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Industry committee  Properly speaking, our mandate is telecom and the Internet. We've sometimes been dragged into commenting on groceries because it's so obvious to us in our communities that many of the issues are shared across both. I don't want to overstep my expertise on this, but in addition to strengthening the bureau's hand in dealing with mergers in general, I think the market study power is important for looking at what's going on with groceries.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  I want to plus-one Professor Ross's comment that market studies powers for the bureau are very important. It's unclear to me how far what they have now is going to take them. They're shifting from an agency that sometimes prevented some lessening of competition to one leaning further into their promoting and intensifying competition mandate.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  I just wanted to add that OpenMedia does not think condition-setting works well. For the Rogers-Shaw deal, many conditions were put on the deal by the government, and there wasn't a specific condition for bidding price increases. Rogers started cranking up prices almost immediately.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  Almost no one, including the bureau, has the resources to do that kind of tracking, and it's a huge issue. Five years is pretty long for a condition; many are shorter. In many cases, companies will say, “These five years are the cost we have to pay to do a deal, but after that, we'll do whatever we want.”

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  There's tremendous value in reversing the burden of proof in these kinds of situations. We're in a situation where somehow the rules are written such that the house always loses, the house in this case being the Competition Bureau. It's been so easy in many cases for businesses to counter the bureau's case.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  I think many people in the public don't know about the Competition Bureau, because the bureau has had very few opportunities to score triumphs that get them in the public eye. Many people know that they opposed Roger-Shaw, but that didn't work out. When we look at how competition law has played out to date, it has very deeply hamstrung the bureau's ability to function.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  Overall, no. What the government is referring to when they talk about that is that data caps have gone up for many Canadians. However, if you go from 10 gigabytes to 20 gigabytes and the government calls that a halving of prices, that's not a fair way of looking at your bill. Most people's bills have gone down very little, if at all.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Industry committee  Good morning. I'm Matt Hatfield, and I'm the executive director of Open Media, a non-partisan grassroots community of nearly 270,000 people in Canada who work for an open, affordable and surveillance-free Internet. I'm joining you from the unceded territory of the Sto:lo, Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam nations.

June 10th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Public Safety committee  I think this legislation makes our privacy much worse, actually.

February 5th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Public Safety committee  I think the necessity and proportionality tests that we've applied are a really important piece here to make sure information is being collected only for appropriate purposes. I think getting those kinds of fixes, which are similar to what Australia has done, will greatly mitigate some of the potential harms of the legislation.

February 5th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Public Safety committee  I would reinforce what Ms. Robertson said. I think transparency is actually the ally of effective cybersecurity. A lot of mistakes get made when things are stored in the dark. Rather than allowing our security establishments to hoover up the maximum possible amount of information and sit on all of it, I think putting some limits in terms of retaining only information that is strictly necessary and deleting other information at a certain point helps minimize the risk of that information transfer.

February 5th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Public Safety committee  Hi there. I'm Matt Hatfield, and I'm the executive director of OpenMedia, a grassroots community of 230,000 people in Canada who work together for an open, accessible and surveillance-free Internet. I'm joining you from the unceded territory of the Sto:lo, Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam nations.

February 5th, 2024Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Canadian Heritage committee  It's a great question. I think, in many cases, it's not that the algorithms are built to amplify rage, necessarily. It's that they're build to amplify engagement, and rage is one of the most powerful drivers of engagement. I do think we need to look at what might need to change in algorithms to discourage those kinds of dynamics in some cases.

December 14th, 2023Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield

Canadian Heritage committee  It's a fair question. I think lawful but awful speech is a lot of what many people experience daily on platforms that they don't like. There's always going to be quite a bit of that speech, and you really can't regulate away things that are functionally dog whistles, because people will just find new ways of expressing that.

December 14th, 2023Committee meeting

Matthew Hatfield