House of Commons Hansard #271 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was jobs.

Topics

Taxation
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Independent

Gilles Bernier Beauce, QC

Mr. Speaker, after watching a report on Radio-Canada's program Enjeux last week, I was outraged by the extent of tax fraud in the trade of paintings and works of art.

I have a duty to urge the government to deal a major blow to tax evasion and to the tax shelters depriving federal coffers of millions of dollars in revenue.

We must axe bogus donations to museums by the wealthy and other tax shelters the average citizen cannot benefit from. What is the government waiting to make companies availing themselves of too many tax shelters pay their taxes? And why not end GST refunds to foreign tourists who make purchases in Canada?

Those are serious ways to eliminate the deficit without hurting social programs too much.

Symbols Of Canadian Nationalism
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Alex Shepherd Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the Leader of the Opposition, who recently recognized the importance of the symbols of Canadian nationalism by supplying my office with Canadian flags. I dutifully handed these out to hundreds of our citizens in Christmas parades across Durham. I can assure the member that the deep expression of love for our country and each other was reflected on the faces and in the hearts of all of these communities.

There are other symbols we should change in order to reflect the reality of all the people of Canada as we approach the 21st century. Our currency should reflect the true Canadian traditions rather than foreign monarchs. The head of our state should be truly elected by Canadians for Canadians. Finally, here and across the land, when people take the oath of office or oath of citizenship they should swear allegiance to our great nation, Canada.

Hmcs Calgary
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, late Friday 29 Romanians and one Greek man were plucked from the stormy seas of the North Atlantic by Master Corporal Rob Fisher from Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

HMCS Calgary and a Sea King helicopter were on their way back to British Columbia from the Persian Gulf when they responded to the sinking of the Mount Olympus , racing 900 kilometres in 18 hours to reach the sinking carrier. Amid frightful conditions, Master Corporal Fisher spent four hours pulling the crew members from the sinking ship to safety.

I know all hon. members will join me in thanking the crew of the HMCS Calgary , particularly Master Corporal Fisher, for their heroic efforts, the kinds of efforts we have come to expect from the men and women who serve Canada with dedication and distinction.

The Late Phil Givens
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Barry Campbell St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to praise the late Phil Givens, who passed away last Thursday in Toronto at the age of 73.

Mr. Givens personified public service. He served the people of Toronto first as councillor and then as mayor from 1963 to 1966. He served the people of Canada as an MP from 1968 to 1972 and the people of Ontario as an MPP from 1972 to 1977. Appointed to the Metro Toronto Police Commission in 1977, he became its chairman, serving until 1985. Most recently, he served as a provincial court judge. His was truly a life devoted to serving the community.

Phil was also a man of culture. He will always be remembered as the driving force behind bringing Henry Moore's sculpture "The Archer" to Toronto's Nathan Phillips Square. That bold initiative contributed to Henry Moore's later extraordinary gift of sculpture to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Phil touched many people's lives and will be sorely missed. He is an example to all Canadians. I am sure members of the House will join with me in sending our condolences to his wife Min and his family.

Member For Brome-Missisquoi
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Jean H. Leroux Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, according the December 2 issue of the newspaper La voix de l'Est , the member of Parliament for Brome-Missisquoi helped a group, which includes one of his good friends, obtained a CIDA grant of close to half a million dollars for an eight-month business trip to Hungary.

We also learned that this good friend, Daniel Barbeau, was selected as one of the eight lawyers who will participate in the project by one of the minister's associates in his Bedford law firm, who sat on the selection committee.

Assuming this information is true, how, given the current budget situation, could the member for Brome-Missisquoi manage to help his friends benefit from such a sweet grant?

Member For Brome-Missisquoi
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Dear colleagues, when making statements, members must avoid impugning motives, as is also the rule when asking questions in the House. I recognize the member for Calgary North.

Trans-Labrador Highway
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary North, AB

Mr. Speaker, the so-called Trans-Labrador Highway is a 500-kilometre stretch of gravel road running from Labrador City to Churchill Falls to Goose Bay. For half that distance the road is only good enough to allow travel at 70 to 80 kilometres an hour. The rest of it is almost impassable.

For years the people of Labrador have fought with one government after another, demanding what most Canadians take for granted: a decent, passable road between major centres.

Imagine the earful I got from Labradorians as Reform's Atlantic issues critic when they picked up Saturday's newspaper and saw the Prime Minister opening a stretch of road in West Africa built with Canadian money.

Labradorians deserve to know how this Liberal government can spend millions of dollars in Africa when our own citizens go begging for one decent road between Goose Bay and Labrador City.

Medicare
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, today I was glad to join with the Moderator of the United Church, Dr. Marion Best, and the member for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce in supporting the drive by CAW retirees and the Congress of Union retirees to save medicare.

We played a take-off on the TV game of Jeopardy, answering questions about health care in Canada. At the end we were presented a T-shirt with a caricature of the Prime Minister on it dubbed "Medicare Nightmare".

The Liberals are slowly starving medicare and with it the ability to maintain or enforce national standards. They have reneged on the commitment to repeal Bill C-91 and do something about the spiralling cost of drugs and what those costs are doing to our health care system.

The NDP congratulates the Canadian Health Coalition and the CAW retirees and the Congress of Union retirees for the creative way in which they have sought to educate the public and the Liberals about the threat federal cutbacks are posing to medicare.

Victims Of Violence
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Walt Lastewka St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, approximately one woman is killed by a weapon in Canada every six days. She is often killed in a private home. She is often killed by someone she knows. If she is killed by her partner, chances are she has been killed with a gun.

The victims of violence are often those who suffer in silence. They are our mothers, our sisters, our daughters, and our partners.

The national day of remembrance and action on violence against women is very important. It is a day for us to remember the victims of violence, those who suffer from abuse or from the loss of a loved one who has been taken from them. It is also a day of action. It is a day to promote the rights of victims, victim impact statements, the family violence initiative, more effective peace bonds, harsher sentences for offenders. These are initiatives to empower the victims of violence.

We must also continue to work locally in our neighbourhoods and communities to promote awareness and openness in helping the victims of violence. Working together, we can make our communities a safer place.

Victims Of Violence
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Kraft Sloan York—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow marks the sixth anniversary of the Montreal massacre.

At the Women's World Conference in Beijing, it was agreed that violence against women is not a private issue and that states must exercise due diligence to make sure violence does not occur in the home or elsewhere. At the same conference, Canada introduced and passed a motion that reaffirms rape as a war crime, a crime against humanity. It introduces rape as an act of genocide.

Advances are being made, but there is still much to do, still many barriers to cross, still more awareness to raise, and unfortunately more shelters to keep open.

It is with the memory of the 14 women killed in Montreal on December 6 that we continue to pursue a just society and a better tomorrow.

Manpower Training
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Philippe Paré Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, in spite of the strong opposition of all Quebec stakeholders in the labour market, the Minister of Human Resources Development is going ahead with his bill, which, in his own words, seeks to decentralize manpower training to individuals, rather than to the provinces.

It is obvious to all Quebec stakeholders that this so-called decentralization is only a farce and does not in any way follow up on the Quebec consensus regarding this issue. On the contrary, it is clear that the minister's project is aimed at allowing Ottawa to keep control over its programs, while trying to make us believe that a decentralization is taking place. Once again, this government is acting in bad faith and is showing contempt for the provinces. Moreover, it shows that is still has not understood the meaning of the results of the October 30 referendum.

Balkans
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, the foreign affairs minister is so hard-working and dedicated to his job it is scary.

Do members remember yesterday when the government promised it would carefully listen to everything the opposition had to say before it made a final decision on the Bosnia mission? Well, the debate went on until nine last night, which is three in the morning in Brussels, where the Minister of Foreign Affairs is. The fact that he was able to stay up watching the debate that late is great. Then he worked the rest of the night away to fully incorporate the opposition's ideas into the final Canadian plan he agreed to this morning.

It is simply amazing. After staying up all night, this hard-working minister was able to put the final stamp of approval on the Bosnia mission first thing this morning, and all this with the comforting knowledge that he had taken fully into account all the views expressed here yesterday. I never would have believed it could be done. But since the government always tells the truth, it must have been what happened. Right, Mr. Speaker?

Royal Arms Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Patrick Gagnon Bonaventure—Îles-De-La-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is with pleasure I draw the attention of the House of Commons to the recent improvements to the Canadian Coat of Arms. These improvements highlight the motto of the Order of Canada, our country's highest honour. Interestingly, they were proposed by a member of the press gallery, Bruce Hicks, over a decade ago. The motto, "To build a better country", is something every member of the House should be trying to do.

In 1987 the Queen approved this change for limited use in Canada. In fact everyone who has been to Rideau Hall will have seen this new coat of arms in the stained glass window near the entrance. Last year the Queen authorized its general use and slowly it is being introduced so as to not cost the taxpayers any money.

Last year I sent a copy of these arms in electronic format to every MP and encouraged them to start using them on their letterhead and publications when they reorder. The Minister of Canadian Heritage drew attention to it last month when he unveiled the latest edition of symbols of Canada.

As Canadians, we do not wave our flag. But I for one am proud of my country and its symbols. I applaud the Governor General for this change.

Manpower Training
Statements By Members

December 5th, 1995 / 2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Vaudreuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, the daily La Presse mentions that the Quebec government is prepared to launch formal discussions with Ottawa on the transfer of federal funds earmarked for manpower training. This is good news, particularly since the Quebec employment minister herself, Louise Harel, asked that a meeting be held as quickly as possible to discuss the issue.

This development seems very encouraging. I do hope that it reflects the will of the PQ government to finally recognize the choice made by Quebecers in the referendum, as well as its willingness to turn the page and co-operate with the federal government to promote Quebec's well-being and prosperity.

Provided these discussion are conducted in good faith and in good will, I am convinced that good things will result, both for the workers and the unemployed.

Bloc Quebecois
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Bonin Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, Quebec daily newspapers were reporting this morning that the next leader of the Bloc Quebecois will be an acting leader and that only the party's general council members will be voting in the election.

How do you like that, a leader who will be there only on a temporary basis, a leader selected by members of the party's establishment, who were themselves appointed by the retiring leader before he accedes to the throne in Quebec? As a result, party members who militated in good faith find themselves excluded from a process as fundamental as the selection of a new leader, with a leader who is leaving but at the same time wants to keep on controlling what happens in his Ottawa branch.

The Bloc Quebecois has not stood the test of time, and this prearranged exercise in democracy does not bode well for Quebec when the new king finally accedes to the throne.