House of Commons Hansard #181 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Reform

Val Meredith Surrey—White Rock—South Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are already concerned about high risk offenders walking the streets of their communities.

What assurances can the minister give Canadians that the government is taking steps to prevent innocent citizens from all high risk dangerous offenders, whether or not they are criminally insane?

Criminal Code
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I know of the hon. member's continuing concern in this area. I want to assure her that I share it and that steps are being taken.

We have already announced our intention to strengthen the existing dangerous offender provisions in the Criminal Code. Two weeks ago the Solicitor General announced the new flagging system to make it easier for prosecuting lawyers to have information about what people should be subject to such applications.

In addition we have announced our intention to introduce legislation to strengthen the dangerous offender provisions by removing the requirement for two psychiatric opinions before the court. We are also looking favourably at the recommenda-

tion from the federal-provincial-territorial task force to add long term offenders as a category to the code.

In May the Solicitor General and I will be convening a meeting of constitutional experts and others to look at other strategies we can take within the law to protect society from those who are at high risk of reoffending.

Information Highway
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Gordon Kirkby Prince Albert—Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, Canada's move toward a knowledge based economy presents tremendous economic and educational opportunities for all Canadians. It is very important that these opportunities are made available to all Canadians, not only those in urban areas but those in rural and remote areas as well.

Could the secretary of state tell the House what steps the government is taking to ensure that Canadians in rural and remote areas will have access to the opportunities afforded by the information highway?

Information Highway
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Portage—Interlake
Manitoba

Liberal

Jon Gerrard Secretary of State (Science

Mr. Speaker, as member for the rural riding of Portage-Interlake I share the hon. member's concern for rural areas and thank him for his question.

The government is working very hard through programs like SchoolNet, the community access centres and the senior centre information project to ensure the information highway gets out to all areas of Canada and that rural Canadians can benefit equally with urban Canadians.

The community access centres program is now being piloted. The first official competition will be due in October. We are working hard so that the program will be a success and will enable rural communities to participate. Members of Parliament will be fully briefed on the program before the summer break so they can help their communities in submitting briefs and empower people from one end of the country to the other to participate fully in the information highway.

Air Carriers
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transport.

The minister is always telling us about the progress he has made in the air transport industry and the satisfaction expressed by the presidents of the two main carriers. In fact, since his international route allocation policy was announced in late December, and because of his decisions systematically favouring Canadian International in the allocation of international routes, Air Canada shares are taking a beating on the stock market.

My question is this: How can the minister maintain that he acted fairly and equitably, when, according to Standard and Poor, Air Canada has been hurt by the minister's recent decisions giving Canadian International access to the American market, Chicago and New York in particular, without any compensation for Air Canada?

Air Carriers
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Acadie—Bathurst
New Brunswick

Liberal

Douglas Young Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, as you can appreciate, the financial situation of any company with publicly traded shares is a very delicate subject matter.

I must, however, tell my hon. colleague that the reason why I say that we have acted as equitably as possible in this whole matter is that, after years of controversy and difficulties in the Canadian air transport industry, the directors of both carriers are telling us and stating publicly that we have acted fairly and efficiently.

My hon. colleague should know, for example, that Air Canada decided the day before yesterday to proceed with a $500 million share issue and that, throughout this process, Air Canada notified Canadians that it had to purchase new planes and hire over 600 people. I think that, if we in the House of Commons want to be fair and equitable, we should realize that great progress has been made. The situation is not perfect, but we think that both carriers are about to experience years of growth that will be much more interesting than what we have seen in the past.

Air Carriers
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, how can the minister draw a parallel between Hong Kong, a route which Air Canada is ready to start servicing in the summer, thus creating 500 jobs, and Germany, a route which Canadian cannot even start servicing by the end of the year because it does not have enough planes?

Air Carriers
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Acadie—Bathurst
New Brunswick

Liberal

Douglas Young Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is very simple how we rationalize the decisions with respect to all our cross border and international air travel.

If I use the thesis put forward by my hon. friend, we would not have attributed all the rights we were able to negotiate with the United States. My hon. friend will know that Air Canada has orders with major aircraft manufacturers both in Canada and outside the country to be able to service the routes we have been able to negotiate internationally and with the United States.

If it were a question of only attributing routes or making it possible for Air Canada and Canadian to fly to areas where they have the aircraft for it, there would be a lot of things we would not do that we have already done.

We are saying to Air Canada and to Canadian Airlines International: "This is where you can go. This is how we arrived at the decision. This is how you can plan for your future". That is why they can go out now and negotiate for the purchase or the lease of aircraft to be able to fly to routes that were closed to both Air Canada and Canadian Airlines International in the United States and around the world.

If the hon. member were to be careful and understand what we have achieved for airports across the country and for employees of both airlines, he would tell us that by the end of 1995 we will have done more to improve the situation for both airlines than was done in the previous 15 or 20 years in the country.

Canada Post
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, it has recently come to our attention that the RCMP is investigating developer Jose Perez and his dealings with government officials.

I would like to have, if possible, the Solicitor General confirm or deny this report.

Canada Post
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it has never been customary in the House to confirm or deny RCMP investigations.

Canada Post
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, I will switch my tone then.

Let us talk about the Auditor General's report. On March 20 when I asked the minister a question he responded by quoting a special Auditor General's report. We found out that it had nothing to do with the question I asked. The dealings with Canada Post were not even mentioned.

Why would the minister of public works quote from that report because it has nothing to do with the matter?

Canada Post
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, aside from the fact that it is not a supplementary to the member's first question, I want to say that I will be happy to inform myself further about what the report says or does not say, and then I will get back to the hon. member.

Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Simon de Jong Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the minister of immigration.

The question concerns refugees who do not intend to buy 40-inch TV sets as their second or third purchase in Canada.

As the minister is aware no other country in the world charges a fee of $975 for refugees. He has assured us, however, that loans will be available to refugees from poorer countries who cannot afford the $975 fee. There is a catch-22 however.

My question is for the minister of immigration. Will he deny entry to those immigrants and refugees who do not meet the criteria to repay the loan? Will he assure us that no refugee will be denied entrance into Canada even though they cannot pay the $975 fee and do not meet the criteria for qualifying to receive a loan?

Immigration
Oral Questions

Noon

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, it is not true that other countries do not charge various processing fees. We have decided to charge a landing fee, not a refugee fee, for accessing our system for two reasons. The first is so all newcomers to the country can join other Canadians in all walks of life in ensuring the prosperity of Canada into the future.

The second reason we are charging a landing fee is to ensure the settlement services will continue. It is the people who the member talks about that are in need of the settlement services the most. If we were not going to go the route of the fee, my impression would be that settlement would become a thing of the past. Therefore, we are doing it with the intention of helping the neediest coming into our country.

On top of that, the Minister of Finance has instituted a loan program so they can take out a loan and repay the $975 to ensure their future in the best country of the world, just like kids of Canadian parents ask for loans of tens of thousands of dollars for education so that they too can ensure their future.

Taxation
Oral Questions

March 31st, 1995 / noon

Liberal

Beth Phinney Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice.

It is nearly a year since the Supreme Court ruled on the Suzanne Thibaudeau case on taxation of child support payments. At that time the government promised action on the level, enforcement and taxation of child support payments.

Can the minister tell the House why no action has been taken to make sure Canadian children get the support they need and deserve?