House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was taxes.

Topics

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Human Resources Development.

Yesterday, this minister clearly indicated to this House that the Atlantic fishery workers unions had been consulted about the individual contracts that workers must sign, thus committing themselves to undergo training or do community work in order to receive their benefits. We checked and the unions were never consulted on this.

How can the minister reconcile the statement he made yesterday in the House with the confirmation that was given to me afterwards by the head of the fishery workers union, who said he had never been consulted on the issue of the individual contracts?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Brian Tobin Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to the opportunity to answer the member's question and in the process to set the record straight. I know the member is much interested in having the record set straight.

The straight facts are that all major unions associated with the Harvesters Council of Canada, all provinces of Atlantic Canada and the province of Quebec, all stakeholders on the private side, and literally everybody who moves, walks, talks, breathes and has any interest in the fishery, have been more broadly consulted by the Minister of Human Resources Development about this policy-and I might add by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans-than on any other policy heretofore introduced by a government anywhere on the planet earth.

Yes, this is one of the matters that was discussed.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, no consultations were ever held on the individual contracts. Despite what the minister said yesterday and today, this is an extremely important issue as workers must sign contracts committing them to do certain things in order to receive benefits. This question was never looked at and the unions were not consulted on it.

Can the minister now promise to meet with them to discuss this issue before putting this system in place?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Brian Tobin Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the question is a bit late because the Minister of Human Resources Development and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans committed months ago, not only to the dozens of meetings we have already held but to the many more meetings that are to be held to ensure that the program is properly implemented.

Despite the very difficult and real circumstances, despite the impact on people's lives, from which none of us gets any joy or seeks any advantage, may I say that one of the reasons this has gone superbly well has been the completely open attitude, the flexible attitude, the caring attitude and the consulting manner of the Minister of Human Resources Development, and that will continue.

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

May 3rd, 1994 / 2:35 p.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

Can the minister tell us: Do rank and file aboriginal peoples in Manitoba really want self-government at this time?

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Sault Ste. Marie
Ontario

Liberal

Ron Irwin Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, the question is: Do rank and file aboriginal people of Manitoba want self-government at this time? The response would be yes.

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have a supplementary question.

In the last six months I have received over 60 examples from Manitoba describing instances of misappropriation and fraudulent use of band funds, mismanagement of band funds for unauthorized purposes, interference of band leaders in the deliveries of programs, and fear and intimidation tactics including assault and band memberships being forcibly removed from the reserves.

In the self-government agreement being negotiated-

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. I would ask the hon. member to please put his question.

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

How will the minister assure the protection of individual rights and how will aboriginal leaders be held accountable to rank and file aboriginal people?

Indian Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Sault Ste. Marie
Ontario

Liberal

Ron Irwin Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, the premise of the hon. member's question is that we cannot trust these people because they cannot handle their affairs. I do not accept that premise.

What I see out there are honourable chiefs, honourable members, 400 of whom met at The Pas and unanimously said: "The time is now. We like your policy. We are prepared to work with you", and I intend to work with these people.

Publishing Industry
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Canadian Heritage. According to this morning's Toronto Star issue a secret memo, addressed to all members of the cabinet, told them what strategy to use when dealing with Ginn Publishing. They were advised not to make any statement on the sale of this company, and also to dismiss all possibilities of inquiry on the matter by a parliamentary committee.

Could the Minister of Canadian Heritage confirm the existence of such a secret memo and tell us if this is the reason why an inquiry on this sale has been rejected by the cabinet and by the Parliamentary Committee on Canadian Heritage?

Publishing Industry
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the secret memo the member refers to is so secret that none of the ministers involved had seen it or heard of it in fact until this morning; but I am told there was some advice contained in a

communications memo prepared although I am not sure by whom.

They tell me that it said among other things: "Be boring and dull". I can assure the hon. member I have been doing my best to fulfil that qualification. It has worked so far, has it not?

Publishing Industry
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

An hon. member

Some things come naturally.

Publishing Industry
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am outraged at seeing the government turn into a farce a question dealing with Canadian Heritage.

How can the Minister of Canadian Heritage still pretend he is defending the Canadian Heritage when his only concerns are to give answers that leave no trace since they are strictly oral and to blindly follow this memo instead of trying to shed light on this sale to American interests?

Publishing Industry
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I was about to say a moment ago, the important thing that was also contained in this memo was to grind down the questioner with facts.

Unfortunately the facts have not been of great interest to the hon. member who has put a number of questions on this file; but the facts include the fact that when Investment Canada approved the acquisition of Maxwell Macmillan limited by Prentice-Hall, it approved the acquisition of a company which was in receivership.

The result of the acquisition was the preservation of about 100 jobs in Canada, as well as the acquisition of a series of undertakings given by Prentice-Hall and its owner, Paramount, with respect to the distribution of publications within Canada, as well as the continuation of as many employees as possible.

There is a series of undertakings there. We received undertakings which we think are meaningful and which made this a good deal for Canada.

The facts are not of a lot of interest around here a lot of the time, but it is time members started to take recognition of the fact that in this case we got a good deal for Canada.