House of Commons Hansard #81 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

British Columbia
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, along the same line there has been plenty of rhetoric from the Reform Party about B.C. Let us look at some of the facts.

In 1998-99 transfers to British Columbia by the federal government will exceed $3.3 billion. This will account for 16% of B.C.'s estimated revenues. That works out to $825 per person.

The lowest interest rates in years means that B.C. has saved $340 million over the last three years. By increasing the cash floor component to the Canada health and social transfer, B.C. will get an additional $920 million over six years. On the infrastructure program, $277 million for B.C.

British Columbia needs more Liberal MPs, people who understand local issues, people—

British Columbia
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton East.

Hong Kong Veterans
Statements By Members

March 26th, 1998 / 2:05 p.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker: Shells rained down and brave men died, Canadians stood their ground. Their ranks finally broke, From the weight of superior force.

Interned in cells of true hell, Rotting flesh, disease and death abound. Convention was not a word Japan understood. Slavery for Hong Kong war prisoners was.

Four long years, Our soldiers were forced, To endure unspeakable horrors, And to slave at unbelievable tasks.

Sixty years hence nothing has changed. Japan and Canada have failed in their part, To compensate our brave Hong Kong veterans.

Questioned in this House November last, Committee resolve of December past, Both should have caused result Bud did not.

So I ask now When will government do honour to the task As the sands of time slip from our Hong Kong veterans' lives?

Immigration
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to clarify the position of this government once again with regard to the recommendations made to the honourable Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

The minister has stated on several occasions, as I have in this House, that the recommendations made by the review committee are simply recommendations. They were not made by the government and are not carved in stone. The minister took these recommendations straight to Canadians herself to get a firsthand account of their concerns and views.

I remind this House this is the first time a minister has conducted her own consultations and involved the public to such a degree. After consulting with Canadians the minister reiterated that we are not bound by any of the 172 recommendations, that language requirement is too excessive and we will not go that route.

I have spoken with constituents in my twin riding of North Vancouver and they have clearly stated that although our system of immigration does need changes, installing the suggested language recommendation is not one of them. I do not believe we can be any clearer on this issue.

Reform Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Reform Party is out of touch with the real concerns of the people of British Columbia. This party came to Ottawa promising to be constructive and to do politics differently. Instead, it has engaged in negative, divisive antics that have nothing to do with helping average Canadians. Canadians in British Columbia and elsewhere are concerned with maintaining and improving our health care system while Reformers worry about whether or not they can have a flag on their desk.

While this government sets the course for lower taxes, reduced debt and improved social programs, Reformers spend their time in Ottawa trying to start fist fights in the Chamber and slinging mud at the Prime Minister during their time in question period.

British Columbians want more than pandering to cheap politics from their representatives. They want someone who will bring jobs to their communities and someone who reflects their daily concerns. Subsequently I urge British Columbians to remember this when they cast their ballot next week—

Reform Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Souris—Moose Mountain.

Taxation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Roy H. Bailey Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, all Canadian families need tax relief. However, the government's tax credits discriminate against some families. The government will only give certain tax credits to families with both parents working outside the home. Is this fair?

I represent a rural riding where a third of the farms have both husband and wife running the operation. Statistics Canada says 42% of women provide their own child care. Interestingly enough, a recent poll said 77% of parents would prefer to have provided parental care instead of day care if they could do it all over again.

The Reform Party's family friendly budget would increase family wealth and it would allow parents the freedom to raise their family the way they chose.

Reform Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Brenda Chamberlain Guelph—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, who speaks for British Columbia? Not the 24 B.C. Reform members. They would rather spend their time in this Chamber making accusations about the Prime Minister that they dare not repeat outside the Chamber and riding around in a car that is painted like a flag in the middle of winter pretending to be more Canadian than anyone else.

Yet again the task of speaking out for the real interests of British Columbians falls to the province's Liberal members. Together they worked for measures in this last budget that directly benefited the provinces such as tax relief that will benefit over 92% of all B.C. taxpayers.

The millennium scholarship fund will give money directly to students. We are providing an annual grant of up to $400 to parents who are saving for their children's education through RESPs. That is what politics is all about.

Member For Sherbrooke
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, later in the day Jean Charest, the leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, will announce he is going to be a—

Member For Sherbrooke
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

We should not use each other's names in the House as long as we are here.

Member For Sherbrooke
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, later in the day the leader of the Conservative Party will announce he will be a candidate for the leadership of the Quebec Liberal Party and the leader of the federalist force in the province of Quebec. We wish him well in his endeavours.

The response of the Reform Party has been a partisan call to unite the right in this country. Instead of a call to unite the right it should be a call to unite federalist parties and unite this country around common goals that all Canadians can feel at home in Canada. That should be the goal.

I call on all our colleagues to work toward that common ground for all Canadian people.

At the provincial level, there is already a process under way to ensure Canadian unity that led to the Calgary declaration. Public hearings were held and they were well attended.

It is high time Parliament took its responsibility. The time has come to act.

World Poverty
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 1998, 1.3 billion people in the developing countries, or one-third of their population, are barely surviving, on less than a dollar a day. Every day, 34,000 children die of malnutrition and disease.

In light of these statistics, and in order to eradicate poverty, the Canadian Council for International Cooperation, in conjunction with some 100 organizations working in this area, has launched a campaign under the theme “In common”. The goal of the campaign is to enhance the political and public desire to eradicate poverty in the world.

When will the Minister of International Co-operation take some notice of this human distress? Instead of cutting funding for international aid, as was done in the latest budget, the government ought to be following the example of the CCIC and its partners.

Our congratulations to the Canadian Council for International Co-operation and its partners for this fine, and constructive, initiative.

Old Age Security
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

André Harvey Chicoutimi, QC

Mr. Speaker, the bill transforming the present old age pension into the seniors benefit will bring about a drop in available income for most retired persons and a loss of ground for women. What is more, 40% of workers have only public pension plans when they retire.

The AFEAS has been stoutly defending women seniors so as to ensure them of a decent retirement and to enable them to retain what they have acquired after many a long struggle. The public pension plans are essential if the majority of women are to enjoy a decent retirement.

The AFEAS is calling for the principle of individuality to be respected, for there to be a universal basic benefit and tax measures to enhance available income for the least well-off and to provide a tax break for the middle class, which has been crushed by the present government's taxation policies.

The AFEAS is therefore calling upon the Minister of Finance to reflect its recommendations in this new bill.

Reform Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, it seems that Reform MPs from B.C. have been so star struck by the paparazzi and glamour surrounding the visit of Prince Charles and his sons to B.C. that the usual political hyperbole has risen to new hysterical heights.

Yesterday in his statement in the House the member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca said the government uses health care as a political football to look good instead of putting patients first and giving politics a back seat.

The fact is the first reinvestment we made when our books were in reasonable order was in health care, raising the cash floor on transfers by $1.5 billion. As well, this last budget made real commitments in the areas of home care and medical research. That is what leadership is all about.

To date the people of British Columbia await one concrete suggestion from B.C. Reformers that would actually help them in terms of the health care system.

I have one thing to say. Go, Lou, go.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, on the issue of compensation for hepatitis C victims, I would like to quote what the Minister of Health said. “I do not think victims' claims should be bogged down for 10, 12 or 15 years before the courts.” That is exactly what the Liberal compensation plan is going to do.

I would like one of the Liberal members who is proud of this record to stand and tell me why Liberals are going to let half the victims go through the courts for fair justice.