House of Commons Hansard #121 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was agreed.

Topics

The Economy
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, there are a number of factors that have been impacting on the performance of the dollar recently, lower commodity prices and the uncertainty about economic developments in some Asian countries.

However, let us be clear that the underlying fundamentals are behind a Canadian economy that remains strong. The OECD, for example, estimates that Canada will have the best fiscal performance in the entire G-7. Output and employment growth have been robust and inflation continues to be low. We are on a track that will continue to see this country grow right into the next millennium because the fundamentals are right.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, this government's leadership is sounding very similar to the former leadership in Indonesia, blaming the guys in red suspenders for the weakness in the Canadian dollar.

I would ask this government to do what it has done over the past four years and take advice from a Conservative because this government has used Conservative policies, including free trade, the GST and the deregulation of financial services in transportation, to reduce the deficit.

I now beseech this government to again take advice from a Conservative and provide this country with the leadership it needs. We need reduced taxes and we need a commitment to lower debt to provide the strength for the Canadian dollar in the long term.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, if we took advice from the Conservatives we would still have a $42 billion deficit. If we took advice from the Conservatives we would still have unemployment at least 3% higher than we have today. If we took advice from the Conservatives we would have record high interest rates and inflation.

Canadians say to the Conservatives no thank you, they do not need any more of that kind of advice.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the videotape of Private Dickey's interrogation or interview by military police officers she was told that the investigation would be dropped or suspended unless she came up with more evidence of sexual abuse.

What kind of investigative unit would ask the victim to go out and gather her own evidence in order to bring her attacker to trial?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the investigation continues as confirmed by the chief provost marshal, the head of the national investigative service. Why does the hon. member not let the investigation continue and at the end of the investigation questions of that sort, if necessary, can be gone into further?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, the hon. Deputy Prime Minister should have informed the defence minister of that caution before he spoke out to the media.

This investigation sucks. I was an investigator with the police department for 12 years and the investigation conducted by the NIS is shoddy at best. Victims of sexual assault need to know that their complaint is going to be handled fairly and professionally.

How can any victim of sexual assault be convinced that their complaints will be properly—

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I urge all hon. members to be cautious in their use of language both in the questions and in the answers.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that when the hon. member was a police officer conducting investigations for 12 years he did not engage in a debate with third parties and the press about how he was doing his work.

I ask the hon. member to apply to this situation the same approach he took in conducting his investigations, not conducting and debating them with third parties but carrying on his work so that the investigation would not be prejudiced.

Why is he asking in a way that is aimed at prejudicing the investigation instead of letting it come out with a fair and reasonable conclusion based on the investigation?

Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Yvan Bernier Bonaventure—Gaspé—Îles-De-La-Madeleine—Pabok, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, we read in the papers that the government is about to announce a $550 million program to replace TAGS.

This paltry measure represents only 25% of the previous program and is considered definitely insufficient by angry fishing communities.

Is the deputy prime minister aware that a mere $550 million to replace the Altantic Groundfish Strategy will not nearly be enough to placate the angry and dispirited fishers from the Magdalen Islands, from the Gaspé area and—

Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Veterans Affairs.

Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Fred Mifflin Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, I think the hon. member knows this is pure speculation and I am not going to comment on that.

We are very much aware of the situation. We have heard him and members in the House. We know each other and I think he knows that when this program is finalized it will address those issues he and other members of the House are concerned about

The government is working very hard to put this program together and it will be announced in the very near future.

Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Yvan Bernier Bonaventure—Gaspé—Îles-De-La-Madeleine—Pabok, QC

Mr. Speaker, of course, people speculate when they see that the members opposite are taking too much time to react.

By setting aside a mere $550 million to replace TAGS, the Minister of Human Resources Development is only deferring the problem, since it will take just six months to go through this money.

Does the government realize that, with only 25% of the budget of the previous program, it will be unable to take proactive measures to reorient the fish workers and will only point them towards civil disobedience?

Atlantic Groundfish Strategy
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Fred Mifflin Minister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member is not given to alarmist statements and superlatives that would exacerbate the situation.

We are very much aware there is a lot of anxiety in the Atlantic provinces and in Quebec. This process takes time because we have to consult with the province. We have to make sure we take the time to get it right because this has to be an excellent strategy. It has to be right and it has to be done soon.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

June 12th, 1998 / 11:35 a.m.

Reform

Mike Scott Skeena, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister of Indian Affairs knows that the Delgamuukw decision has created a great deal of uncertainty in British Columbia. She knows that the native summit is claiming 100% of the province and she knows that some bands are now taking action to stop logging and mining.

The minister says the way out of this is to negotiate, but that process to date has not produced any results.

How long does she think British Columbians will have to wait to see a resolution to this problem?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, not only I think the right approach is to negotiate aboriginal rights, it is the people of British Columbia, 9 out of 10, who say that the appropriate thing to do is settle land claims at the negotiating table.

It is the business community in British Columbia that understands settling land claims will add to the GDP of the province.

It is the supreme court which directs us to find in these modern times an appropriate way to reconcile aboriginal rights and directs us to do it at the negotiating table.