House of Commons Hansard #25 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was police.

Topics

Justice
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice.

Why is it that our courts do not accept the devastating and traumatic impact of sexual assault and rape on the lives of young victims?

Our Ontario community is outraged that such crimes can be treated so leniently, as in the sentence in the recent Stuckless case where he received two years for multiple child assaults.

How can such lightweight sentencing possibly protect our young and provide deterrence and how will the Minister of Justice fix this shortcoming in our sentencing system?

Justice
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Ahuntsic
Québec

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I, along with all members of this House, I am sure, would like to extend my sympathies to the family and friends of Martin Kruze. He led a very difficult life and he was a very brave man to bring forth this issue.

At the moment the indictable offence of sexual assault has a maximum sentence of 10 years and one of aggravated assault has a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

It is not the laws. The laws are there. It is the application of the laws.

This matter is also the subject of an appeal at the moment.

Cida
Oral Question Period

October 31st, 1997 / 11:40 a.m.

Reform

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, accountability and transparency are lacking in CIDA's policies and performance.

In 1994 CIDA recommended that an aid effectiveness advisory committee with members from inside and outside CIDA be set up. That was over three years ago.

Can the government tell us why this committee has not been established and how long this party will continue to take political advantage of CIDA?

Cida
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Moncton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Claudette Bradshaw Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I will take the question under advisement, I will inform the minister of it, and we will ensure that the question is answered.

Cida
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians want accountability within the system. The Canadian auditor general's office has trained over 120 auditors from 45 countries. CIDA has never used them except once and it exposed that the money was not used for the intended purpose.

Could the minister tell Canadians why those auditors are not being used by CIDA?

Cida
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Moncton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Claudette Bradshaw Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I assure the member that as soon as the minister is back on Monday morning we will have an answer for him.

Seniors Benefits
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Human Resources Development.

The Canada pension plan is one important component of retirement income. Others are the old age pension and the GIS. They are both tied together and they are both scheduled for change.

In light of that, why has the government not tabled legislation on the seniors benefit which will replace the old age pension so that in fairness Canadians and Parliament can deal with the whole package at the same time? Or, is the minister simply saying to us that when seniors return from his house this Hallowe'en night they had better check their apples for razor blades?

Seniors Benefits
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I thought the question was directed to my colleague in the finance department.

Before the finance committee the other day we had a long discussion on the merits of CPP reform. We were looking into a number of aspects. I think we are doing very well.

Seniors Benefits
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, that was the weakest answer I have heard in this Parliament.

When will the government table legislation on the seniors benefit so we can deal with the whole package? The seniors benefit and the CPP are interlinked. The CPP provides about 25% of retirement income and is based on a universal old age pension.

The government wants to continue to try to abolish the universal old age pension. Is it afraid to table legislation because it is under pressure from senior citizens?

Seniors Benefits
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

It is absolutely to the contrary, Mr. Speaker. We are very pleased with the package we have been able to introduce because it will bring a benefit to 75% of seniors. Ninety per cent of single senior women will benefit under the package. It is one we are proud of. It is one that is sustainable.

We feel it is a fair package. We are looking forward to bringing forth legislation in a timely manner so that all Canadians can come to the same conclusion we have adopted.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government has allowed an interception salmon fishery on the east and the west coasts of Canada. We are now facing an immediate stock crisis on both coasts. At this time of crisis why is the government following through with a divestiture of the Nova Scotian salmon hatcheries?

These hatcheries support Nova Scotian salmon threatened by the very interception fishery the government allows.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, it has been well known for some time that the Government of Canada would divest the fish hatcheries. We have done that after talking with the fishing communities.

In most cases fish hatcheries have been sustained by developing a partnership in some cases with provincial government and in some cases with fishery associations.

We are looking to the future in terms of continuing to utilize hatcheries and keep them operating through those kinds of partnership agreements.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, because of acid rain many of the salmon rivers in southwestern Nova Scotia no longer support a run of multi-sea winter salmon in Nova Scotia.

The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans has said many times in the House that his department is responsible for conservation. Is the Department of Fisheries and Oceans now denying that responsibility?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as the government has moved forward in terms of getting its financial books in order we have had to make cutbacks in certain areas.

Conservation does remain a priority of the federal government in terms of the fishery. We have been able to do things in a fiscally responsible manner, maintain conservation and ensure that the hatcheries are there for the future because of the arrangements we have been able to work out.

Cida
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Bill Graham Toronto Centre—Rosedale, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for to the parliamentary secretary to the minister responsible for CIDA.

Despite international humanitarian aid to North Korea, the North Korean people are starving under the world's most repressive regime.

Canadians want to know what the situation is in North Korea and what steps Canada is taking to provide aid in keeping with its tradition as a key supplier of humanitarian food aid.