House of Commons Hansard #164 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was telemarketing.

Topics

Liberal Party
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Dave Chatters Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, I will be returning to my riding of Athabasca this afternoon to begin my second election campaign, probably next week.

In spite of the endless promises from the Prime Minister to return integrity to the political process, we already have Liberal candidates out there promising to repeal the gun law, save medicare, end subsidies to business and get tough on crime. The list goes on.

Actions speak louder than words. Look at the Liberal record. If a Liberal MP dares to speak up for his constituents against gun control, he has been and will be punished by his leader. Is cutting funding for medicare by 40 per cent what the Liberals mean by protecting medicare? Remember the interest free loan to Bombardier, which just announced record profits?

What about the B.C. court case for the man who beat, raped and sodomized a young woman and did not even receive a jail sentence as a result of the justice minister's alternative measures act?

Yes, actions do speak louder than words.

University Of Western Ontario
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate the more than 250 researchers at the University of Western Ontario, including Dr. Bob Sica, a London West resident, who have received research grants through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. The grants are part of the $260 million research competition of the council, peer reviewed.

Dr. Sica will be using a laser radar system developed at the University of Western Ontario, in co-operation with the mirror telescope system developed in Quebec, to help improve forecasting and measurement of global warming.

The project brings together Canadian ingenuity and serves as an excellent example of the benefits of scientific research. The investments we make today will produce benefits for the future, ensuring a thriving, innovative research community in Canada which all members support.

From the Canada Foundation for Innovation to the support of the work being conducted by Dr. Sica and his peers, the government has demonstrated a continuing commitment to research. I congratulate the federal government for its leadership in this area.

Anzac Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

John Richardson Perth—Wellington—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to speak on ANZAC day. Some will wonder why are we recognizing ANZAC day in Canada.

ANZAC day originally commemorated the landing of the Australian and New Zealand army corps at the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey on April 25, 1915.

Since that time and with the battles of the second world war and the ensuing battles in Korea and Southeast Asia, those countries have chosen this to be their remembrance day, similar to our remembrance day.

The significant feature about ANZAC day in Gallipoli is the little known fact that the Royal Newfoundland Regiment played a significant part in that battle. This regiment suffered tremendous casualties at Gallipoli, both from Turkish gunners and from the terrible flood which swept through their encampment.

The Royal Newfoundland Regiment has served with great honour at Gallipoli and in France. It made great sacrifices. We want to thank them for their contribution.

Employment
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Leblanc Cape Breton Highlands—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the Canada-Nova Scotia Labour Market Development agreement announced in Halifax yesterday.

This historic agreement is proof that the Government of Canada is committed to helping unemployed Canadians get back to work.

It is a made in Nova Scotia agreement. The province will assume full responsibility for benefits and employment measures designed to meet the needs of Nova Scotia workers and employers.

The Government of Canada will provide more than $200 million over the next three years for these measures from the employment insurance account.

This agreement is also proof of a new approach to renewing Canadian federalism. It delivers on the Prime Minister's promise to

withdraw from labour market training and negotiate new partnerships with the provinces and territories.

Similar agreements have been signed with Alberta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Manitoba and Quebec. The Government of Canada is continuing to negotiate with other provinces and territories.

In partnership, we will ensure together that the right things are done in our communities to achieve our common goal, getting Canadians back to work.

1995 Referendum
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning we learned that the federal government as well had a secret financial plan in the event of a yes vote in the 1995 referendum, something the federal finance minister has always refused to admit.

This is indeed proof that, beyond the political discourse of hard line federalists, there are two levels of government ready to assume their respective responsibilities so that the will of the people of Quebec, as expressed democratically in a referendum, can be realized in an atmosphere of calm and trust.

Yesterday, on the occasion of the Quebec-Maine joint venture trade mission, the senator for the State of Maine told the premier of Quebec that, in the event of sovereignty, and I quote: "We intend to maintain a strong relationship with Quebec". As for the governor of that state, it would be "business as usual".

With the Plan B scare tactics they are using on a people whose only wish is to fulfil their own destiny, if the federalists need a secret financial plan after the next referendum, it will be to clean up a mess of their own making.

Member For Lethbridge
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Lethbridge
Alberta

Reform

Ray Speaker Lethbridge

Mr. Speaker, on the eve of a 1997 federal election, my wife asks the question, will she or will she not know what to do with me?

Before each of nine elections, she prepared herself for the vigorous schedule of the campaign, knocking on doors, the thousand-plus phone calls, dealing with the content and the discontent.

Thirty-odd years of having breakfast, dinner and quiet evenings interrupted by a concern in somebody's life, but seven days a week on the job was a good reason to stay young and let 34 years escape so quickly.

My wife and I can say that in 30-some years of political life together, we leave this part of public life with a good feeling of remembering every experience, whether with an individual, a group or an organization as positive and memorable. We leave with no hurt in our heart.

Today, I want to pay tribute and give my best wishes to all the spouses who will work side by side with their partners in this election. I also want to thank the spouses who have sacrificed for us in this Parliament and who were always there when we needed that quiet word of encouragement.

Today I want to say a special thanks and pay tribute to my wife, Ingrid.

Member For Lethbridge
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

Ray, you have served your province and your country well. I thank you for your great service to Canada.

Member For Lethbridge
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Canadian Economy
Statements By Members

April 25th, 1997 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, the International Monetary Fund has just announced that it anticipates unparalleled economic growth for Canada in the next few years.

The Fund's director said, and I quote: "There is a very solid base, not only for rapid growth this year, perhaps the strongest among industrialized countries, but for a solid and healthy performance for many years to come".

In recent months, a great many analysts have observed with satisfaction that the annual inflation rate in Canada is 2 per cent. Short term interest rates are lower than in the United States and the Canadian deficit is shrinking.

This astonishing economic outlook is no accident. It is the direct result of our policies and of our responsible management of the public purse.

Quebec Premier
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Carleton—Gloucester, ON

Mr. Speaker, according to a survey in Le Devoir , 63 per cent of Quebecers want Lucien Bouchard not to interfere in the next election campaign. Even 50 per cent of Bloc Quebecois supporters, moreover, want him to stay out of it.

There are two excellent reasons in favour of Lucien Bouchard's staying out of the federal election. The first is that the majority of Quebecers are demanding it, and the second is that, if he had a bit of confidence in the capacity of the Bloc and its leader to survive without him, he would mind his own business and look after his own provincial affairs.

Chinese Community
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Gaston Leroux Richmond—Wolfe, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Chinese community has constituted an important part of society in Quebec and Canada since the arrival of the first Chinese immigrants in 1858. Their participation in railway construction and in both world wars are but two of many examples of their inestimable contribution to all sectors of our society.

Yet the legislation permitting exclusion of persons of Chinese origin was abolished only on May 1, 1947. This week we shall be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Citizenship Act, which finally enfranchised Chinese-Canadians. In order to commemorate the abolition of this discriminatory act, and to encourage equal opportunities to participate in, and contribute to society, the Chinese Canadian Council is organizing a series of events this week.

I join with them in recognition of these generations of Quebecers and Canadians of Chinese origin who fought against discriminatory legislation and battled for citizenship.

Member For Elk Island
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, what a privilege it has been to have been a member of the House of Commons for this session.

As I stand here I look around and see all my colleagues. I have learned a deep respect for parliamentarians and their work. I have come to respect not only members of my party but I have a new respect for members of all other parties. I think particularly of members of the Bloc who have a vastly different political agenda than we do. However I respect them as individuals and wish we could stay together.

I think highly of the support staff in the House. They have served us well. I am pleased to say so. One group that is often unnoticed in our committee meetings and in the House are those behind the glass doors in the little cubby holes. They are the people who do the interpretation. They are important to those of us who are unilingual. I thank them. I have great admiration for anyone who can hear in one language and simultaneously speak in another. My thanks go to all.

National Composting Awareness Week
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Cowling Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, this week communities across Canada including my constituency of Dauphin-Swan River are involved in the celebrations of National Composting Awareness Week.

Local recycling programs have tremendous support. Organic waste represents 30 per cent to 50 per cent of Canada's total waste. It is imperative that greater attention be placed on diverting this valuable material to a more productive usage.

Reclaiming the organic waste from landfill by applying compost to our soil will result in many benefits including improved plant growth. No longer must organic waste be thought of as garbage but rather as a valuable renewable resource.

Canadian Armed Forces
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of National Defence.

This morning we heard that military personnel were involved in a series of incidents in Cambodia, including physical abuse, racism, arms trafficking and running a brothel.

The army has been involved in a series of scandals in Somalia, in Bosnia-Herzegovina and now in Cambodia. What does the government intend to do to restore discipline among these and all other members of the Canadian military?

Canadian Armed Forces
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Perth—Wellington—Waterloo
Ontario

Liberal

John Richardson Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence and Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for his question.

There were allegations that events occurred in 1992-93. I understand that the allegations were investigated and wherever there was substantiation action was taken. The file has been made available under access to information. It is available in the reading room of the department to anyone, including the hon. member if he wishes to review the entire history of those investigations.