House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was magazines.

Topics

Brian Mulroney
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Elsie Wayne Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, he has been called a pioneer on a global scale. Free trade, NAFTA, tax reform and privatization, the creation of the Nunavut Territory, commitment to human rights, the UN World Summit for Children, accountability in government, redress for Japanese Canadians, the Canadian Space Agency, an acid rain agreement with the U.S. and the green plan were all examples of his remarkable legacy.

Under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney the deficit was cut in half as a percentage of GDP. Government operational spending was cut by 70%. Inflation reached a 30 year low and the bank rate stood at its lowest level in two decades. It was under Brian Mulroney that Canada first achieved its status as the best country in which to live.

As Brian Mulroney is made a Companion of the Order of Canada we salute his courage in pursuing a renewed Canada, his commitment to preparing our nation for the millennium, his sense of duty and love for his country. To Brian, Mila and the family we say thanks for their profound contribution—

Brian Mulroney
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Scarborough Southwest.

Hungary
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, 42 years ago tomorrow, on October 23, 1956, the flame of freedom briefly burned to light the darkness of Stalinist Hungarian communism. Thousands died in a revolution for democracy and human rights and against dictatorship. If only these heroic freedom fighters were alive today to see the fruits which the tree of liberty has borne in Hungary nourished as they were by their blood.

Since 1990 successive Hungarian governments have worked to establish a solid democracy that is respectful of minority and human rights. Hungary is now our partner in NATO. Only the passage of time has been able to reveal to us the success that sprang from a revolution so brutally suppressed.

Freedom loving individuals the world over salute those who gave their lives to advance the cause of liberty 42 years ago.

Seniors
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, on October 13, the Canadian government had some good news for seniors.

Starting in 1999, seniors will no longer have to fill out separate forms in addition to their income tax returns for their guaranteed income supplement or spouse's allowance.

Consequently, starting next year, both benefits will be automatically renewed when seniors send their income tax returns by April 30.

Previously, they had to submit a new application every year, before March 31, to continue to receive their guaranteed income supplement or spouse's allowance.

By cutting red tape, our government is making seniors' lives easier.

Fisheries
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, after 400 years of self-sufficiency the town of Canso, Nova Scotia, will have to proclaim civic bankruptcy early in the new year. This is a direct result of the policy of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to privatize the fishery. It is a classic example of how the policies of the government can devastate the economy of a small coastal community.

In the town of Mulgrave, Nova Scotia, a processing plant is moving to Newfoundland because DFO will not allow the company to access the northern shrimp allocation. At the same time the Liberal government gives away shrimp to foreign nations, shrimp that could be used to save over 100 jobs in Mulgrave. This is an absolute disgrace.

The government is forcing Canadians on to welfare when all they have ever done and all they want to do is to work and become active members of society. The government and the people who run DFO should be absolutely ashamed of themselves.

Gap Between Rich And Poor
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to a study by the Center for Social Justice, the gap between rich and poor keeps getting wider, while the middle class is being squeezed, partly as a result of the current government's social policies.

This gap did not happen by chance. It is due in part to the government's drastic cuts in health, education and income security. Since coming to power, the Liberals have reduced the per capita social transfer from $678 to $386 a year. This gap is also the direct result of the current government's relentless attacks on the unemployed, who have seen their benefits cut by $20 billion.

No matter how adamant the Prime Minister is that children are his number one priority, that his greatest responsibility is towards young people, the figures in the study are calling him to order and requiring him to act so that women, young people and low income families can live with dignity.

Violence
Statements By Members

October 22nd, 1998 / 2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, violence affects us all emotionally, socially and economically, but a simple “can I help you” can make a huge difference. This is the message being presented this week during the YWCA's Week Without Violence.

Forty YWCAs will encourage Canadians to consider the violence they face in their own lives. Their activities include information displays, vigils, poster competitions, guest speakers, music concerts and family fun days. The week will address different types of violence by devoting each day to a different theme.

Week Without Violence has a superb website. It can be reached at www.ywcacanada.ca.

I congratulate the YWCAs in Peterborough and elsewhere on this endeavour and extend their message to all members of the House: get involved and do not be afraid to offer assistance to someone in need.

Chief Justice Brian Dickson
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

David Price Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay tribute to Chief Justice Brian Dickson who passed away on Saturday.

As a young man, Dickson served bravely in the Royal Canadian Artillery in Europe during World War II where he was seriously wounded. When he was later named to the Supreme Court of Canada he said:

In understanding the responsibilities to which I have been called, I dedicate myself to maintain the great tradition of this court, to search for truth and to use such judicial power as is mine to resolve fairly the basic questions about justice and liberty, the rights of the individual and the authority of the state.

He lived up to and surpassed these ideals. I had the privilege of meeting Chief Justice Dickson this spring at defence committee meetings where he vigorously defended the report on the military that bears his name.

As Canada says goodbye to one of her most distinguished sons, the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada extends its condolences to his wife Barbara and their four children. We are grateful for the life Chief Justice Dickson led—

Chief Justice Brian Dickson
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for London—Fanshawe.

Women's History Month
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Pat O'Brien London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month. As a member of parliament who had the pleasure of teaching Canadian history for many years, I would like to recall the outstanding efforts of Canadian women during the two world wars and in particular during World War II.

Although women did not serve at the front as combat troops in our armed forces, they did play vital roles in support services, perhaps most notably in the field of intelligence. Of course many Canadian women made enormous sacrifices and contributions as part of medical teams often quite close to the fighting. Indeed some women paid the ultimate sacrifice as they gave their lives to help us win World War II.

On the home front women made an invaluable contribution as they worked tirelessly in our factories and on our farms to produce the food, weapons and ammunition necessary for the allies to defeat tyranny in Europe and in the Pacific. Canadian women both overseas and at home made great sacrifices and gave invaluable service during World War II so that we could enjoy the peace and freedom we all cherish.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's former director of operations, Jean Carle, is heard over and over again on the RCMP APEC audio tapes. But guess who is screening the tapes? The lawyer protecting the Prime Minister at the APEC hearings.

Why is Ivan Whitehall, the Prime Minister's APEC lawyer, being allowed to block access to those tapes?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the matter of these tapes, in today's Ottawa Citizen the member for Kootenay—Columbia is reported to have conceded to reporters that he has no idea what Carle might have been directing the RCMP to do or, indeed whether he may simply have been giving innocuous instructions about arrival and departure times and motorcade routes for the leaders.

Why does the hon. member not admit that when he made his allegations yesterday he did not really know what he was talking about?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the issue is the tapes. Let me make that very clear for the Deputy Prime Minister.

The solicitor for the Prime Minister is blocking access to the RCMP tapes. This is completely unconscionable and goes against anything reasonable.

I ask again why is the solicitor for the Prime Minister blocking access to the RCMP tapes?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I will have to check the accuracy of the hon. member's assertion. It may well be that he does not know anything more about what he is saying today than he did yesterday.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the counsel for the commission has acknowledged that the tapes exist. Yet despite repeated requests by the students for those tapes, they have not had one audio tape produced to them. This is evidence that the Prime Minister's solicitor is burying the tapes. Why?