House of Commons Hansard #121 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was park.

Topics

The Environment
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Charles Caccia Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Ontario environment ministry is allowing dombind to be spread on country roads, a practice that has dangerous consequences.

Testing has shown a dramatic rise in dioxin levels on rural roads treated with dombind, a thick, sticky material made from pulp and paper waste.

It contains toxic substances, including dioxins, which are harmful to aquatic life, soil organisms, cattle and humans.

The Ontario government has issued a licence allowing dombind to be sprayed until next December. The licence to use dombind, otherwise known as the black liquor, should be revoked because of its potential harm to drinking water and the ecosystem.

Research And Development
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, the University of Waterloo and the consortium Watpark recently announced progress in the development of a 200 acre world-class research and technology park on campus.

Companies such as IBM Canada Ltd. and the Evergreen Foundation are participating in this consortium. This high tech park will encourage the creation or relocation of research-based companies, provide attractive employment opportunities in the high tech sector for co-op students and graduates and produce long term financial benefits that will help the university to enhance the quality and relevance of its programs.

I applaud this private and academic sector partnership for its initiatives that will be of great benefit to the Waterloo region, Ontario and Canada.

I also congratulate this Liberal government, the Ministers of Finance and Industry and the Secretary of State for Science, Research and Development for their support of the R and D sector.

Minister Of Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate an outstanding parliamentarian on his 25th year in public life.

Over these 25 years, Canadians have watched his move from a scholar to a politician dedicated to championing issues of social justice.

His commitment in this area is exemplified by his leadership role on the land mines treaty and his fierce determination to protect children from all types of abuses, including those which are a consequence of war and labour exploitation.

Lloyd Axworthy's understanding of public service for the common good is one of the many reasons for the longevity of his career.

I commend him for his dedication to and appreciation of public life, for his work in the House of Commons and on behalf of his constituents.

I call on my colleagues to join me in congratulating the hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs. Congratulations, Mr. Minister.

Minister Of Foreign Affairs
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I must caution the hon. member not to refer to hon. members by name, but by their title.

Government Spending
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Lee Morrison Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health would have us believe that there are no funds available to compensate hepatitis C victims, but in his previous portfolio he had no difficulty committing the government to a loopy firearms registration scheme that will cost hundreds of millions of dollars for no discernible benefit, a scheme that has already cost far more than his initial estimate with nothing yet to show for it.

There are no funds for victims of governmental ineptitude and hundreds of millions available for useless and repressive bureaucratic exercises.

The chairman of the Toronto police services board reported a 40% drop in the criminal use of firearms in the last four years. Just as this government continues to ignore the indignation of rural people, it is ignoring the fact that firearms are not a problem in our largest city.

Priorities, boys and girls. Priorities.

R-2000 Program
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Roy Cullen Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, an hon. member stood in the House last week and blamed the federal government's National Building Code and its R-2000 program for the so-called leaky condo crisis in British Columbia.

The R-2000 program is not to blame. There is absolutely no evidence to indicate that the use of air vapour barriers is a problem in the lower mainland or elsewhere in Canada. There have been no wall failures reported in R-2000 certified buildings in British Columbia.

The R-2000 program provides a basis for the design and construction of new homes which are more energy efficient. All R-2000 homes must comply with local and provincial building codes. CMHC, NRC, key stakeholders and the B.C. community are working together to come up with appropriate technical solutions that can be applied to repairs of affected buildings.

I am pleased also to inform the House that, based on research done by NRCan scientists, new seismic hazard information will become part of the year 2000 national building code.

Abitibi
Statements By Members

June 12th, 1998 / 11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out that tomorrow is the 100th anniversary of Abitibi's annexation to Quebec.

On June 13, 1898, the area around Abitibi, which had belonged to the Northwest Territories, joined Quebec following 25 years of discussions between the governments of Canada and Quebec.

An organizing committee under the aegis of the Abitibi-Témiscamingue cultural committee is co-ordinating an impressive number of commemorative and other activities, which will be taking place throughout the summer and continue until next winter. In addition, the committee plans to organize a conference in the fall on Abitibi's annexation to Quebec.

I congratulate the Abitibi-Témiscamingue cultural committee on this venture and I would like to point out that the people of Abitibi and my region are proud to belong to Quebec now and for always.

Happy celebrations.

Canadian Centre For Emergency Preparedness
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Beth Phinney Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Monday the Canadian Centre for Emergency Preparedness will be hosting its eighth annual world conference on disaster management in Hamilton.

Every year leaders in the field of emergency response examine lessons learned from the past year's worse natural and man-made disasters.

This year's conference features the eastern Ontario and Quebec ice storms, the Alberta fires and the Red River flood.

Emergency Preparedness Canada administers the joint emergency preparedness program and the disaster financial assistance arrangements program on behalf of the federal government.

This Liberal government has given tremendous support to ice storm victims and to those affected by the Alberta fires and the Red River flood victims. This emergency preparedness program is simply another way the Liberal government is helping Canadians in time of need.

The Senate
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Derrek Konrad Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, we have now been working together in this House since September and I must say it has been a pleasure working with everyone here over this period of time.

But as I say this on what appears to be our last day in this House before a three month recess, still nothing has been done about Senate reform. The Reform Party has remained committed to the idea of a triple E Senate and will continue to push for Senate reform.

The Prime Minister said that he is in favour of Senate reform, but yet just last night he snuck in five new senators. Shame. A whole session has gone by and still the Prime Minister has done nothing on the matter.

The vast majority of Canadians want Senate reform and want to be able to have a say in who represents them in the upper chamber, no matter how popular they may be. Canadians must have a voice.

Mr. Speaker, I think you will agree that it is time for the government to start listening to Canadians and to get real.

The Senate
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Steve Mahoney Mississauga West, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday parliament welcomed its newest left winger, the hon. “big M” Frank Mahovlich.

Over an illustrious career, Frank Mahovlich scored 626 goals, was selected to nine all-star teams and was on 6 Stanley Cup winners. He has been a hockey hero in the two historic hotbeds of the Canadian game: Toronto and Montreal.

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1981, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1990 and received the Order of Canada in 1994.

He has the kind of talent we need here in Ottawa: someone who knows how to stick handle, how to win in the corners and how to finish the play.

Indeed, we would put our “big M” up against the official opposition's “little M”, Preston Manning, any day of the week.

The Senate
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

If hon. members could restrain themselves somewhat, it would be easier for the Chair to hear breaches of order that are committed by members such as the hon. member who just mentioned a member of this House by name. I urge all hon. members to comply with the rules and only mention the title of the member or the constituency name, rather than the name of the member.

Firefighters
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Rick Laliberte Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to thousands of men and women across northern Canada who are fighting forest fires. All Canadians owe a great debt of gratitude for their courage, discipline and resourcefulness.

In Churchill River hundreds are fighting fires in northwestern Saskatchewan communities such as Île-à-la Crosse, Buffalo Narrows and La Loche. In northern Alberta they protected Swan Hills. In the Yukon they are fighting fires around Haines Junction and Whitehorse.

The federal government should recognize the valuable resources available across Canada to meet the challenges of natural disasters. As a nation we have faced many tragedies, like the Manitoba flood and the ice storms of 1998. These disasters could be addressed by the firefighters of northern Canada.

Today I extend thanks to all the firefighters in northern Canada for protecting our communities.

Chiapas
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, we were distressed to learn of the resignation of Mgr. Samuel Ruiz as the head of the national mediation commission in Chiapas.

With 40 years' service to the Indian communities in Chiapas, the Bishop of San Cristobal was acting as mediator between the Zapatistas and the Mexican authorities. His departure and that of all the members of the commission heighten fears of further military intervention in Chiapas.

The pressure, insults, attacks and criticism from as high up as President Zedillo sabotage every effort by Mgr. Ruiz to bring peace.

We regret the departure of this man of peace, especially since we heard reports this morning of a number of deaths in Mexico.

We hope that the Government of Mexico will express its intention to reach a negotiated solution in stronger terms. According to the recommendations of the Mexican national human rights commission, relocating the military would be a first step.

House Of Commons
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, this has been a successful year for parliament. We introduced 56 government bills into the 36th Parliament, compared with 45 in the last year of the previous parliament and we did this in a much more complex political environment in the House of Commons.

Bills passed by the House of Commons since February include the 1998 budget legislation which established the Canadian Millennium Scholarship Foundation, amendments to the Canadian Wheat Board Act and the Canada Labour Code, and legislation to create a new parks agency. These issues were complex and controversial and involved intensive work by MPs on the floor of the House and in committee.

We succeeded in moving forward on a large and difficult agenda because of the hard work of members of parliament, improved planning by the House leaders and better co-ordination between the House and the Senate.

Youth Unemployment
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gilles Bernier Tobique—Mactaquac, NB

Mr. Speaker, according to figures provided by human resources development, the minister has cut funding for summer career placements in New Brunswick by over $300,000 from last year.

On Wednesday the minister mistakenly suggested that the funds were cut because the unemployment rate for youth has dropped in New Brunswick. The minister needs to check his facts. His department's own numbers show that youth unemployment in New Brunswick is up 2% from last year to 21%.

Finding a summer job is the only way many New Brunswick students can afford to pay for the skyrocketing costs of education. Many small businesses, non-profit organizations and municipalities can only hire students with the help of government programs. Unfortunately, because of the minister's cuts to summer job programs there are students across New Brunswick who will not be able to continue their education this fall.

Last year the Liberal Party lost two-thirds of its seats in Atlantic Canada and it seems to me it has learned nothing.