House of Commons Hansard #153 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was income.

Topics

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 10 petitions.

Interparliamentary Delegation
Routine Proceedings

April 10th, 1997 / 10 a.m.

Pierrefonds—Dollard
Québec

Liberal

Bernard Patry Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the reports of the Canadian section of the Assemblée internationale des parlementaires de langue française as well as the financial report concerning the meetings of the Assemblée's Commission politique et de l'administration générale and its executive in Beirut, Lebanon, on November 20 and 21, 1996.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations dealing with government contracting.

In response to concerns expressed by representatives from the public and private sectors, our committee sought to ensure more effective parliamentary oversight of government contracting, particularly with regard to the open bidding service. We have made a number of recommendations with a view toward making the contracting process more transparent, accessible and competitive, thus ensuring more effective management of the process by the government itself.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, we are requesting a comprehensive government response.

Dna Identification Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-94, an act respecting DNA identification and to make consequential amendments to the Criminal Code and other acts.

Mr. Speaker, as it is customary for the mover of the motion to say a brief word about the purpose of the bill, I want to say that this bill proposes the establishment of a national DNA databank. This is the second phase of our strategy to enable DNA evidence to be used in solving crimes. The first step was the legislation to enable DNA samples to be taken by warrant, which was passed a year ago.

I am very pleased to continue our commitment and to table legislation to carry out the second phase of the creation of a DNA databank.

Finally, I wish to inform the House that I propose to move that this bill be referred to committee before second reading, pursuant to Standing Order 73(1).

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Bank Act
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

David Iftody Provencher, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-398, an act to amend the Bank Act (amalgamation).

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to rise in the House today to present my first private member's bill, an act to amend the Bank Act respecting amalgamation.

This bill addresses recent proposals by a number of Canadian large banks and financial institutions to merge with smaller institutions in Canada.

The primary substance of the bill is to prohibit that process only in limited circumstances, for example where one of the institutions

under the advisement of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions could demonstrate insolvency.

The health of the Canadian financial sector would not be served by these kinds of amalgamations. Most Canadians feel very uncomfortable with some of the banks, particularly at this time, amalgamating even more power. With the help of my colleague, the hon. member for Trinity-Spadina, we propose to table this today.

We believe it will contribute in a very substantial way to the ongoing debate in financial institutions in Canada.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Firearms Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-399, an act to repeal the Firearms Act and to make certain amendments to the Criminal Code.

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure today to table my new private member's bill which would repeal Bill C-68, a gun control bill masquerading as a crime control bill, which imposes an unfair and unjust requirement for law-abiding owners of rifles and shotguns to pay new fees and register their legal firearms while it does nothing to punish the criminal misuse of firearms.

My new private member's bill will restore the Criminal Code as it was before the introduction of Bill C-68 and replace Bill C-68 with serious minimum penalties for the criminal misuse of firearms.

My bill will amend the Criminal Code to require a minimum sentence of five years for using a firearm to commit a crime or to escape from a crime scene, that penalty increased to ten years if the gun is fired. People convicted of such criminal misuse of firearms would receive a lifetime prohibition against owning a firearm, ammunition or an explosive device.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canada Elections Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-400, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (registration of political parties).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce a bill entitled an act to amend the Canada Elections Act. The intention of this bill is threefold. First, the bill amends the Canada Elections Act to allow registration of a political party by the Chief Electoral Officer when the party nominates candidates in at least 12 electoral districts throughout the country, down from the present requirement of 50 electoral districts.

Under the present act, the Chief Electoral Officer must deregister a party that does not meet the conditions set out in section 28(2) of the act.

Second, the bill removes the obligation placed on the chief agent of a political party to liquidate the assets of that party when it is deleted from the registry of political parties by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada.

Finally, the bill lowers the amount required for deposit with the returning officer at the same time the nomination papers are filed.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Fredericton—York—Sunbury, NB

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure, pursuant to Standing Order 36, to table five petitions signed by some 600 constituents of Fredericton-York-Sunbury calling on Parliament to legalize cannabis.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have several petitions, the first containing 162 names. It calls on Parliament to enact legislation that will register all pedophiles.

The second petition is a similar type of request. The petitioners call on Parliament to eliminate the right of convicted pedophiles to be let out of jail on bail pending an appeal. This would ensure the protection and safety of the victims and the community from such convicted offenders. There are 165 names on this petition.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to present a petition from my constituents. They bring to the attention of the House that they believe the provocation defence, as it is currently used in wife slaughter cases inappropriately and unjustly changes the focus of the criminal trial from the behaviour of the accused's intention to murder to the behaviour of the victim who from then on is identified as the one responsible for the accused's violence.

My constituents do not believe that any amount of provocation should excuse the act of murder. Therefore, the petitioners request that Parliament review and change the relevant provisions of the Criminal Code to ensure that men take responsibility for their violent behaviour.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Joe McGuire Egmont, PE

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to present a petition on behalf of the constituents of Egmont.

The petition states that because there are over 30,000 nuclear weapons on earth, the petitioners pray and request that Parliament support the immediate initiative and conclusion by the year 2000 of an international convention which will set out a binding timetable for the abolition of all nuclear weapons.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is my honour to present three petitions. The first petition begs the Government of Canada to upgrade its highway system and spend more money on the repair and maintenance of highways.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition states that children have a moral right to be loved and nurtured by both parents and by members of both extended families.

Consequently, the relevant and legal rights and obligations should be fundamentally the same for both parents before and after separation or divorce.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, the third petition follows the one presented by my colleague from Athabasca. It has to do with the murder of a woman by her husband and then allowing the husband who committed the act to claim provocation. This is patently unjust. It does not make sense. It speaks against the notion of fairness.

This petition, signed by over 300 residents primarily of my constituency, asks that the government review and change that law so that persons who attack and kill their spouses are not able to claim provocation as a justified defence.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Gar Knutson Elgin—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have five petitions. The first petition has been signed by 26 people. It calls on Parliament to support unequivocally the enlargement of NATO to include all countries of central and eastern Europe that wish to join, excluding none a priori.