House of Commons Hansard #79 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was debt.

Topics

Search And Rescue
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Fred Mifflin Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, we all have to have rules to follow particularly in the business of flying airplanes and driving ships. Rules are rules. Investigations have to be conducted whenever there is a chance that these rules may have been breached. This is the case and the investigation is under way.

Search And Rescue
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Jake Hoeppner Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, we are fully aware of the importance of air regulations and safety.

This clearly was a special case. This was not someone out joy riding. This person put his own safety on the line to help somebody else.

Why will the minister not recognize the heroic efforts of this man instead of trying to discredit his flying ability?

Search And Rescue
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Fred Mifflin Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, I have heard the Reform Party often talk about how rules should be enforced.

Given that Transport Canada's prime concern is safety, is the hon. member and the Reform Party suggesting that safety not be a top concern and that the possible violations of regulations not be investigated? I think not.

Pay Equity
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, earlier today the Canadian Human Rights Commission criticized federal government stall tactics on pay equity for setting an “unfortunate example” that invites employers in the private sector to use court challenges to evade the law as well.

My question is for the President of the Treasury Board. How does the government, entrusted with upholding the law, justify not only evading its own responsibility on pay equity, but also setting in place what the human rights commission calls a pattern of resistance that is being used to delay and deny justice for Canadian women across the country?

Pay Equity
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, the judgment of the federal court which was rendered last week and the one which was rendered yesterday indicate very clearly that the unions can lose their case in court and that the best way to look at pay equity is to negotiate it.

At present we are trying to negotiate with the various unions a system of pay equity that is equitable for everybody. The courts remind us that for our employees this is the best course to follow.

Job Creation
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Angela Vautour Beauséjour—Petitcodiac, NB

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians are still looking for those jobs the Liberals claim to have created.

The phone in my riding office has been ringing non-stop with calls from my constituents asking where those jobs are. Worse still, some of the people in my region no longer get EI because of the Liberal government's cuts.

When will the Prime Minister quit attacking the poor and start attacking the real problem, the lack of jobs, and when will he create a long-term job creation strategy to create real jobs rather than band-aid solutions like the ones announced by the Minister of Human Resources Development?

Job Creation
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the government is deeply committed to employment. That is why we have restored order to Canada's public finances and why interest rates are dropping significantly.

That is also why we have created the transitional job fund, which has been useful in the Atlantic provinces, New Brunswick in particular, where it has attracted private sector investments which have led to the creation of real, full-time jobs. Our priority is job creation.

The Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, many thousands of people in Atlantic Canada have been waiting in anticipation of the federal government announcement on the post-TAGS program. Can the Prime Minister now confirm that the federal cabinet met last week and has already made a final decision that there will be no follow up TAGS program in Atlantic Canada?

The Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, we have been working very hard on the post-TAGS environment. Mr. Harrigan produced a very healthy and very good report that will allow us to make the best decisions possible. We are consulting with the provinces right now. We are consulting with the communities, the fishers and the fish plant workers. It is very important that we address the issue the right way.

We made the announcement a long time ago that TAGS was ending in August. That is why we are now working on the post-TAGS environment.

The Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, if there is to be no post-TAGS program, the minister should be aware that Canada no longer has fish in excess of its needs and that foreign countries are presently fishing our resources. Will the minister immediately adopt recommendation No. 5, which would no longer permit foreign countries to fish inside our 200-mile limit, taking resources away from Atlantic Canadians who desperately need them?

The Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, the minister will respond to the specifics of the report in due time.

We have to abide by international obligations. If we were to kick the foreign fleets out tomorrow we would destroy thousands of jobs in Nova Scotia and I am certain the member does not want that. We have already been offering fish to Canadians first.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs. UNICEF is leading global efforts to end the use of child soldiers which include not just the 10-year old boy with an AK-47 assault rifle, but also many thousands of young girls who are abducted and forced into sexual slavery and child labour. What is the Government of Canada doing to address the exploitation of over 250,000 child soldiers around the world?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, a very important round table meeting was held in Ottawa yesterday. It involved experts from around the world who are dealing with this very serious humanitarian problem.

There are approximately three ways of attacking the problem. First, Canada is working very actively to amend the optional protocol to prohibit the use of child soldiers to make it an international covenant. Second, through the work of CIDA and other organizations, we are developing programs to help end the use of child soldiers in many countries by enabling them to return to their communities to get an education. Third, it is important that a number of private organizations and Parliament speak out against the vicious practice of using our young people in combat. This is something that Canada can once again take a humanitarian lead in around the world.

Tuition Fees
Oral Question Period

March 24th, 1998 / 2:45 p.m.

Reform

Rahim Jaffer Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, when I visited Montreal last week, a McGill University student asked me about the differences in tuition fees in Quebec. In the present system, students from other provinces are penalized.

We know that the provincial governments are trying to freeze tuition fees, but penalizing students from other provinces is not the solution.

Does the government feel that these different tuition fees are acceptable?

Tuition Fees
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, setting university tuition fee levels is a provincial jurisdiction. It is therefore up to the Government of Quebec to set tuition fees within Quebec.

I have already written to Mrs. Marois indicating that our government did not accept the idea of different tuition fees for citizens of this country, because equal access to these institutions was important, particularly for our francophone friends in Ontario and for our Acadian brothers and sisters in New Brunswick.