House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Foreign Publishers Advertising Services Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

An hon. member

They would not be there if Canadians did not want them.

Foreign Publishers Advertising Services Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sheila Copps Hamilton East, ON

Of course. People are very much entitled and open to subscribing to and receiving American magazines. There is absolutely nothing in this legislation that will stop that.

What this legislation will do is it will ensure that when my daughter becomes a mother, her children will be able to read stories about her country, her geography and her history. That will be the legacy of this legislation. If that is protectionist—

Foreign Publishers Advertising Services Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Speaker

I am sure the hon. member will resume after question period. We will now begin Statements by Members.

Generation Xx Youth Centre
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Joe McGuire Egmont, PE

Mr. Speaker, the Generation XX Youth Centre in Summerside has just won the 1998 Commonwealth Youth Service Award.

The Generation XX Youth Centre provides a gathering place and programming for youth in a drug and alcohol free environment. The centre was developed by a group of young people under the guidance of Constable Mike Rioux of the Summerside police force.

Together they took an old building which in an earlier life had been a curling club and a trade school and through hard work and dedication to the cause transformed it into a concert hall and Atlantic Canada's only indoor skateboarding facility.

The whole concept originated when a group of teenagers hanging out in a Tim Horton's parking lot was asked to leave by the local police. This was followed by the question “Where do you want us to go?”

Constable Rioux then realized the problem. There was no place for teenagers in Summerside to go. The rest, as they say, is history.

Congratulations to the young people, manager Gordie Whitlock and their mentor, Constable Rioux.

Sydney Tar Ponds
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, when I was first elected five years ago, I visited the worst environmental disaster in Canada, the Sydney tar ponds in Nova Scotia. At that time I urged the environment minister to implement a viable long term solution. Two weeks ago I returned to Sydney to find little change. More than 15 years and over $70 million has been wasted and the people of Sydney are still waiting for a resolution.

Yesterday another study was released which concluded that Sydney residents have almost a 50% higher risk of cancer than the rest of Nova Scotia. How much more evidence do federal and provincial governments need to take action on this issue?

In addition, the people next to the coke oven site on Frederick Street must be relocated. We would not live there, why should we expect them to?

Cleaning up Sydney must be a priority. The time for studies is over. The time for action is now.

North-South Centre Of The Council Of Europe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Caccia Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe awards a prize to two people for their outstanding achievement in human rights, pluralistic democracy and global solidarity.

This year the north-south prize goes to Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs, thus recognizing his work for a treaty banning the production, trade and use of landmines.

The chairman of the north-south centre calls the minister's efforts “an outstanding and very practical contribution to the protection of human rights in a north-south context”.

The other winner is Graca Machel of South Africa for her efforts to protect children from the devastation of war in her native Mozambique.

Tomorrow, the Minister of Foreign Affairs will receive from the President of Portugal in the Portuguese parliament this prestigious award. I invite members of the House to join me in congratulating the award winners, Graca Machel and the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

North-South Centre Of The Council Of Europe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, in the Parliament of Portugal, the honourable Lloyd Axworthy, Minister of Foreign Affairs, will receive the north-south prize awarded by the Council of Europe—

North-South Centre Of The Council Of Europe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

I would remind the hon. member that we do not usually mention the name of members. We must only mention their title.

North-South Centre Of The Council Of Europe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

I apologize, Mr. Speaker.

Tomorrow, in the Parliament of Portugal, the Minister of Foreign Affairs will receive the north-south prize awarded by the Council of Europe. This prize is awarded each year to two persons, from the northern and southern hemispheres, who distinguished themselves internationally by championing democracy, human rights and solidarity around the world.

The minister has earned this prestigious honour for his relentless effort to ban the production, storage and sale of antipersonnel mines. All Canadians can be proud of his work.

I invite my colleagues in this House to join me in congratulating the recipient of the 1998 north-south prize, the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

North-South Centre Of The Council Of Europe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Roy H. Bailey Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise to tell the House and all Canadians of an increasing economic gravity facing thousands of farmers in western Canada.

In 1938 the sale of 26 bushels of wheat would clothe a farmer for the winter. In 1998 it would take 206 bushels to clothe a farmer for the winter. In 1938 the combined property tax to pay the taxes on 640 acres of cultivated land would take a mere 273 bushels. Today on the same section of land it would take 1,443 bushels.

If this economic disaster area does not receive some immediate help, the results will the threefold. First, there will be an increase in abandoned farms. Second, there will be an increase in bankruptcies and, third, there will be an increase in financial foreclosures.

We must not turn our backs on—

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Windsor—St. Clair.

Danielle Campo
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Shaughnessy Cohen Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to congratulate a fine Canadian athlete from my riding. Danielle Campo, Tecumseh's 13 year old superstar, set several new world records at the world championships for swimmers with disabilities in Christchurch, New Zealand, last week.

Danielle initially clocked a world record in the women's 50 metre freestyle heats and then bested her performance beating out swimmers much older and much bigger than her to win the gold and grab victory for Canada later that day. She has now gone on to win three more gold medals for her team and for Canada.

This young woman's courage, hard work, determination and desire in the face of limitations should be an example to us all as we strive for our dream.

I ask members to join me in congratulating Danielle, her coach Mike Moore, and all the Canadian athletes competing at the world swimmers championships in Christchurch.

Canadian National
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Mercier Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, 3,000 CN employees read in the papers that they were about to lose their jobs. This is a rather disrespectful, not to say improper way to make such an announcement. In the meantime, the federal transport and finance ministers expressed their compassion not for the employees about to be laid off, but for the company, stating that they understood the financial reasons behind this decision.

The Bloc Quebecois virulently decries the loss of these jobs at CN and is shocked to see Paul Tellier, as president and CEO of CN, let go of 3,000 workers just to please the market, 3,000 workers who have to take care of their families who will now be facing insecurity and instability.

To quote the Quebec director of the Canadian Auto Workers, this announcement is worse than a baseball bat. He is right, because as we all know by now, swinging a baseball bat is the government's way to show compassion.

Health Research Awareness Week
Statements By Members

October 22nd, 1998 / 2:05 p.m.

Reform

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, next week is Health Research Awareness Week. I urge Liberals to attend any of the events to be held across Canada during that week. We hope Liberals can learn something about health awareness.

The Prime Minister and his government must allow Canadians the freedom to choose health products. Canadians do not want heavy handed government regulations that classify as drugs things like safe dietary supplements, functional foods and nutriceuticals.

Let us protect the freedom of choice for Canadians to choose natural remedies and cures for healthy lifestyles. Canadians are sick of the Liberal health care system that only deals with people when they need medical treatment.

Canadians want our health system to help us be healthy. Good health can prevent the need for costly medical treatment. We are proud of the efforts of the Association of Canadian Teaching Hospitals in sponsoring Health Research Awareness Week.