approaches. In addition, some provinces, Alberta and Ontario, have moved forward with their own programs specifically designed for drugs for rare diseases.

The federal government remains interested in collaborative approaches to improve pharmaceuticals management. However, such work must respect jurisdictional roles and responsibilities. Prescription drugs provided outside of hospital are outside of the scope of the Canada Health Act and hence, provincial and territorial governments determine whether, and under what terms and conditions, to publicly finance prescription drugs, including drugs for rare diseases.

In regard to c) Initial analysis on Motion No. 426 was undertaken after it was adopted in May 2008 and before Parliament was dissolved. The government continues to consider the issue of drugs for rare diseases and the need, if any, for action in areas of federal responsibility. Further work in this area will require the active engagement of provinces and territories, who, as noted above, have primary responsibility for drug coverage.

Nunavut Official Languages Act June 1st, 2009

moved:

That, in accordance with section 38 of the Nunavut Act, chapter 28 of the Statutes of Canada, 1993, this House concurs in the June 4, 2008 passage of the Official Languages Act by the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut.

Medical Isotopes June 1st, 2009

Mr. Speaker, since 2007, governments and health care providers have developed contingency measures to deal with the issue. As well, I had conversations last week with the experts on medical isotopes who are assessing the situation.

Many tests can be completed using other options. What this means for Canadians is that we are making alternatives available so that medical isotopes can be used where they are most needed.

I will continue to work with the provincial and territorial ministers on this issue.

Medical Isotopes June 1st, 2009

Mr. Speaker, I concur with the member that this is an issue of concern. I have engaged with the provincial and territorial ministers with regard to this issue. I can say that since 2007, governments and health care providers have developed contingency measures to minimize the impact on patients and that includes using alternate isotopes, such as thallium.

We will continue to work with the experts on medical isotopes to assess the situation and to seek their advice on alternatives. I will continue to work with the provinces and territories.

Medical Isotopes June 1st, 2009

Mr. Speaker, Health Canada has provided advance warning and regular updates to the provinces and the territories and worked with the isotope experts to develop medical guidance on dealing with the shortage, including examining other possible isotopes. Many tests can be completed using other options. What this means for Canadians is that we are making alternatives available so that medical isotopes can be used where most needed.

Medical Isotopes June 1st, 2009

Mr. Speaker, the isotope shortage is concerning but Canadians can have confidence that this government is taking short-term measures and looking at long-term solutions.

I have been in contact with my provincial and territorial counterparts, as well as the medical community and experts in the field. Natural Resources is working on the supply issue.

We are also using levers, such as the special access programme and clinical trials, to provide alternatives to Canadians. I will continue to work with the territories and provinces to address the issue.