House of Commons Hansard #115 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was judges.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman is comparing two different points in time, 24 years apart, and two quite different sets of rules.

Based in part upon the experience in the 1970s, Canada substantially toughened its nuclear non-proliferation requirements. Bilateral arrangements are required with any recipient countries. Signing onto the international non-proliferation rules is required. International inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency is required.

Anybody who wants to do business with Canada must adhere to those requirements.

Kosovo
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Daniel Turp Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the conflict in Kosovo is worsening daily.

After violently repressing demonstrations last March, the Serbian army is now engaged in heavy shelling, forcing tens of thousands into exile.

Since the economic sanctions and repeated warnings of the international community are not deterring Serbia, is the minister now in favour of stiffer measures, including sending combat forces to the region?

Kosovo
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, last week at the NATO council meeting a series of important initiatives were established by the foreign ministers to be looked at by the military committee and others.

Yesterday at the NATO council our ambassador asked that those examinations be accelerated so that they can be ready for examination by NATO defence ministers when they meet next week.

We are very active in making sure that the opportunity to respond to our preventive action is accelerated at the NATO council because we have to do it together.

International Trade
Oral Question Period

June 4th, 1998 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of International Trade.

There is growing public concern about decisions being made by international bodies without any accountability or transparency.

What does the minister plan to do to improve the process of transparency on trade issues at the World Trade Organization?

International Trade
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Liberal

Julian Reed Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for her very insightful question.

I would point out that at the opening plenary of the World Trade Organization two weeks ago last Monday the minister made a speech in which the keynote thrust was to let the light shine on the WTO. Two days later I had the honour of speaking at the closing plenary and the thrust of my speech was to let the light shine on the World Trade Organization.

Transitional Jobs Fund
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the human resources minister denied any scandals in the transitional jobs fund. Does he deny that 124 employees in St. John's lost their jobs? Does he deny that $1 million was wasted at BPS for politics? Does he deny that the $285,000 given to Cape Shore Seafoods has not created a single job? Does he deny that the president of Cape Shore admitted using a government guaranteed loan to pay backtaxes and liens for one of his other companies?

Will the minister—

Transitional Jobs Fund
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Minister of Human Resources Development.

Transitional Jobs Fund
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, what I think needs to be made very clear for members of the House and for the Canadian public is that the transitional jobs fund has proceeded on 700 projects and has created more than 30,000 jobs in this country. Out of 700 projects, maybe six or seven of them have not done so well.

I think that six or seven projects having difficulty out of 700 is a very good average.

Transitional Jobs Fund
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, the last minister would not substantiate that the transitional jobs fund created 80,000 jobs. At least this minister is willing to stand up. He has not denied anything. He does not have a clue. He challenged me yesterday to go outside the House and repeat the challenges. I am challenging him to go outside the House today and deny in front of the cameras that these things have happened.

Transitional Jobs Fund
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I am always amazed by the exaggerations of the member across the aisle.

The example used was BPS. The member said that 124 workers had not been paid a thing. He asked “Where has the million gone?”

I must tell the member that these workers were paid for seven months before there were difficulties. When we realized there were difficulties, we corrected the situation immediately.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, information concerning untendered contracts at defence continues on a daily basis. However, I want to focus on the Bombardier NATO, 20 year sole source contract.

Is it not true that Industry Canada is permitting Bombardier to qualify for Canadian industrial benefit credits even though it will create work or jobs at offshore locations including Northern Ireland? If that is the case, will the defence minister assure this House that these sole source contracts do not allow any industrial employment benefits which are not totally based in Canada?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would think the hon. member would be very happy that Moose Jaw is being saved by this particular project.

In fact, the Bombardier contract is part of a consortium that has delivered service to us already in Portage le Prairie, another community well served by the pilot training program. We were able to get this particular program because we were able to move fast within the NATO deadlines and we were able to provide a contract that will save the Canadian taxpayers $200 million over 20 years.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Chris Axworthy Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, it is pretty evident that this defence minister has been a disaster.

Bearing in mind that the minister has presided over the mishandling of the recommendations of the Somalia inquiry, the mishandling of sexual misconduct and black market activities in Bosnia, outrageously expensive going away parties for retiring generals, low morale and working conditions in the armed forces, untendered sweetheart deals with Bombardier and continuous numerous allegations of sexual harassment in the military which he has called poor performance, when will the Prime Minister get rid of this defence minister? How many strikes does there have to be before he is out?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I have received many requests from the premier of the province of Saskatchewan asking that we preserve the base in Moose Jaw.

There seem to be a lot of problems in that little family in the corner.

Tobacco
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, if the government was serious about reducing the number of people, particularly young people, who smoke it would not have reduced taxes on tobacco in 1994. This capitulation created the single biggest increase in the number of smokers in the history of Canada.

Attacking the smoking problem and the 40,000 deaths associated with it requires a three pronged approach: pricing, advertising and education.

When will the Minister of Health get serious about reducing the number of Canadians who smoke and reverse the regrettable decision of 1994?