House of Commons Hansard #181 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Infrastructure
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

John O'Reilly Victoria—Haliburton, ON

Mr. Speaker, recently I had the opportunity to participate in an infrastructure event in my riding of Victoria-Haliburton. Announced were eight projects valued at $1.1 million for the Victoria County Board of Education, including the installation of computer wiring to give students better access to the information highway.

There have been 153 infrastructure programs announced in my riding in places like Fenelon Falls, Haliburton, Kinmount, Minden, Bobcaygeon, Kirkfield, Apsley in Brock township and my home town of Lindsay. They have totalled over $25 million and created thousands of part time and permanent jobs.

The Canadian infrastructure program is an investment in the future. It has improved communities. It has upgraded the quality of life across the country. Most important, it has invested in the education system for our future. It is a success.

Turkey
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Turkish offensive against the Kurds continues to cause many casualties. Today, 23 more Kurds were killed in Southeastern Turkey.

While Turkey continues to violate the most elementary rules of international law, Canada turns a blind eye. Even worse, although Germany has suspended deliveries of all military equipment to Turkey, the Canadian government has started negotiations with Turkey on the sale of its CF-5 fighter planes.

This is one more indication that the Liberal government's foreign policy is totally inconsistent.

The government must stop hiding its head in the sand and condemn forthwith the unacceptable behaviour of one of Canada's military allies by bringing this difficult matter before NATO and the UN Security Council.

Constituency Committees
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate a group of constituents in my riding of Nanaimo-Cowichan who are doing valuable work on behalf of taxpayers.

Several months ago I followed the lead of my colleague from North Vancouver by inviting interested citizens to get involved in the Canada Employment Centre grant process. Since that time this committee has been hard at work reviewing grants to determine if tax dollars were being spent wisely. This practice has resulted in constituents having direct input into the process instead of having the MP simply rubber stamp these applications, as is usually the case according to a senior official at human resources development.

Based on the positive results from this committee, I am now looking to establish other working groups at the constituency level to get involved in everything from agriculture to transportation.

This committee and others like it should serve as an example to all MPs as to the value of getting constituents involved in the democratic process.

Health Care
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

NDP

Len Taylor The Battlefords—Meadow Lake, SK

Mr. Speaker, the financing of medical care in Canada has become a challenging task that the federal government is about to make even more challenging. The current federal proposal to change the way cash is transferred to the provinces will create a patchwork of different delivery systems in different provinces across Canada. Fortunately, some provinces have a progressive view of health care delivery.

Thanks to good economic management, the Government of Saskatchewan will introduce this year new and expanded health services at the community level. These will include home care and increased support for respite beds, and day programs that provide some relief for family caregivers when needed.

Saskatchewan's health minister, Lorne Calvert, says that these and other initiatives represent the most comprehensive and people sensitive approach to community based health care in Canada.

It shows that even in the face of financial difficulties a province that cares for people can meet its health challenges. I urge the federal government to ensure provincial initiatives such as these are not undermined by a shortsighted and poor-

Health Care
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for St. Boniface.

Learning Disabilities
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel St. Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, you may have noticed a number of our colleagues wearing a black and gold ribbon over the past month. March is Learning Disabilities Month and this ribbon honours all Canadians who have learning disabilities and those who provide them with support of all kinds.

One Canadian out of ten, which means 2.9 million Canadians, has learning disabilities, which will affect performance at school and may be a serious obstacle to learning to read, write and do arithmetic.

Early diagnosis and remedial intervention is the key. Children with learning disabilities become adults with learning disabilities if there is no early intervention.

As a former educator, I recognize the importance of training for all teachers in learning disabilities and the importance of specialized training programs for adults with learning disabilities.

Today I honour and recognize the learning disabled, each of whom struggles daily to learn. I also honour those who provide them with support of all types.

Canadian Wheat Board
Statements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, Canadian farmers are no strangers to the hardships of climactic extremes. As our economic climate becomes increasingly competitive, farmers are confronting a growing storm of cutbacks and continuing trade wars, especially downward pressure from the American export enhancement program.

At the eye of the storm is the Canadian Wheat Board, one of Canada's great institutions. In such a climate the board plays a critical role by supporting the principles of orderly and fair marketing and in essence works on behalf of farmers.

I have received copies of several hundred letters written by Canadians from ridings across western Canada who feel the same way. All of these letters say the board should remain a strong selling agency for the Canadian farmer. Many suggest it should be given an even stronger mandate.

In the truest sense, the Canadian Wheat Board is an organization that works for Canadian farmers. I congratulate those farmers and support their initiative.

Youth Service Canada
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Walt Lastewka St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to update the House on a successful Youth Service Canada project conducted by the Institute for Enterprise Education in St. Catharines.

The program provided training and practical experience with local business people in entrepreneurial, interpersonal and labour market skills. It paved the way for a successful school to work transition.

With 19 full term students, seven have secured employment within their career path objectives working with other entrepreneurs. Nine have already begun business operations and three are finalizing their business plans and proceeding with their business start-ups.

I have worked with the youth enterprise program from start to graduation. I am very pleased with the accomplishments of the students.

We can all celebrate the successful program sponsored by Human Resources Development Canada. I also congratulate the Secretary of State for Training and Youth for working with our youth and making this program such a success.

Canadian National
Statements By Members

March 31st, 1995 / 11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, as the official opposition pointed out during the debate on back-to-work legislation for railway employees, the Minister of Transport waited until the government had wielded its big stick before starting the process of privatizing Canadian National.

The Minister of Transport, who openly sided with the employers and against the employees in the railway dispute, was anxious to downgrade the terms and conditions of employment at CN so it would be easier to privatize the company.

The minister did not even have the decency to wait and started his privatization process less than a week after the passage of back-to-work legislation. Now more than ever before, it is clear to railway employees, and Canadians generally, that the arbitration process put in place by the Minister of Labour in the railway sector is biased towards the employer. The opposition was right to condemn this bill.

Justice
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday an Ontario court justice made a ruling that could very well affect the safety of all Canadians.

Justice Peter Howden ruled that a section of the Criminal Code clearly violates the rights of a criminally insane person because the role and powers of the federal Criminal Code Review Board are too broad and do not have clear standards.

This case centres around a criminally insane person who has been convicted of criminal charges on four separate occasions, including the beating of his aunt with a rolling pin. However, this is only the start, as 1,100 similar people being held on warrants wait for lawyers to find loopholes in the criminal justice system.

The minister has been asked by the Ontario court to step in and make changes to the code so that such a judgment would not take place. The minister hesitated in dealing with the Supreme Court decision in the Daviault case and we all know what followed.

The minister now has a chance to redeem himself. Canadians do not want a second blown opportunity. They want reassurance of a safe community and reassurance that dangerous offenders will remain in custody.

Susan Aglukark
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Jack Iyerak Anawak Nunatsiaq, NT

[Editor's Note: Member spoke in Inuktitut.]

On Sunday the Juno Awards for Canadian music excellence were handed out. Among the winners was a young Inuk from my constituency, Susan Aglukark. Susan received two Junos, one for best new solo artist and one for best music of aboriginal Canadian recording.

These Juno Awards are in addition to the rising star trophy she received at last year's Country Music Awards and her 1994 National Aboriginal Achievement Award.

It is fitting that Susan should receive these Junos this month as March is Aboriginal Language Month. An Inuk from Arviat, Northwest Territories, Susan is proud to sing in her native language, Inuktitut, as well as in English. Her newly released album "This Child" is meeting with great success. Her music touches the hearts of many.

Congratulations, Susan.

The Late Donald Morrow
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a man who served his community, his province and his country with distinction.

Don Morrow died in Ottawa on Wednesday at the age of 86. He represented the people of Ottawa West in the provincial legislature for 29 years, from 1948 to 1977, and served as the Speaker of the Ontario legislature.

Don Morrow had been out of office for nearly 20 years. However, his service to his community and his links with its people were so strong that when Don Morrow walked into a room or down a street, he was greeted with warmth, affection and remembrance.

I think that is what we would all like to have at the end of our careers.

I say thank you to his family for the time they allowed him to give to all of us, and I offer our condolences on his passing.

Human Values
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau—La Lièvre, QC

Mr. Speaker, the regional commissions have finished their work in Quebec and have submitted their recommendations to the national commission. Unfortunately, some remarkable facts came out of all this which were not reported by the media. Many people set aside the constitutional and political option to discuss a blueprint for society, a society based on human values and social measures that enrich all members of society and reflect the philosophy that we are our brother's keeper.

They rejected out of hand a number of corporate values, including those of multinationals who want no government intervention, and free trade where the profit motive is king and one must be competitive at any cost.

I am convinced the same exercise would produce the same results across Canada, in other words, all Canadians want to live in a country where human values come first, and the economy must serve the people, not the other way around.

Canadian Armed Forces
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Philippe Paré Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, after strangely downplaying the importance of the increased number of suicides in the Canadian armed forces, and, in particular, among the military returning from peacekeeping missions, the Minister of Defence finally agreed yesterday to look into these tragic incidents.

The situation is very distressing. Why are members of the military more inclined to use external rather than internal resources to overcome the difficulties they face in adjusting on their return?

The official opposition wants answers to these troubling questions. It calls on the government to act quickly in this matter and make public the results of the Minister of Defence's internal inquiry.

National Defence
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, five Airbuses purchased by the Department of National Defence at a cost of $250 million three years ago have spent 11 months of the year on the ground.

National defence's spending $250 million taxpayer dollars for planes to sit on the ground for 11 months of the year is beyond comprehension. All the while we are spending another $45 million per year just to move our troops around the country. What is going on?

While it has been clear that the defence minister has many troubles in his department, this simply cannot go on. These planes and all the money we have been spending is not in the best interests of our troops and not in the best interests of taxpayers.

So my message is, stop the waste and spend the money on better equipment for our troops who work so hard and make Canadians proud.