House of Commons Hansard #202 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dairy.

Topics

Professional Women's Network
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, in Etobicoke-Lakeshore many women from diverse business backgrounds have come together to establish a network to help women in business.

The Professional Women's Network will provide a much needed forum for local business development and for the needs of professional and business women. These women representing a broad representation of professions will meet regularly to exchange ideas, share information, and work together to create opportunities for each other and for our community.

The growing prominence of women in professions and other sectors has proven to be a major factor in Canada's future growth, and the Professional Women's Network in Etobicoke-Lakeshore is testament to that fact.

The Liberal government recognizes the women of Canada have the imagination and determination to participate fully in the growing world economy. I support, commend and encourage the ingenuity of these and all women across Canada.

Ontario Election
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Brent St. Denis Algoma, ON

Mr. Speaker, as we all know, Ontario voters will soon elect a new provincial government. By most accounts it will be a Lyn McLeod led Liberal government. I say it is about time.

Soon after the campaign started the Lyn McLeod Liberals released their plan to get Ontario back on track. York University economist Fred Lazar said:

I have had a chance to review the assumptions and the numbers in the Liberal balanced budget plan. This plan to balance Ontario's budget in four years while providing stable multi-year funding to the transfer partners in health, education and the municipalities is a realistic doable approach to re-establishing fiscal responsibility in Ontario. A balanced budget is key to creating a healthy economic climate that will in turn stimulate investment and bring jobs to Ontario.

Only a plan that aims to balance a budget within the term of a government can be considered to be a balanced budget plan.

Ontario needs a new provincial government; it needs a Liberal government led by Lyn McLeod.

Human Rights
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Nic Leblanc Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has announced that Canada is preparing to start trading with certain countries regardless of their human rights violations. According to the Prime Minister and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the liberalization of trade is the best means of promoting the respect of human rights.

These words will be of no comfort to those on death row in Indonesia, China, Saudi Arabia, Burma and Iraq. The most ironic thing about the whole situation is that the Liberal government, with the Prime Minister showing the way, is so happy with this development that it is actually bragging about it. Money has no smell. As for the Liberal government, it has no scruples. It has traded them in for several million greenbacks.

Human Resources Development
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Human Resources Development cannot even get a piece of legislation past his own cabinet colleagues.

Every day another article appears stating that the grand schemes proposed by the minister last year have been scrapped. His own discussion papers on unemployment insurance state that 26 per cent of UI claimants have filed four or more claims in the last five years. First he says this is a serious problem that needs to be addressed, and now he is saying it is not a problem and does not need to be addressed. The minister just cannot seem to make up his mind.

Today the minister is reported to have said that the social reform proposals have had to take a backseat to cutting the federal deficit. Reducing the number of repeat users of unemployment insurance would help cut the federal deficit, and still he will not implement the needed reforms.

If the minister cannot make the tough decisions, he should turn the administration of UI over to the workers and the employers who pay the premiums. The minister flails and fails again.

World Kite Festival
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Lavigne Verdun—Saint-Paul, QC

Mr. Speaker, when I think of kites, I think of the sheets of newspaper which children used to glue to slats of wood and then try to send up into the sky. Recently, my eyes, and those of hundreds of thousands of other people, were opened.

In 1993, the municipality of Verdun inaugurated the world kite festival. Since then, some 20 countries have begun coming to the event in Verdun to compete and to show off their talent. Each year during the festival, the sky is filled with kites of all colours and of all imaginable forms. Last year, the festival won Quebec's award for tourism-the Meritas prize.

I invite all of you, and your families, to come to the world kite festival which will be held in my beautiful riding of Verdun-Saint-Paul from June 1 to June 4. We promise you a good time and a show that you will not easily forget.

Quebec Finance Minister's Budget
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, with or without sovereignty, taxes will go up next year, said Jean Campeau, according to today's headline in La Presse.

Quebecers do not want taxes to go up, no matter who collects them. They want a responsible finance minister, someone who, like his federal counterpart and those in several provinces across Canada, works hard to reduce spending and the deficit without raising taxes.

The Canadian government has reviewed all government programs and proposed measures to reduce spending and the deficit. Its approach was logical, involving a great deal of consultation and skill and none of this rushing around to close down hospitals, for instance.

Quebec's budget is important to all Quebecers. The Government of Quebec should be less independent and listen to Quebecers.

Niagara District Airport
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Walt Lastewka St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, two weeks ago the member of Parliament for Niagara Falls and I attended a ceremony initiating the transfer of the Niagara District Airport from the federal government to local authorities.

Local authorities in St. Catharines, Thorold, Niagara Falls and Niagara-on-the-Lake have been working together toward the transfer for quite some time. The national airports policy announced by the transport minister last summer provided a perfect opportunity to make the transfer a reality.

Local control of the airport will provide a more hands on approach where local stakeholders can be directly involved in airport responsibilities. The transfer will enable the airport to run in a cost effective and competitive manner and be better equipped to respond quickly to local commercial opportunities.

We thank the Minister of Transport and his officials for a smooth transition.

Aboriginal Rights
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister of Indian affairs will soon table a policy on inherent right to self-government. This is a significant departure from past government policies.

Despite red book promises to consult with aboriginal peoples on the inherent rights policy, we now see Indian and Metis

leaders demanding that the minister go public with his document. I agree. All Canadians have a right to know what the minister is contemplating. This will affect future political relations between aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadians forever.

The Minister of Justice has shown he does not understand what consultation means with his gun bill. Now we hear that the minister of Indian affairs is imitating his colleague and has a secret draft policy that may also have considerable constitutional ramifications. Native leaders do not think they have been adequately consulted, let alone the rest of the Canadian people.

While meeting the needs of aboriginal communities I believe any inherent rights policy must respect the principle of equality for all Canadians.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

May 16th, 1995 / 2:15 p.m.

Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Bloc

Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, at a meeting with his Quebec counterpart who came to Ottawa with three bills for a total amount of $333 million, the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs once again refused to meet his financial commitments. The minister even told Quebec, in no uncertain terms, to take the matter to court.

My question is directed to the Prime Minister. Are we to understand from the arrogant reply of his intergovernmental affairs minister that this is the new flexible federalism: asking Quebec to sue for payment of accounts in arrears?

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I think the reply the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs gave yesterday was quite satisfactory. One aspect of the problem is being checked by the auditor general. Another aspect is being checked again. If there were any mistakes, we can correct them, but for the time being, we have no information to that effect.

As for the third matter, when determining payments to the provinces, the Minister of Finance does this according to formulas that are in the legislation. There is no flexibility, and if someone thinks the law was not interpreted as it should be, then that person should, and there are precedents for this, ask the courts to intervene.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Bloc

Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, this is the same kind of answer we got for months to requests for reimbursement of referendum costs.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Exactly the same.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Lucien Bouchard Lac-Saint-Jean, QC

Ottawa has been particularly stubborn in the case of the cost of educating young aboriginal people, which amounted to $119 million, payment of which has been outstanding for eight years. As you know, this amount is payable under the James Bay Agreement signed by Ottawa in 1968.

I want to ask the Prime Minister to explain why, considering these delays and dilatory measures, the only offer he will let his minister make to his Quebec counterpart is to appoint a new committee of officials that will conduct more meetings.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, the James Bay Agreement contains a section indicating the province and the federal government must agree on budgets and their content.

In this case, the Province of Quebec refused to fulfil its part of the agreement. It did not give the federal government a chance to check assets and the number of non-natives among the student population. Consequently, we had no way of knowing what the federal government's share actually was.

During that time we paid $464 million for aboriginal education. During that time, and in fact quite recently, we offered to review the matter with the Quebec government in an attempt to clear up this problem, and the ball is now in the court of the Parti Quebecois.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Bloc

Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if the minister wanted to know more about the case, he could talk to his colleague, the Minister of Labour, who used to be the Minister of Education responsible for this matter in Quebec City and as such filed claims that have gone unpaid for years.