House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was women.

Topics

Employment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

St. Paul's
Ontario

Liberal

Barry Campbell Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian people know which side of the House is talking and which side of the House is acting.

On the question of the CPP contribution increase, it is somewhat irresponsible of the hon. member opposite to talk about something as a job killer when it is an investment in the public pension plan shared risk that all of us share to ensure a decent retirement, a foundation for retirement. It is contributions toward a fund that is invested for the benefit of the workers, the present retirees, the future retirees. It is something that we will continue to support and make sure is viable and sustainable.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Solicitor General.

On October 4, 1995, the Minister of Justice and the Solicitor General gave Judge Lynn Ratushny the task of examining the files of the various women who were sentenced for killing their abusive partner. The judge has just released her findings and concludes that four women should be freed, one should be given a lighter sentence and another should be given a new hearing before the court of appeal.

When does the minister intend to implement the judge's recommendations?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we have received Judge Ratushny's preliminary report. It is being studied by a working group of officials in the Department of Justice and the Department of the Solicitor General. They are also consulting with the provincial attorneys general.

Because this matter raises some rather novel juridical concepts we have to proceed with all due deliberate speed. I look forward to having a response from the Minister of Justice and myself before too long.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is perhaps important for the Solicitor General to take his time. This is a report he himself requested with his colleague in Justice.

I would like to know at what point the women prisoners are likely to get out of prison, because you are going to act on the recommendations. How long will it take to examine the files? How long should these women expect to wait: a week, two weeks, six months? What hope are you giving them?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have great respect for Judge Ratushny's work. I think she would be the last person to say that her report should be simply treated as something with a rubber stamp.

Instead, what is involved in her report is something quite novel and that is applying a ruling of a court to a trial in a decision of another court that took place quite a while before the judgment that has led to the study by Judge Ratushny.

Under the circumstances, when we are talking about either asking for a new trial under section 690 of the code or using the royal prerogative of mercy, certainly we have to think carefully about the implications for the justice system. We also, in that connection, have to take into account the views of our provincial counterparts.

We want to proceed with all due deliberate speed but we want to do it in the right way.

Hospital Closures
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, this week I had occasion to visit two of the Ottawa hospitals that are slated to close, the Montfort and the Riverside.

In the case of the Riverside, it is closing because the Liberal government chose to give its entire budget, $97 million, to a corporate buddy, Bombardier. How can the government possibly justify its choice of corporation subsidies over Canadian hospitals?

Hospital Closures
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member opposite continues to make reference to the situation in the province of Ontario with regard to the decisions that the Ontario government and Premier Harris have made.

I wish to quote for the hon. member a statement by the Minister of Finance on March 6, 1997:

In other words, he should understand that if hospitals are being closed in Ontario it is as a result of a political choice. Tax cuts are being made. I will not dispute them, but they are not the result of a reduction in transfers from the government.

Hospital Closures
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, maybe the health minister could then explain how Harris has cut the hospital beds in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and Alberta?

These cuts are the direct responsibility of the Liberal government. Maybe the health minister should listen to what Dr. Tony Wade, president of the New Brunswick Medical Society, thinks about the Liberal's attack on health care. He stated: "I don't need a dictionary to know that they spell abandonment".

Can the health minister tell Dr. Wade of New Brunswick why the Prison Art Foundation gets $100,000 that should go to the hospitals in New Brunswick? Explain that.

Hospital Closures
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, again I thank the hon. member for the lob ball question.

The hon. member should be aware of the situation in the great province of Alberta. I wish to quote again the federal Minister of Finance who said on March 6:

At the same time the province of Alberta is declaring surpluses and cutting taxes. He cannot say that it is reductions in federal transfers when Alberta is cutting taxes and declaring surpluses.

And at the same time it is closing down hospitals.

Breast Cancer
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

My question is for the Minister of Health.

The red book states on page 81, and I quote: "It is well known, for example, that research into breast cancer, which afflicts one woman in nine, has been seriously underfunded." As a result of the parliamentary report on breast cancer, the Conservative government had committed significant investments for research on this issue, but the program is coming to an end in 1998.

On the eve of International Women's Day, is the Liberal government able to tell us that it intends to renew for another five years its commitment to research on breast cancer in Canada, as did the Canadian Cancer Institute and the Canadian Cancer Society?

Breast Cancer
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for the question because it is substantive and important to women all across the country.

Earlier this week I met with a number of representatives from the Canadian foundation, the breast network association across the country, as well as other representatives to discuss with them their proposals and ways in which to work together in order to continue financing this initiative.

We have also contributed $2.7 million over five years to the breast cancer information exchange pilot projects. The hon. member is aware that Canada and the United States had the first ever women's health forum whereby one of the clear priorities of Canada and the United States is to focus research on breast cancer.

I assure the hon. member that this a serious issue and that we are taking it very seriously.

Breast Cancer
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, this evaluation report states that research is often disconnected from reality and recommends that women who have survived breast cancer play a more active role in research.

Does the Minister of Health intend to follow through with this recommendation by modifying the research funding criteria?

Breast Cancer
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that point is very substantive and has been made to me. It deserves very serious consideration.

I have asked my officials as well as the various funding bodies to examine that to accommodate what I believe is a very legitimate request made by the hon. member and by other members as well.

Health Care
Oral Questions

March 7th, 1997 / 11:40 a.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Reform Party is committed to publicly funded health care in Canada.

I will speak very slowly so that the Minister of Health and members on the other side will understand real life examples of my experience in the emergency department.

A young woman came in needing urgent dialysis. She could not get it because the hospital has had its funds cut. She went into cardiac arrest after three days and almost died. On an average night 8 out of 13 hospital bays are filled with patients. There is no room in the hospital and the hospital does not have any money.

Is the minister's version of better health care management to give $97 million to Bombardier or to give money to health care so that Canadians can get urgent treatment when they medically need it?

Health Care
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I do not think any member on this side of the House would want to debate or argue the sincerity of the hon. member opposite, particularly in relation to his preamble.

In Hansard in 1995 he said the following:

Let us allow the provinces to experiment with alternative funding models such as private clinics, private insurance and the like.

I know the hon. member is doing flip flops, huffing and puffing, but I suggest that he, his friend from Macleod and the leader of the Reform Party get their acts together and come to the floor of the House of Commons with a reasoned, well thought out health policy.