House of Commons Hansard #81 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was finance.

Topics

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ahuntsic
Québec

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as the minister has said in this House, and if hon. members on the other side of the House will wait, she will be bringing back her response in legislation. Be patient, it will come.

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Jack Ramsay Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, unlike the justice minister, I do not have a team of lawyers and bureaucrats, yet six months ago I tabled a very complex bill to amend the Young Offenders Act in this House.

Who is causing the delay over there on the justice minister's side? Is it her team or is it her bleeding heart caucus which still feels that coddling violent young offenders is the way to go? Who is causing the delay over there?

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Ahuntsic
Québec

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I do not think the hon. member heard me. I just said that the minister will be, if he will be patient, tabling our response to the committee's report.

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Prime Minister.

The more experts look at the so-called millennium bug, the more they realize the magnitude of the problem, the uncertainty of the results and, consequently, the urgency to act.

Can the Prime Minister confirm that he just wrote to all his ministers to tell them that the year 2000 computer bug is now the government's top priority and that it takes precedence over everything else?

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Liberal

Walt Lastewka Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows very well that a number of reports on the year 2000 problem have been submitted to the industry committee. She knows that the industry minister started the research program with Jean Monty as chair to alert people about the year 2000 problem.

The government has a program in place. This has been reported to the industry committee. The next report on the government's progress with respect to the year 2000 problem will be coming in September.

We really need everyone in the House to publicize the importance of the year 2000 problem to everyone in their—

Status Of Women
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for the Status of Women. I campaigned in Port Moody, B.C., over the past few weekends. I heard from many women who are concerned about poverty, education and their children's futures. What measures does the government have to help women and children?

Status Of Women
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Vancouver Centre
B.C.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Secretary of State (Multiculturalism)(Status of Women)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has hit it right on the head. There are women living in poverty in many of the ridings we represent in Vancouver. There are single women who need education. A $3,000 a year grant will be given to women in financial hardship who have dependants so they can go to school and upgrade their training. This will be very important for some of the women in Vancouver East, in my riding, in the riding of the hon. member and in the riding she is talking about.

We are also talking about money for women entrepreneurs—

Status Of Women
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Okanagan—Shuswap.

Indian Affairs And Northern Development
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, unsettled native land claims and the supreme court's Delgamuutw decision are making land tenure in B.C. extremely uncertain. Mining and forestry jobs are disappearing for both natives and non-natives. How many more thousands of jobs must B.C. lose before the federal government addresses this burning issue?

Indian Affairs And Northern Development
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we are there in partnership with the province, First Nations and third parties to deal with a long outstanding issue.

For the sake of the House, members may not understand that in the province of British Columbia we do not have treaties with our First Nations.

I applaud the people of British Columbia for understanding the importance of negotiating treaties with the First Nations in that province. It will bring certainty not only to the third parties referred to by the hon. member but to First Nations as well.

Endangered Species
Oral Question Period

March 26th, 1998 / 2:40 p.m.

Reform

Rick Casson Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the last Parliament endangered species legislation died on the Order Paper because Canadians could not accept it. There was no public consultation and no respect for individual property rights. The environment minister has indicated that this heavy-handed legislation is about to reappear. Will the environment minister tell Canadians what steps she will take to protect individual property rights while endangered species are being protected?

Endangered Species
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Christine Stewart Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, this government has made a commitment to re-table our endangered species protection legislation and we will do so. Before doing so, I am in the process of consulting with the different sectors that may be implicated or impacted by this legislation. I believe we are coming to a consensus about a good piece of legislation to protect endangered species.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, according to the estimates tabled yesterday, the employment insurance surplus will be $19.6 billion next year.

The President of the Treasury Board thinks a huge surplus is essential in case we fall upon more difficult economic times in the future. But Canadian workers, from Kamloops to Caraquet to St. John's, Newfoundland, are already going through tough times as a result of the changes to employment insurance.

My question is for the President of the Treasury Board. Instead of letting people suffer, is the government prepared to immediately use the surplus in the employment insurance fund to help all the unemployed from coast to coast?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, as everyone knows, the amount of the surplus from contributions is set on a yearly basis by the commission. We must ensure that there will be enough for the economic cycle.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

An hon. member

My eye. Liar.