House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Hockey
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

John Murphy Annapolis Valley—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to resolve an ongoing controversy over the birthplace of hockey in this great country.

As documented by the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society, the game of hockey had its origins in Windsor, Nova Scotia in the early 1800s. It was first played by the students of Kings College School where it evolved from hurley, an Irish field game. In fact, hockey was played in Windsor for nearly a century before it was played in most other Canadian towns.

I am proud that in my riding of Annapolis Valley-Hants the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society continues to promote the history of this great game, both locally and across Canada. I would like to congratulate this organization for its dedication in preserving such an important part of our heritage.

Anna Paquin
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel St. Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the residents of the riding of St. Boniface, indeed on behalf of all Manitobans and Canadians, I rise today to salute and congratulate 11 year old Anna Paquin.

Miss Paquin was awarded an Academy Award this week for best supporting actress for her role in the movie The Piano .

Anna Paquin was only four years old when she left Winnipeg and according to her uncle, Dr. Wayne Paquin of St. Boniface, she was always "very precocious, very bright, very outgoing and very talented". Miss Paquin became the youngest Oscar winner since 10 year old Tatum O'Neil won in the same category for Paper Moon 20 years ago.

Anna's grandmother, Mrs. Agnes Tuckwell, watched with a great deal of pride from her St. Boniface home as her granddaughter made her way to the podium on Monday evening and with good reason.

Once again, I extend my warmest congratulations to Miss Paquin, to her grandmother and her family.

Jury Duty
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

John Harvard Winnipeg—St. James, MB

Mr. Speaker, government should not speak out of both sides of its mouth. A case in point is jury duty.

Unless excused for a very good reason Canadians when asked are obliged to do jury duty. Most people do not complain because it is a service to our country.

But consider what happened to one of my constituents. She was on unemployment insurance when called to jury duty. She met her obligation but discovered later she lost her UI benefits while serving as a juror. What we have here is one department of government ordering a citizen to carry out her duties to Canada while another department penalizes her for doing so.

That is government speaking out of both sides of its mouth. Is this hypocrisy? Is the law an ass? The verdict surely is guilty on both counts.

Unemployment Insurance
Statements By Members

March 25th, 1994 / 11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Bernier Mégantic—Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, the recent Liberal budget cut unemployment insurance benefits by $2.4 billion, $630 million of which comes directly from the Maritimes.

Demonstrators took to the streets to protest these inordinate cuts in a region hard hit by unemployment. Three large demon-

strations were held in Shippagan, in Bathurst and, just yesterday, in Sydney where over 1,500 protesters burned the Prime Minister, the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Transport in effigy.

Meanwhile, none of the 31 Liberal members from the Maritimes had the courage to denounce this situation. Did they forget those who elected them? Did they forget their first duty is to be loyal to their constituents? This new version of the Silence of the Lambs must be denounced.

Elvis Stojko
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Ed Harper Simcoe Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to pay tribute to Elvis Stojko for his tremendous performance last night in winning a gold medal for Canada.

Elvis Stojko
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Elvis Stojko
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Ed Harper Simcoe Centre, ON

This native of Richmond Hill, Ontario is a perfect example of what can be achieved through hard work and dedication.

There is a special feeling of pride in my riding since Elvis trains in Barrie at the Mariposa Figure Skating School under coach Doug Lee. No one attains a world championship without years of dedication and the support of family and friends.

I am sure all members will join me in paying tribute to this outstanding young Canadian.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, the standing committee on agriculture has just completed hearings on whether to allow the use of BST in Canada. The entire committee process was conducted in public and open session, including the work on the recommendations and final report.

The work of the committee has confirmed the new role of parliamentary committees promised by our party during the last election. The decision to examine the BST issue, which one witness described as unprecedented attention to a veterinarian drug, was taken collectively by the committee.

Throughout the process members of the committee worked in a spirit of co-operation and commitment toward achieving a consensus report which will soon be tabled in the House.

Once the committee report is tabled it will be up to the government to respond with the appropriate legislation to implement the moratorium called for by that committee. I would hope that same spirit continues.

In that sense of co-operation, with a name like mine, I want to wish everyone in the House and everyone associated with it a very happy Easter.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, Ms. Dawn Gardner is a Saskatchewan health journalist who is concerned about alcohol abuse on the part of pregnant women.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is defined as a random pattern of mental, physical and behavioural defects which may develop in the unborn child when the mother consumes alcohol during the course of her pregnancy. A pregnant woman never drinks alone.

Canadian estimates of children affected by fetal alcohol syndrome are over 36,000 yearly. These statistics tell us that over 50 per cent of these children become wards of the state. The same percentage will need corrective surgeries while many will suffer from blindness, deafness, epilepsy and most frequently mental retardation.

The government must take some responsibility for this situation and make sure that measures are taken to educate people by labelling all bottles of alcohol, posting signs, introducing health programs in the schools, et cetera.

Our youth is our future. Our children are the leaders of tomorrow. Let us spare them.

A happy Easter to you, Mr. Speaker.

Parliamentary Associations
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

John Bryden Hamilton—Wentworth, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw your attention to an overseas exchange program that has proved to be of immense value to the country. I speak of the House of Commons parliamentary associations which enable parliamentarians from other countries to visit Canada and Canadian MPs to visit them. It is thus that we cement the ties of democracy while building lines of communication for international trade.

Therefore, I would hope that the House would acknowledge those MPs who are taking part in these very important organizations, especially the anglophone members who have joined the French speaking associations and the francophone members who have joined the English speaking associations.

It is when these members go abroad to France, to Europe, the Commonwealth that we show the world we are indeed a united Canada.

Francophone And Acadian Minorities
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Roger Pomerleau Anjou—Rivière-Des-Prairies, QC

Mr. Speaker, the income gap between francophones and anglophones, which keeps widening, is partly due to the fact that francophone minorities in Canada do not have management control of their elementary and secondary schools. This opinion is also shared by the hon. member for Ottawa-Vanier. After thirty years of futile struggle, half of the Franco-Ontarian students still attend English schools, and their parents are getting poorer every year.

Yesterday, in this House, the Minister of Canadian Heritage reiterated the government's intention to reestablish the Court Challenges Program.

Francophone and Acadian minorities in Canada do not need federal subsidies to pay for their lawyers. The Supreme Court has already confirmed their rights. These minorities need the same degree of generosity displayed by Quebecers toward their anglophone minority, which includes fair financing of their schools as well as control of these schools.

Justice
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, members will know that just this past Tuesday hundreds of peace officers from across Canada gathered in Ottawa to dedicate a pavilion in memory of Canadian peace officers killed in the line of duty. The pavilion is 100 yards from this place.

I met with three widows of slain policemen. With tears in their eyes, they asked me to use my influence to repeal section 745 of the Criminal Code, a loophole that lets convicted murderers out of jail after just 15 years.

In 1971, the Liberal Solicitor General said that rehabilitation is a priority of the criminal justice system and not the protection of society. Life means life.

When will Parliament's bleeding heart Liberals finally get in step with Canadians and put teeth in our criminal justice system? Protection of society must be the first priority of the criminal justice system. Life means life.

The Economy
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, it being the last day before the Easter break, it is time for a report card on the government.

House sales are up 14.3 per cent over the same period last year. Employment is up 66 per cent February over January. The composite leading index is up .8 per cent for one month. Car and truck sales are up 12 per cent over the same period last year. Merchandise exports are up 13.1 per cent over the same period last year. Inflation is only .2 per cent.

Finally let me quote the Governor of the Bank of Canada who said that the signs show that strong foundations are being laid for a sustainable expansion to our economy.

This government deserves an A-plus.

Senior Citizens
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Roger Simmons Burin—St. George's, NL

Mr. Speaker, our senior citizens are our most marvellous resource. They have made a great contribution to the country; whether it is risking their lives at war, building our infrastructure, designing our very enviable social safety net, preserving and transmitting our value system.

Everything we have, everything we are, everything we believe in, we owe to these men and women who are now seniors. Is it not time that we began to repay the debt we owe to these people, to begin watching out for those who have watched out for us for so long.

I am thinking particularly of the poor among them, the abused among them, the sick among them, the disabled. It is true that we have old age security and medicare, but it is time to go the extra mile, to reach out to those people really in need, those who want to stay in their homes, those who want to preserve and maintain their independence, those who want to live out their lives as they would choose to do it.

That is the challenge to us.

Semaine Provinciale Du Français
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Pierrette Ringuette-Maltais Madawaska—Victoria, NB

Mr. Speaker, today marks the end of a very exciting week in New Brunswick. I am referring to the Semaine provinciale du français, which began last Monday under the theme "Fêter, c'est français", and concerns all of New Brunswick, that is both its French and English-speaking populations.

All week, activities took place across the province to promote French in New Brunswick.

On Monday, I was at the Cité des jeunes, where I met lively young francophones from New Brunswick who strive to preserve the French fact in that province.