House of Commons Hansard #153 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Income Tax Budget Amendments Act, 1996
Routine Proceedings

1:50 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

I declare the motion carried. Accordingly, the bill is referred to the Standing Committee on Finance.

(Motion agreed to, and bill referred to a committee.)

On the Order: Government Orders:

April 9, 1997-The Minister of Finance-Second reading and referrence to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-93, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 18, 1997.

Budget Implementation Act, 1997
Routine Proceedings

1:55 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

moved that Bill C-93, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 18, 1997, be referred forthwith to the Standing Committee on Finance.

Budget Implementation Act, 1997
Routine Proceedings

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Kilger Stormont—Dundas, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if there might be a disposition either to suspend the House or to see the clock as being two o'clock and we could go to Statements by Members in order for the member to have his full ten minutes following question period.

Budget Implementation Act, 1997
Routine Proceedings

1:55 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Is that agreed?

Budget Implementation Act, 1997
Routine Proceedings

1:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Potash
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Bernie Collins Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, 1996 marked the third consecutive outstanding year for the Saskatchewan potash industry, the largest producer and exporter of potash in the world.

The industry's solid performance in 1996 was the result of strong sales to the United States, Brazil, western Europe and Indonesia. These sales, combined with strong potash prices, sustained gross revenue to the Saskatchewan industry at the second highest level on record.

Most important, this success translates into high quality, well paying jobs. The potash industry employs 3,000 people in Saskatchewan and has an annual capital spending of $60 million.

In order to build on this success and to spur growth in the mining industry as a whole, I call on all members to support the natural resources minister in her efforts to remove regulatory constraints within federal jurisdiction which hinder mining investment in Canada.

Asbestos
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Guy Chrétien Frontenac, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to acknowledge in this House the courage and determination of the four miners from Asbestos who ran in the Paris marathon last weekend.

In so doing, although they were ignored by the French press, they wanted to create awareness about how safe asbestos really is when used properly. These four miners have demonstrated that the physical ability of workers is in no way affected by exposure to chrysotile asbestos fibres, partly because of the very high health standards in the industry.

I salute their action and encourage any such activity aimed at convincing the French people that this matter was blown out of proportion.

My colleague from Richmond-Wolfe joins me in congratulating Guy Guérette, Eudore Lemay, Michel Champagne and Pierre Laliberté, our four marathon runners and chrysotile asbestos miners.

Nafta
Statements By Members

April 10th, 1997 / 1:55 p.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, when the Prime Minister arrived in Washington a few days ago he said he had no serious issues to discuss. I beg to differ.

I recall that prior to the last election there was one item that seemed extremely important to him. It is even included on page 24 of the red book: "A Liberal government will renegotiate the NAFTA to obtain a subsidies code, an anti-dumping code and a more effective dispute resolution mechanism". There was even talk about abrogating the agreement if satisfactory changes could not be negotiated.

What has happened to that promise? Is it no longer important? I suppose we can add it to the heap of other Liberal broken promises like dumping the GST, getting to the bottom of the Somalia affair and eliminating interprovincial trade barriers.

It is indeed a cynical government that makes promises that it knows it cannot keep.

Railways
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, many of my constituents are concerned about the fact that U.S. based heavy construction equipment and workers have crossed the border to perform routine train derailment wrecking services.

Any justification for such actions based on the claim that such equipment and expertise are unavailable in Canada is just plain false. Canadian crews do this kind of work all the time and they do it well. They could have done the work recently performed in Winnipeg and in Bala, Ontario. There was no emergency and no need to import such services. Canadian crews and Canadian equipment were available.

I join with CAW local 101 of Winnipeg in calling on the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to conduct a full investigation into CP Rail's actions. The least this Liberal government could do is make sure Canadian workers do not lose their jobs to Americans because CP Rail is allowed to do whatever it likes.

Spring Sprint
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—Woodbine, ON

Mr. Speaker, spring is in the air. One of the ways we know that spring has arrived is that the 10th annual Beaches Spring Sprint was held this past weekend in my Toronto riding. What better way to shake off the winter blues and enjoy some fresh air and exercise than a run along the shores of Lake Ontario?

A record 830 participants ran the five kilometre race along the boardwalk to raise $6,000 for the Beaches Recreation Centre which is celebrating its 25th anniversary. The runners were assisted by 130 volunteers who demonstrated good community spirit in organizing the race. They made sure everything went along smoothly.

I congratulate the runners and the volunteers on a job well done. The money raised will go to maintain various programs at the Beaches Recreation Centre and to purchase new equipment. Congratulations to all who were involved.

Pacific Salmon Treaty
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, current negotiations between Canada and the United States over Canadian complaints that the United States is violating the conservation norms of the Pacific salmon treaty of 1985 have seen a breakthrough in traditional diplomatic methods. There is direct involvement in the negotiations of the actual stakeholders, the active fisher people in both countries who have the most to lose from any violation of the treaty norms.

In a series of direct meetings whose consensus is reported back to the two governments, the Canadian and U.S. fisher people bring both practical experience and also human concerns to a traditionally rather abstract technical bureaucratic process. Why not? It is the new pluralism. It balances the new co-operative federalism, which the federal government is now seeking to pursue with the Government of British Columbia, in implementing the Fryer commission's

unanimous report on solutions to west coast fisheries problems and in seeking to establish permanent federal-B.C. partnership at the fisheries administration level.

Journalist Claude Picher
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Roger Pomerleau Anjou—Rivière-Des-Prairies, QC

Mr. Speaker, this evening, Claude Picher, a journalist who has been reporting on economic and financial matters since 1975, will receive the Hyman Solomon award for the quality of his work in journalism. He is the first francophone Quebecer to receive this prestigious award.

The Hyman Solomon award is given out by the public policy forum, which comprises representatives from government, labour and management. This award recognizes the work of journalists providing in-depth reporting on complex public interest matters to clearly explain the issues and their implications in everyday life.

Claude Picher undoubtedly deserves this award. His lucid analysis, clear explanations and limpid style significantly contribute to Quebecers' growing interest in economic matters.

Our congratulations to you, Mr. Picher, on behalf of all Quebecers.

Vimy Ridge
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Lethbridge
Alberta

Reform

Ray Speaker Lethbridge

Mr. Speaker, 80 years ago yesterday a Canadian identity was forged at the battle for Vimy Ridge. That day 100,000 Canadians took a critical German stronghold, something the French and British units twice failed to do.

The price was high: 3,600 dead and more than 10,000 wounded. But the hottest flame produces the strongest steel. The sacrifices made that day won Canada a seat at Versailles and membership among the family of nations.

The people of France have not forgotten this sacrifice. Nearly 2,000 gathered to watch France's veterans affairs minister award six Canadian survivors the French Veterans Medal.

A number of our World War II veterans also attended yesterday's ceremony, one of whom I know personally. Retired air force Captain Ken Branch of Lethbridge served as a pilot overseas in that war. He returned safely, unlike many of his comrades, and Lethbridge has profited ever since. His contributions have enriched the lives of many in our community.

To Ken Branch and the thousands of other Canadian men and women who sacrificed in order that we might remain free, I say thank you.

Kerrick Flatt
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise today to recognize Master Kerrick Flatt, a young Burlington resident.

Kerry Flatt is a fine example of a young Canadian. He is someone who demonstrated remarkable courage by his outstanding actions on March 23, 1997. On that day, seven-year-old Kerry rescued his father from the frozen waters of Manitouwabing Lake near Parry Sound, Ontario after he and his father fell through the ice.

Kerry risked his own life and has been recognized for his bravery by the Governor General of Canada with a medal of bravery. This medal is given to those Canadians who come to the aid of their fellow citizens in spite of hazardous circumstances.

Please join me in congratulating this heroic young man for his selfless act and in wishing Kerry continued courage and dedication to his family, to our community and to our country.

Cancer
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, cancer killed almost 60,000 Canadians in 1994. April is cancer prevention month, and many individuals and organizations are looking for funds to support cancer research and to find a cure to this disease which cruelly destroys too many human lives.

Today in Ottawa, there is a young boy from British Columbia. Mike Cuccione is 12 and very talented. In his young life, he has defeated Hodgkin's disease twice.

During his tribulations, Mike wrote five songs which he recorded on a CD. The disc was launched in November and Mike has raised $100,000 since then. The money will go to cancer research and to the B.C. Children's Hospital.

Mike recently won the Vancouver Leader of Tomorrow award and was a finalist in the Terry Fox award. Mike is here to meet the Prime Minister of Canada. His dream is to make a difference and, inspired by his songs, he never gives up hope, he never gives up faith, he never gives up love.

I would like to congratulate Mike and his marvellous family for his excellent work and successes.