House of Commons Hansard #164 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was telemarketing.

Topics

Canada Elections Act
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, I add my voice to the government House leader's to say that, while we may not always have seen eye to eye and agreed on how things should go, we have always appreciated your honest and straightforward approach in the position you occupy.

It was a pleasure to be here to defend the interests of Quebec of course, but also, in some ways, those of Canada, since we played our part as watchdogs on a number of issues. I very sincerely hope we will be back with a new mandate to work together toward Canada's prosperity, and especially Quebec's.

Canada Elections Act
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Lethbridge
Alberta

Reform

Ray Speaker Lethbridge

Mr. Speaker I would also like to add my thanks on behalf of the Reform caucus to you as Speaker of the House. I also note our appreciation for the give and the take, the adversarial system, the democratic system, working well in the House during the 35th Parliament.

The challenge was great for you when we started. There were some 200 new members you had to assist and bring through a very delicate process at times. We think you have done well. We would

like to thank you for your service and we look forward to the service that will be provided in the 36th Parliament of Canada.

Canada Elections Act
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Canada Elections Act
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to add to what has already been said in regard to the possibility that we all, including yourself, may not be here next week to enjoy each other's company.

Although our differences are a matter of public record with respect to how this Parliament was organized in its early days in terms of party status and other matters like that, I have never questioned your dedication to this institution and the fairness you have been able to exercise within the limits that have been set and that to some degree you set for yourself early in this Parliament.

For the benefit of others, although some members of Parliament may well know this, some of us have had the benefit of attending Forum for Young Canadians dinners. One thing that has always struck me in talking to these young people has been the very deep impression that you, Mr. Speaker, have made on them. I am not kidding when I say that they rave about you, Mr. Speaker, at dinner time. They have come away from the sessions they have had with you, Mr. Speaker, with a respect and an affection for Parliament, for this institution and for our country. For that in particular we owe you a great vote of thanks.

Canada Elections Act
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Reform

Jim Silye Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, what would the last day be without a point of order?

During question period a topic came up about a smelly substance and I would like to identify that as a Liberal deodorant called Shameless.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

The Speaker

That is not a point of order.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

12:05 p.m.

Reform

Lee Morrison Swift Current—Maple Creek—Assiniboia, SK

Mr. Speaker, a point of order. I would like to point out a geographic fact. Saskatchewan is all in one time zone. It is on continuous mountain daylight saving time. As usual the hon. House leader for the Liberal Party does not know what he is talking about.

Order In Council Appointments
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Winnipeg North
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Parliamentary Secretary to Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table two sets of documents. First, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, a number of order in council appointments which were made by the government.

Pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 110(1), these have been referred to the appropriate standing committees, a list of which is attached.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Winnipeg North
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Parliamentary Secretary to Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 31 petitions.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

London West
Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, a report from the Canadian branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association concerning the 46th parliamentary seminar which took place March 4 to 15, 1997, in Westminster, United Kingdom.

Genuine Progress Indicator Act
Routine Proceedings

April 25th, 1997 / 12:10 p.m.

NDP

Vic Althouse Mackenzie, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-439, an act respecting the measurement of economic activity by criteria that reflect resource consumption and environmental stress.

Mr. Speaker, this bill is an attempt to provide for the establishment of a genuine progress indicator which would reflect the cost of all natural resources consumed and the environmental debt incurred during the process of production, to give a more realistic measure of real progress.

It would also require that whenever a change in the gross domestic product is cited in official documents, the genuine progress indicator or change therein must also be cited.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Act To Vacate The Conviction Of Louis Riel
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel St. Boniface, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-440, an act to vacate the conviction of Louis Riel.

Mr. Speaker, this bill, entitled an act to vacate the conviction of Louis Riel, has two purposes.

First, this bill would vacate the conviction of Louis Riel. Second, it would recognize Mr. Riel as a father of Confederation, a point that I have made in the House of Commons in addressing a government motion of 1992.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Territorial Protection Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Len Hopkins Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-441, an act respecting the territorial integrity of Canada.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this enactment is to affirm Canada's sovereign indivisibility and to preserve its territorial integrity.

The Constitution of Canada formed a federal state that is one and indivisible because this best serves the interests of all Canadians. It would secure the reputation that Canada now enjoys in the world community as a nation in which two founding cultures and other diverse elements have already demonstrated an ability to live and work together for the common good within a strong and united federation, Canada.

It is based on the fact that there is no provision in the Constitution for the withdrawal from the federation of a province or territory, that the federation may not be deprived of any part of the territory of Canada except with its consent by due process of constitutional amendment, and that no province or territory may unilaterally withdraw from the federation.

No province or territory shall either unilaterally or in conjunction with any other province or territory attempt to or declare its intention to secede from the federation and form a separate state. Canada is constitutionally sovereign and indivisible and extends fairness to all cultures in all parts of this nation.

No province or territory shall initiate, authorize, sponsor or permit a referendum to be held on any question purporting to seek a mandate for the withdrawal or indeed the intent of withdrawing of that province or territory from the federation without the federation's consent.

I present this for the consideration of the House.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

National Capital Act
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-442, an act to amend the National Capital Act.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present this bill to the House. Our government was elected and has continued to pursue a policy of open consultative government.

The National Capital Commission established under the National Capital Act has as its purpose to develop a capital that is a source of pride and a force of unity for all Canadians. In the process of doing that, it interacts very strongly with local governments and has, in its decisions, a very strong impact on the local community.

This bill calls for amendments to the National Capital Act to require, under certain circumstances and with certain limitations, that the National Capital Commission hold its meetings in public and consult with the public in making its decisions.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)