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Crucial Fact

  • His favourite word is rcmp.

Liberal MP for Regina—Wascana (Saskatchewan)

Won his last election, in 2015, with 55% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Freedom of the Press November 16th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman is trying to make an argument where there is none. The fact of the matter is, we are examining all of the federal safeguards in place, including the ministerial directives, to make sure that they are appropriate in all the circumstances to respect freedom of the press. At the same time, we have invited journalists and others, and the legal community to make submissions if they have proposals to suggest how the law needs to be improved.

Freedom of the press is a fundamental Canadian value, it is in the charter, and this government will defend it assiduously.

Freedom of the Press November 16th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, when these issues first emerged, we indicated very clearly that we were disturbed by the reports with respect to the Sûreté and the Montreal police force. We inquired as to whether any activity similar to that was happening at the federal level. Both the commissioner of the RCMP and the director of CSIS have assured us that the answer is no.

All of the safeguards that are in place at the federal level are being reassessed to make sure they are strong enough, and we are welcoming any input from journalists, lawyers, or others if they have suggestions to make about how the law needs to be improved.

Public Safety November 15th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, the right to peaceful protest is guaranteed by the charter. The focus of this particular investigation was in keeping with the recommendations of the Ipperwash Inquiry, which highlighted the importance of handling indigenous protests with dedicated and unique resources, strategies, and knowledge. The investigation concluded, by the way, that there were no direct threats to critical infrastructure and no organized crime nexus associated with indigenous protests.

Questions on the Order Paper November 14th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, with regard to Public Safety Canada, PS, specific details of expenses related to dollar amounts spent by the government for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility are not uniquely captured in PS’ financial system. Consequently, an extensive manual search would be required and this would not be possible to do within the given timeframe.

With regard to the Canada Border Services Agency, CBSA, since October 19, 2015, the CBSA has not incurred any expenses for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility.

With regard to the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, CSIS, since October 19, 2015, CSIS has not incurred any expenses for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility.

With regard to the Correctional Service of Canada, CSC, specific details of expenses related to dollar amounts spent by the government for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility are not uniquely captured in CSC’s financial system. Consequently, an extensive manual search would be required and this would not be possible to do within the given timeframe.

With regard to the Parole Board of Canada, PBC, since October 19, 2015, the PBC has not incurred any expenses for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility.

With regard to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, RCMP, specific details of expenses related to dollar amounts spent by the government for the acquisition of waivers of ineligibility are not uniquely capture in the RCMP’s financial system. Consequently, an extensive manual search would be required and this would not be possible to do within the given timeframe.

Public Safety November 14th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, our national security consultations must be open and inclusive, and they are. I have met with Muslim Canadian organizations personally, and my parliamentary secretary met just last week with the South Asian community in the member's riding of Scarborough Centre. That process will continue. Meanwhile, our online consultation has attracted more than 10,000 submissions.

Canada is strengthened by its diversity, and it is in partnership with all Canadians that we are working to keep our country safe, and equally, to safeguard the rights and freedoms we all hold dear.

Freedom of the Press November 4th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, to correct the record so it is very clear, both the director of CSIS and the commissioner of the RCMP have said clearly the answer is “none”.

In terms of the review of the safeguards that are in place, the ministerial directives are very clear and we have already indicated, long before this controversy arose, that we are reviewing all of those directives to make sure that they safeguard the rights and interests and freedoms of Canadians.

Freedom of the Press November 4th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the director of CSIS was very clear, and the day before that the commissioner of the RCMP was very clear, in terms of the troubling issues that are being reported upon in Quebec in the last number of days. Both the commissioner and the director have said that is not happening at the federal level.

Public Safety November 4th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, in the committee, we have already indicated that we are willing to consider all constructive ideas and amendments.

However, I would point out that the powers presently drafted in Bill C-22 do provide the committee of parliamentarians with the authority to examine current operations.

Public Safety November 4th, 2016

Mr. Speaker, the issue was first raised in the report of the Security Intelligence Review Committee for the 2014-15 calendar year. It relates to a period long before this government came into office. That report was tabled in Parliament on January 28. That is the time when the public was alerted to the issue.

Thereafter, CSIS worked with the Department of Justice to better inform the court. Obviously the court's decision was rendered yesterday. We are not appealing. We accept that judgment, absolutely.

Public Safety November 3rd, 2016

Mr. Speaker, first of all, let me welcome the member to his new role as critic for public safety.

The objective of our correctional system is in fact public safety, and that includes effective and successful rehabilitation. The Office of the Correctional Investigator believes that rehabilitation can be enhanced with changes to the pay system. He asked us to examine that, and I have invited Commissioner Don Head of the Correctional Service to conduct a review. I am sure that the review would welcome the input from the hon. member.